A measles outbreak is occurring in the Northwest in localities with lower-than-average vaccination rates (1 Viewer)

superchuck500

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Go figure. Washington state governor has declared a state of emergency over an outbreak that is centered in Clark County - where almost 25% of children are unvaccinated. According to health officials, most of the 55 cases are among unvaccinated children.

Amber Gorrow is afraid to leave her house with her infant son because she lives at the epicenter of Washington state’s worst measles outbreak in more than two decades. Born eight weeks ago, Leon is too young to get his first measles shot, putting him at risk for the highly contagious respiratory virus, which can be fatal in small children.

Gorrow also lives in a community where she said being anti-vaccine is as acceptable as being vegan or going gluten free. Almost a quarter of kids in Clark County, Wash., a suburb of Portland, Ore., go to school without measles, mumps and rubella immunizations, and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) recently declared a state of emergency amid concern that things could rapidly spin out of control.

Measles outbreaks have sprung up in nine other states this winter, but officials are particularly alarmed about the one in Clark County because of its potential to go very big, very quickly.

The Pacific Northwest is home to some of the nation’s most vocal andorganized anti-vaccination activists. That movement has helped drive down child immunizations in Washington, as well as in neighboring Oregon and Idaho, to some of the lowest rates in the country, with as many as 10.5 percent of kindergartners statewide in Idaho unvaccinated for measles. That is almost double the median rate nationally.

Libertarian-leaning lawmakers, meanwhile, have bowed to public pressure to relax state laws to exempt virtually any child from state vaccination requirements whose parents object. Three states allow only medical exemptions; most others also permit religious exemptions. And 17,including Washington, Oregon and Idaho, allow what they call “philosophical” exemptions, meaning virtually anyone can opt out of the requirements.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/it-will-take-off-like-a-wildfire-the-unique-dangers-of-the-washington-state-measles-outbreak/2019/02/06/cfd5088a-28fa-11e9-b011-d8500644dc98_story.html?utm_term=.61ca4eb8327e
 

Saint_Ward

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I greened-thumb your original post because I thought it was valuable for the discussion (and I was happy to see you over here). I think that ultimately the question is one of policy and not of science . . . there's enough science on both sides to prompt a serious policy debate. I think it might be a bit unfair to accuse the 'pro-vaccine' crowd as dogmatic about science that might not actually exist while not also recognizing that a substantial percentage of the 'anti-vaccine' crowd is operating off of an emotional response to suspect research about correlations that probably don't exist.

But what does exist is that vaccines, like almost every medication, have an incidence (albeit low but over broad populations, still very meaningful) of adverse response, some very serious. And that can cause real fear - and when you're talking about a mandate across the population to do something that comes with risk, something that will likely harm a very, very small number it is going to be controversial.

I just think this is one of things where the utility of the measure is obvious, but there will be casualties and who's going to risk their child to 'take one for the team'? Most of us do. I read quite a bit about vaccines when I had my kids (now age 5 and 4) and I was concerned about it. But don't we roll the dice every time we get in the car? Every time we take any kind of medication? Swim in the ocean?

We do these things because we decide they're worth the risk.
And don't even get going about the food supply...
 

Saint_Ward

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Yep. I have a lower risk tolerance. When you've experienced the 1 in a million event even that seems very real.

I've seen a lot of this over the years and I find it interesting about how polarizing and invective inducing it is. It's not just blanket anti-vax. It's also deviation from orthodoxy that seems to raise ire. My ex whose daughter had the seizures stopped vaccinating as a result and still gets the stink eye from quite a few in the school.
Well, you really did hit the nail on the head there. Every single subject in America. What's the "norm" supposed to be. If you're against that, even with a thoughtful reason, people get mad.

Not to rehash it here, but it's pretty much how the flag debate went with the few NFL players kneeling, how any discussion on Israel goes, Insurance, Taxes, etc.

