2024 Tropical Weather Thread (1 Viewer)

Visiting my daughter and incredibly awesome grandson and stayed in Houston during the hurricane. We’re just outside Beltway 8 and Westheimer. Lost power Monday at 06:00. Have no idea when it will be back up.

The next door neighbor has a generator and is out of town but let them plug into an outlet for the fridge and a fan.

Driving back to Lafayette this evening. Daughter and fam may take up the offer of the neighbor and sleep their tonight.
*there
 
And continue to do so. Right in my back yard of Spring, what used to be a water way (with a retention pond) has now been tracked for 100 houses. I can’t imagine people will buy those homes (given they are being built in a water way) but people will, and flooding will be worse


id bet that 99 of those buyers have no idea that the home is built in a "watershed".

Until the first deluge of rains, then it becomes painfully obvious.
 
We are without power here in Spring, and we have been told that Centerpoint won’t have power back until later this week, so we are heading to my folks house in New Orleans for the rest of the week.

Who thought that one would need to evacuate to New Orleans to avoid a storm?
W Spring checking in.... no power, no internet, cell service is practically non-existent... fortunately, no damage...except for my fledgling okra that I had to upright.... I think they'll make it fine.

Yesterday took out to get gas for the generator, most traffic lights were out and lines at the gas stations were many dozens, if not hundreds long... Other than that, all is good.
 
W Spring checking in.... no power, no internet, cell service is practically non-existent... fortunately, no damage...except for my fledgling okra that I had to upright.... I think they'll make it fine.

Yesterday took out to get gas for the generator, most traffic lights were out and lines at the gas stations were many dozens, if not hundreds long... Other than that, all is good.
How long did you wait in line for gas?
 
How long did you wait in line for gas?
...well.... we opted for driving/scenic time instead of queue time... Started heading north on 45 and it was the same story over and over, long lines in Spring, Woodlands, Conroe, Willis, all the way up to, and including Huntsville... took a left and went to College Station... filled up truck and 7 gas cans, exchanged a propane bottle, had a good fajita lunch and came home via 249 (nice!!).

This morning, took 99 to Katy... approaching I-10, could have pulled up to pumps at a handful of stations... no waiting... this was ~7:30am or so.
 
id bet that 99 of those buyers have no idea that the home is built in a "watershed".

Until the first deluge of rains, then it becomes painfully obvious.
We have neighborhoods near us that have been around for 20+ years, and they never flooded. During Harvey, a literal wall of water came from an area that was once a watershed, but was developed into Bridgeland, and the water ran down to the older neighborhood, flooding it badly. Looking at the way the fences were flattened, it sure seemed to be from the pressure of water flowing into the area, not from any wind or accumulating rainfall. And all the while Bridgeland developers bragged how their area largely didn't flood.

We have never flooded in the 20 years we've lived here; the water never got to the top of the curb during Harvey. But they've built behind us and the lots are higher, so water flows down through our yard now. Telge Rd near us used to be just a few older homes and farmland. Now they have built neighborhoods on one side of Telge, and they are literally several feet higher than the main road. Those poor people who have been there with no flooding are very likely at risk now. They way the new development is being built in a way that hurts the established neighborhoods is frustrating.

And we're now into day three of no power. The cul-de-sac street across from our house has power on one side as of last night; the other side who shares a grid with us is still without as well. I'm alternating between hopeful that we're next, or worried that there's a deeper problem that will take days. We did have a couple of blinks on Monday night, which made me hopeful, but nothing since then. I hope that means we don't have catastrophic damage to our part of the grid. Because it's HOT.
 

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I disagree with the Houston is prone to flooding narratives to an extent.

Houston to Lafayette is located along a part of the gulf coast where rainfall rates tend to maximize as well as training thunderstorms. That area tends to sit right where the better instability from the plains due to cold air aloft begins to end and it tends to sit in an area that is just out of the main upper level flow. It's why so many cyclones stall in that area. Houston doesn't flood from typical thunderstorm like most think. They just get 10+ inches of rain in a few hours more than any other city in the USA by a pretty huge margin. You dump 10" in any US city in 3 hours and it turns into a giant sheet show. Like any city, Houston has it's problem spots but when Galveston Bay surges while that rain falls and the bayous can't drain then it becomes a big problem. Charleston is another city that has this issue.

