Are you willing to get the Covid vaccine when offered? (3 Viewers)

Will you get the covid vaccine when offered?

  • Yes

    Votes: 221 82.8%
  • No

    Votes: 50 18.7%

  • Total voters
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Immunity after getting COVID looks much more robust than initial fears. There is still a risk of reinvention...but the same goes for receiving the vaccine. If we are moving down this path of “proving immunity”, and we are also interested in science leading our decisions and not politics...titers or a documented diagnosis of COVID should suffice. With this study, there is not fantastic evidence that you are more immune or less capable of spreading the illness with the vaccine versus innate immunity. I still recommend that people should get vaccinated...but I also think that proving immunity is silly and if it’s going to be done, it should be based upon science.
 

faceman

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Immunity after getting COVID looks much more robust than initial fears. There is still a risk of reinvention...but the same goes for receiving the vaccine. If we are moving down this path of “proving immunity”, and we are also interested in science leading our decisions and not politics...titers or a documented diagnosis of COVID should suffice. With this study, there is not fantastic evidence that you are more immune or less capable of spreading the illness with the vaccine versus innate immunity. I still recommend that people should get vaccinated...but I also think that proving immunity is silly and if it’s going to be done, it should be based upon science.
Haven't we been moving down the same path years ago? I'm 59 and my parents had to prove immunization of some diseases before I was allowed to attend 1st grade in a public school system.

My wife and I had to do the same when our daughter started school. She'll have to do the same when my granddaughter starts.

A quick search says a child in Ms. needs these vaccines before he or she is allowed to attend public school. Should Covid be required? right mow, that's the million dollar ?

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Hepatitis B.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
 

superchuck500

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Immunity after getting COVID looks much more robust than initial fears. There is still a risk of reinvention...but the same goes for receiving the vaccine. If we are moving down this path of “proving immunity”, and we are also interested in science leading our decisions and not politics...titers or a documented diagnosis of COVID should suffice. With this study, there is not fantastic evidence that you are more immune or less capable of spreading the illness with the vaccine versus innate immunity. I still recommend that people should get vaccinated...but I also think that proving immunity is silly and if it’s going to be done, it should be based upon science.

This is the big question here on post-infection antibodies:

"However, the observation ended before SARS-CoV-2 variants began to spread, and it is unknown how well natural immunity to the wild-type virus will protect against variants."


I have seen contrasting speculation from the infectious disease community. Would like to see some real analysis.
 

bclemms

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Immunity after getting COVID looks much more robust than initial fears. There is still a risk of reinvention...but the same goes for receiving the vaccine. If we are moving down this path of “proving immunity”, and we are also interested in science leading our decisions and not politics...titers or a documented diagnosis of COVID should suffice. With this study, there is not fantastic evidence that you are more immune or less capable of spreading the illness with the vaccine versus innate immunity. I still recommend that people should get vaccinated...but I also think that proving immunity is silly and if it’s going to be done, it should be based upon science.
I have no problems with that and I would suspect most do not. I also have no problem with adjusting those requirements as more information becomes available.

I do have a problem with letting the idiots among us jeopardize society as a whole. If you have had a PCR test confirming covid infection and immunity then fine. However, that PCR test will eliminate about 20 Million people in the US that will swear they were patient 0 in fall of 2019. lol
 

faceman

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This is the big question here on post-infection antibodies:

"However, the observation ended before SARS-CoV-2 variants began to spread, and it is unknown how well natural immunity to the wild-type virus will protect against variants."


I have seen contrasting speculation from the infectious disease community. Would like to see some real analysis.
I was curious of this as well. A definitive answer won't be know for awhile unfortunately.


Although reports of reinfection from the novel coronavirus have been rare so far, public health experts worry that new variants of the virus may be less susceptible to natural immunity—meaning people who've recovered from a previous coronavirus infection may be at risk of reinfection by a new variant.

Once again, the best advice is still to get vaccinated.
 

where yat brah

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A quick search says a child in Ms. needs these vaccines before he or she is allowed to attend public school. Should Covid be required? right mow, that's the million dollar ?

  • Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Hepatitis B.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
FL requirements for public schools include:

  • Four or five doses of DTaP
  • Four or five doses of IPV
  • Two doses of MMR
  • Three doses of Hep B
  • One Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap)
  • Two doses of Varicella (kindergarten effective with 2008–2009 school year, then an additional grade is added each year thereafter).
 

Eeyore

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Things are about to become interesting.
If the vaccines had been given full FDA approval I'd say that the employees didn't have a leg to stand on but, to my knowledge, they have not.

I know of several companys that claim that they may require vaccination after full FDA approval but they don't think that they can until then.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

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If the vaccines had been given full FDA approval I'd say that the employees didn't have a leg to stand on but, to my knowledge, they have not.

I know of several companys that claim that they may require vaccination after full FDA approval but they don't think that they can until then.



I’m no labor attorney, but ive always thought that private companies have the right to terminate employees for any reason they desire, as long as it doesnt fall into a handful of categories like gender, race, sexual orientation and a couple of others.. So, theoretically, if Methodist hospital decided they wanted every employee to dye their hair purple, they could fire anyone who didnt want to go along with it, and be within their rights.. Again, purely theoretically speaking.
 

buzd

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I’m no labor attorney, but ive always thought that private companies have the right to terminate employees for any reason they desire, as long as it doesnt fall into a handful of categories like gender, race, sexual orientation and a couple of others.. So, theoretically, if Methodist hospital decided they wanted every employee to dye their hair purple, they could fire anyone who didnt want to go along with it, and be within their rights.. Again, purely theoretically speaking.
Depends on the state.
 

faceman

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I’m no labor attorney, but ive always thought that private companies have the right to terminate employees for any reason they desire, as long as it doesnt fall into a handful of categories like gender, race, sexual orientation and a couple of others.. So, theoretically, if Methodist hospital decided they wanted every employee to dye their hair purple, they could fire anyone who didnt want to go along with it, and be within their rights.. Again, purely theoretically speaking.
Buz is correct. It depends on the state. If it's a right to work state, the employer has all the advantages. My father was unjustifialbly fired from a job he held for 25 years. He graduated HS with one of the best criminal defense lawyers in the nation. My dad sought his advice. His friend said there is nothing I can do. This is a right to work state and they can tell what side of your hair you have to part. It's not fair, but it's legal
 

UncleTrvlingJim

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Texas is a right to work state, so they can fire employees for any reason except for a federally protected class.
 

buzd

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Buz is correct. It depends on the state. If it's a right to work state, the employer has all the advantages. My father was unjustifialbly fired from a job he held for 25 years. He graduated HS with one of the best criminal defense lawyers in the nation. My dad sought his advice. His friend said there is nothing I can do. This is a right to work state and they can tell what side of your hair you have to part. It's not fair, but it's legal

Yep.

And not a lawyer, but I think Eeyore's point is valid. The fact that it's emergency use and not fully approved may change the dynamics, legally. I really don't know.
 

Doug B

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And not a lawyer, but I think Eeyore's point is valid. The fact that it's emergency use and not fully approved may change the dynamics, legally.
I agree with Eeyore as well. Having said that, those employees are only buying themselves a few months. The Pfizer and Moderna full approvals are a faits accomplis.
 

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