Heck, I get irate when people can't handle a freaking 4 way stop correctly.
 

onthurdays

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I have a friend who’s baby died the night they got multiple vaccines. Bleeding out of every oriface. Fa realz. It happens.
 

mt15

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I’m very sorry your friend lost her baby. That sort of symptom (widespread hemorrhage, especially on the same day as vaccination) doesn’t sound like the known complications I have heard about. Can you provide more information?
 

Goatman Saint

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Now mumps breaking out in Montana. All we need is some good ol fashioned polio to make wheelchairs and leg braces the new fashionable things again.
 

Taurus

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Good.

While the Internet is great at providing an echo chamber for parents to pretend that a vaccination is more dangerous than polio itself, kids tend to surf more broadly and the rest of the Internet is great at A: mocking those parents for being idiots and B: providing information on how vaccines actually work and where to get them.
 

Goatman Saint

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Since I never sleep from 130-330 anymore (wonders of being older) I read an investigative report by the national institute of health. Scintillating reading. If you want to put yourself to sleep I highly recommend it. Anyway it was a study from 1974-2014 about the effects of death only and immunization. They looked at anaphylactic shock as a cause of death (suggestive). However, when they compared the rate of natural SIDS and times with immunizations and went through each one, there was absolutely no difference. Many times reports of child death due to vaccination upon autopsy were confirmed as some other issue unknown to anyone, it just happened to coincide with the vaccine. The National institute of health could find no additional risk of death as opposed to background rates of death. Now, not to say that some things cause serious issues, as my own cousin nearly died of GB after his MMR, to the point the priest had baptized him and was ready for last rites it was that close.
 

egautr1

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And then there is this gem......

https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/anti-vaxxers-fund-study-finds-zero-link-between-vaccinations-and-autism/

Anti-Vaxxers Fund Study That Finds Zero Link Between Vaccinations And Autism

But for one group at least, this method of funding scientific studies to prove their point seems to have backfired. A six-year study looking into the effect that vaccinations have on the neurological development and social behavior of rhesus macaque infants, funded in part by the anti-vaccination and autism advocacy group SafeMinds, concluded that there was no evidence at all for such a link.
Oh lordy lord! Some people just don't want to ever acknowledge that they are wrong. Just can't accept reality. Too bad their stupidity is putting lots of other people at risk.
 

Zztop

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I'm pretty annoyed with anti-vaxxers.
It is harmful and dangerous not to get your children vaccinated.
Then you have people like...this questionably sane person:

Wife of White House communications chief goes on anti-vaccine tirade
Faced with criticism over her comments, Shine accused “the Left” of attempting to smear her. She also suggested, without evidence, that measles can cure cancer, pointing to a 2014 case that was far more complex and did not draw any kind of definitive conclusions.

This is not the first time Darla’s Shine’s public statements have sparked controversy. She once declared that sunscreen was “a hoax” and on numerous occasions pushed debunked theories about the danger of vaccines.
 

mt15

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Pushing crazy conspiracy type theories about vaccines isn’t a joke, it harms and could possibly be responsible for the death of children from diseases that are preventable.

It’s one thing to push conspiracy theories about contrails and who really killed JFK. But pushing conspiracy theories that discourage parents from protecting their children through vaccination is despicable.
 

Goatman Saint

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I'm pretty annoyed with anti-vaxxers.
It is harmful and dangerous not to get your children vaccinated.
Then you have people like...this questionably sane person:

Wife of White House communications chief goes on anti-vaccine tirade
Faced with criticism over her comments, Shine accused “the Left” of attempting to smear her. She also suggested, without evidence, that measles can cure cancer, pointing to a 2014 case that was far more complex and did not draw any kind of definitive conclusions.

This is not the first time Darla’s Shine’s public statements have sparked controversy. She once declared that sunscreen was “a hoax” and on numerous occasions pushed debunked theories about the danger of vaccines.
Sad thing is she read just enough of something to be dangerous. Yes, there were some successful trials where they took the virus that causes measles, changed it to attack cancer cells as a viral targeted treatment. Yes it worked in that trial. But to say measles cures cancer, just no.
 

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