Another bad school assignment (2 Viewers)

Madmarsha

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A mother has blasted a Washington middle school after her 14-year-old twin daughters, who are black, were made to clean freshly picked cotton during a history lesson.

Emzayia and Zyeshauwne Feazell, 14, said that they were the only black students who had to participate in a cotton picking lesson plan at Sacajawea Middle School in Spokane.

The girls told ABC News that on May 3 their social studies teacher pulled out a box of raw cotton and told the class they were going to do a 'fun' activity.

The teacher then instructed students to clean freshly picked cotton as part of a classroom assignment to see who could do so the fastest.

The sisters, who were the only black students in the class, said the lesson made them feel uncomfortable.............

Wow.
 

DaveXA

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A mother has blasted a Washington middle school after her 14-year-old twin daughters, who are black, were made to clean freshly picked cotton during a history lesson.

Emzayia and Zyeshauwne Feazell, 14, said that they were the only black students who had to participate in a cotton picking lesson plan at Sacajawea Middle School in Spokane.

The girls told ABC News that on May 3 their social studies teacher pulled out a box of raw cotton and told the class they were going to do a 'fun' activity.

The teacher then instructed students to clean freshly picked cotton as part of a classroom assignment to see who could do so the fastest.

The sisters, who were the only black students in the class, said the lesson made them feel uncomfortable.............

I get why they'd feel uncomfortable. Not sure why the teacher didn't think to ask them about it before doing the exercise. I mean, this is a history class, so, teacher should be aware of how this might look to those who would be impacted by it.
 

Saint_Ward

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A mother has blasted a Washington middle school after her 14-year-old twin daughters, who are black, were made to clean freshly picked cotton during a history lesson.

Emzayia and Zyeshauwne Feazell, 14, said that they were the only black students who had to participate in a cotton picking lesson plan at Sacajawea Middle School in Spokane.

The girls told ABC News that on May 3 their social studies teacher pulled out a box of raw cotton and told the class they were going to do a 'fun' activity.

The teacher then instructed students to clean freshly picked cotton as part of a classroom assignment to see who could do so the fastest.

The sisters, who were the only black students in the class, said the lesson made them feel uncomfortable.............

At the same time, isn't it a bit of an over reaction? Hear me out, just talking out loud.

I mean, no one is freaking out about wearing cotton clothes. It's not like cotton is inherently bad.

It seems like the point of the lesson was to show how much of a pain it was to clean cotton, and why the cotton gin was a very important invention to speed that up. Where it gets complicated is that speed lead to more demand for cotton, which lead to a growth in slavery.

The article tries to make it sound like they were singled out and forced to do this. The whole class was given some and asked who could do it the fastest. Seems like anyone may have had an opportunity to not do it. They can't say they were the only black girls forced to do this, when there were no other black kids in the class.

I do wonder how much the kids were offended at first, vs how much the mom was later. I dunno.
 

CoolBrees

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No Ward, I don’t think it is an overreaction. There is no educational benefit to seeding cotton.

And btw, the cotton gin picked and seeded cotton, it wasn’t a textile machine.

Eli Whitney’s invention helped bring the end to slavery, not perpetuate it.
 

Sun Wukong

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Eli Whitney’s invention helped bring the end to slavery, not perpetuate it.

The exact opposite, actually. It dramatically increased demand for slaves. Cotton was seen as too much of a pain in the arse for lots of farmers prior to the cotton gin making it easily processable, at which point everyone jumped into the cotton game. But while the processing was mechanized, the planting, tending, harvesting, etc. were not, and it led to an explosion in demand for slavery.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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I'm certainly not, but I am interested in hearing from someone who is.
what popped out for me from the article was the students having no idea (going in) what the point of the exercise was
-- now full caveat, i have certainly been in situations many times where i have explained and reexplained and reexplained an assignment only to be met with shock and bewilderment when the assignment is given
but i know even more that predominantly white schools like to take a 'one culture fits all' approach to history/literature that almost encourages the sort of tone deaf/tone blind lessons that OP has brought to this thread
 

Grandadmiral

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At the same time, isn't it a bit of an over reaction? Hear me out, just talking out loud.

I mean, no one is freaking out about wearing cotton clothes. It's not like cotton is inherently bad.

It seems like the point of the lesson was to show how much of a pain it was to clean cotton, and why the cotton gin was a very important invention to speed that up. Where it gets complicated is that speed lead to more demand for cotton, which lead to a growth in slavery.

The article tries to make it sound like they were singled out and forced to do this. The whole class was given some and asked who could do it the fastest. Seems like anyone may have had an opportunity to not do it. They can't say they were the only black girls forced to do this, when there were no other black kids in the class.

I do wonder how much the kids were offended at first, vs how much the mom was later. I dunno.
Yeah, dude. Gonna have to disagree with this 100%. I was very interactive the few years I taught high school American history. I would never do this even with an all-white class.
 

Grandadmiral

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Eli Whitney’s invention helped bring the end to slavery, not perpetuate it.
As Sun already posted, this is 100% incorrect. The invention of the cotton gin caused planters to want to grow and harvest more cotton. They needed more slaves to make that happen. If anything, it led to the expansion of the black market after 1808. South Carolina had temporarily stopped the transatlantic trade only to reinstitute it before the federal ban.
 

DaveXA

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As Sun already posted, this is 100% incorrect. The invention of the cotton gin caused planters to want to grow and harvest more cotton. They needed more slaves to make that happen. If anything, it led to the expansion of the black market after 1808. South Carolina had temporarily stopped the transatlantic trade only to reinstitute it before the federal ban.
I'm curious, were there other factors aside from the Civil War and the Underground Railroad that contributed to the end of slavery? I'm wondering if economics played a role? I would think so, but I don't really know. Is there a good book that I can read that covers the topic?
 

guidomerkinsrules

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I'm curious, were there other factors aside from the Civil War and the Underground Railroad that contributed to the end of slavery? I'm wondering if economics played a role? I would think so, but I don't really know. Is there a good book that I can read that covers the topic?
GA probably has some better nuts and bolts arguments, but the Abolitionist movement had been going on for about a century before Emancipation - the moral argument for slavery was the africans, et al were lesser humans than whites so slavery was akin to keeping horses and cattle
but the more people heard black abolitionists speak, the harder it became to justify slavery on moral grounds
Slave revolts in the South and carribbean didn't help much (even though they were also used to buttress the 2nd amendment with race clauses)
 

Saint_Ward

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No Ward, I don’t think it is an overreaction. There is no educational benefit to seeding cotton.

And btw, the cotton gin picked and seeded cotton, it wasn’t a textile machine.

Eli Whitney’s invention helped bring the end to slavery, not perpetuate it.
1. To understand how much of a time suck it used to be.

2. I know what it does.

3. Nope, look it up. It fueled a demand for more cotton, because it was now a much more viable material for textiles. More needed to be planted and harvested. Honestly, I was under the same impression you were until I looked it up before I posted.
 

Saint_Ward

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Yeah, dude. Gonna have to disagree with this 100%. I was very interactive the few years I taught high school American history. I would never do this even with an all-white class.
That's fair. I'd like to hear why.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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That's fair. I'd like to hear why.
Class, as we talked about last week that the Jewish people had to build parts of their concentration camps.
you see the bundles of barbed wire over there, here are the nails. Mordecai, Rebekah will you hand out the hammers, please
 

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