I can show video from major cities from LA, Dallas, Houston, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Charleston, Miami, New York City, etc, etc, etc. 10" of rain in a short period and it's bad.
 
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I disagree with the Houston is prone to flooding narratives to an extent.

Houston to Lafayette is located along a part of the gulf coast where rainfall rates tend to maximize as well as training thunderstorms. That area tends to sit right where the better instability from the plains due to cold air aloft begins to end and it tends to sit in an area that is just out of the main upper level flow. It's why so many cyclones stall in that area. Houston doesn't flood from typical thunderstorm like most think. They just get 10+ inches of rain in a few hours more than any other city in the USA by a pretty huge margin. You dump 10" in any US city in 3 hours and it turns into a giant sheet show. Like any city, Houston has it's problem spots but when Galveston Bay surges while that rain falls and the bayous can't drain then it becomes a big problem. Charleston is another city that has this issue.

I can show video from major cities from LA, Dallas, Houston, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Charleston, Miami, New York City, etc, etc, etc. 10" of rain in a short period and it's bad.

Charleston sees about 75 flood events a year - and they happen from any sort of excessive rainfall (even just big thunderstorms) and from heavy tides, even without rain. The 20-year average (flood events per year) in Charleston has increased six-fold since 1985.
 
We have neighborhoods near us that have been around for 20+ years, and they never flooded. During Harvey, a literal wall of water came from an area that was once a watershed, but was developed into Bridgeland, and the water ran down to the older neighborhood, flooding it badly. Looking at the way the fences were flattened, it sure seemed to be from the pressure of water flowing into the area, not from any wind or accumulating rainfall. And all the while Bridgeland developers bragged how their area largely didn't flood.

We have never flooded in the 20 years we've lived here; the water never got to the top of the curb during Harvey. But they've built behind us and the lots are higher, so water flows down through our yard now. Telge Rd near us used to be just a few older homes and farmland. Now they have built neighborhoods on one side of Telge, and they are literally several feet higher than the main road. Those poor people who have been there with no flooding are very likely at risk now. They way the new development is being built in a way that hurts the established neighborhoods is frustrating.

And we're now into day three of no power. The cul-de-sac street across from our house has power on one side as of last night; the other side who shares a grid with us is still without as well. I'm alternating between hopeful that we're next, or worried that there's a deeper problem that will take days. We did have a couple of blinks on Monday night, which made me hopeful, but nothing since then. I hope that means we don't have catastrophic damage to our part of the grid. Because it's HOT.

Not to derail this thread, but understand completely.

I live in Covington, on a creek, and with all the development West/North of us, that creek is now a main tributary to the Tchefuncte river, whereas before it was simply a small "branch" style creek. Heavy rains now fill that creek to top within hours and it doesnt subside since its still getting water from all the areas W/NW/N of us for miles. And development has exacerbated the issue in that the water fills up quicker since runoff is quicker ( vs over soil/forested lands )

Developers arent worried about where the water goes, so long as it doesnt affect their development and hinder their ability to sell parcels.
 
, Houston has it's problem spots but when Galveston Bay surges while that rain falls and the bayous can't drain then it becomes a big problem. Charleston is another city that has this issue.

I can show video from major cities from LA, Dallas, Houston, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Charleston, Miami, New York City, etc, etc, etc. 10" of rain in a short period and it's bad.

living on a branch creek of the Tchefuncte, i know this story all too well. Shoot, dont even have to be storm surge. If its a stiff south wind over Lake Ponchartrain with training thunderstorms, you can see the rate of flow in the creek go from very fast to very slow ( and 2 instances ( 2016 and 2020 ) where the west to east flow was literally a crawl speed which led to massive flooding ) because winds push the water back up the Tchefuncte, acting like a back flow and hindering every single feeder stream, creek or bayou.
 
Power!

Finally got the power back on about 10:20. So glad! It was miserable last night trying to sleep.

The A/C unit said 85 when the power came back on. We've set it to 77 so as not to overtax it (hopefully). After close to an hour now, we're down to 82. Getting there, but still running fans on all of us.
 
I just received this link from my daughter. It the map shows the phases of the power outages, etc.

 

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