COVID-19 Outbreak Information Updates (Reboot) [13,137,962 US cases, 268,219 US deaths.] (25 Viewers)

Dan in Lafayette

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The original COVID-19 Outbreak thread has been closed but is still available as a read-only thread (sticky above). The original thread had become less and less about new information and more about petty bickering. The purpose of this new thread is to link or report new information as it comes out. Try not to go off course from the topic. Those of you who had been banned from the original thread feel free to participate in this new thread. Just stay on topic. Thank you.
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Edit - Andrus:
Bottom line is that moving forward we simply don't want any political bickering going on within this thread, and want to try to limit this thread to being as much about sharing Covid-19 information as possible.

If you want to discuss the political aspects of Covid-19 with other SR members, you can do so here (If you are not already registered there, you will be required to do so)...
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UPDATED TRACKER LINKS:

 

NewOrleansFan

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Just found out my son’s school in St Tammany will close 14 days until December because of COVID outbreak. St. Tammany cases and positive numbers have increased the past week.
 

bonnjer

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Let's talk vaccines:

1. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are based on mRNA tech, right? I know there are some basic (but significant for a few) side effects similar to flu vaccinations, but what possible long-term issues may be present with this? Is it a case of "we don't know what we don't know" at this point? I know the issues with the first polio vaccine back in the day came about pretty quickly and vaccine tech was new at that time, so are we really worried about safety of the vaccine in this day and age?

2. I keep seeing all of these companies have been producing vaccine ahead of time in the hopes they work. Great. I also see that the vaccines have to be stored properly. That would lead me to believe they have an "expiration date" of sorts. How can they produce large quantities that far ahead of time and keep them stable? Very cold storage, I guess?

3. I asked this several pages ago, but it got no reply, so tossing it in again here. Once we get the vaccine and get the second shot and build immunity, the vaccinated individual is protected. At that point, can the person still be a carrier who could spread it to those who are not vaccinated? (I know people will say, "Then they should get the vaccine." Let's ignore that a moment.)
 

gboudx

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3. I asked this several pages ago, but it got no reply, so tossing it in again here. Once we get the vaccine and get the second shot and build immunity, the vaccinated individual is protected. At that point, can the person still be a carrier who could spread it to those who are not vaccinated? (I know people will say, "Then they should get the vaccine." Let's ignore that a moment.)
From what I understand of how vaccines work, you either have the virus, or you don't. I don't think it could be lurking in your respiratory system in a non-virulent way. Based on immunity from the vaccine, if the body detects the virus, it attacks and kills it. I could be wrong, and maybe it lies in a dormant state. But god I hope not.
 

faceman

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From what I understand of how vaccines work, you either have the virus, or you don't. I don't think it could be lurking in your respiratory system in a non-virulent way. Based on immunity from the vaccine, if the body detects the virus, it attacks and kills it. I could be wrong, and maybe it lies in a dormant state. But god I hope not.
Based on history of vaccines, my answer would be no. Getting vaccinated against the flu doesn't make you a carrier.
 

buzd

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From what I understand of how vaccines work, you either have the virus, or you don't. I don't think it could be lurking in your respiratory system in a non-virulent way. Based on immunity from the vaccine, if the body detects the virus, it attacks and kills it. I could be wrong, and maybe it lies in a dormant state. But god I hope not.
I have heard otherwise, but I don't remember where from or whether it was credible. I think it was an in-person conversation from someone that should know, but I also wasn't paying that much attention.
 

buzd

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1. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are based on mRNA tech, right? I know there are some basic (but significant for a few) side effects similar to flu vaccinations, but what possible long-term issues may be present with this? Is it a case of "we don't know what we don't know" at this point? I know the issues with the first polio vaccine back in the day came about pretty quickly and vaccine tech was new at that time, so are we really worried about safety of the vaccine in this day and age?
I have concerns because the mRNA is new technology. The concern I have seen longterm is that it could change your immune system in a way that it could malfunction somehow significantly down the road (antibodies attacking healthy cells and such). I haven't seen that it will happen, just speculation that if something were to go wrong, that could be the thing.

It's probably not going to keep me from getting the vaccine (and I only say probably because if there is a different type of vaccine available, I might opt for that), but that's the concern I've read about.
 

J.T.

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Let's talk vaccines:

1. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are based on mRNA tech, right? I know there are some basic (but significant for a few) side effects similar to flu vaccinations, but what possible long-term issues may be present with this? Is it a case of "we don't know what we don't know" at this point? I know the issues with the first polio vaccine back in the day came about pretty quickly and vaccine tech was new at that time, so are we really worried about safety of the vaccine in this day and age?

2. I keep seeing all of these companies have been producing vaccine ahead of time in the hopes they work. Great. I also see that the vaccines have to be stored properly. That would lead me to believe they have an "expiration date" of sorts. How can they produce large quantities that far ahead of time and keep them stable? Very cold storage, I guess?

3. I asked this several pages ago, but it got no reply, so tossing it in again here. Once we get the vaccine and get the second shot and build immunity, the vaccinated individual is protected. At that point, can the person still be a carrier who could spread it to those who are not vaccinated? (I know people will say, "Then they should get the vaccine." Let's ignore that a moment.)
1. Long term, we don't know for sure. From what I know and people I have spoken with who have a pretty good understanding of this, the mRNA vaccines should have no long term negative side effects. (They may even help against the cold?) Technology is WAY more advanced than it was even just five years ago. The last 20 years has seen advances in Science on a par with cell phones. It is crazy how much they know now.

2. They can be kept in very cold storage (mRNA vaccines) or they only require refrigeration to be kept stable for months. The major ramp up in production started in the last 2-3 months and these pretty much will all have a shelf (cold) life of several months. Some of the next ones should be even more stable for longer periods. Astra, JNJ Sanofi, etc, all look to have longer shelf lives or less storage/cooling requirements.

3. Vaccine should make you good to go, but still with understanding that the first two look to be 95% effective. Need MANY people to get the shots to really tamp this thing down for good. (Might not ever go "away" but could be decreased significantly so that it is less of a worry than the seasonal flu.) Effective vaccine should mean that a person cannot spread disease.

Given all of that, I would be willing to get shot up in both arms with the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines today. Assuming, Astra comes back good, they can have a leg. (You will only get one vaccine, this is a joke.)
 

faceman

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1. Long term, we don't know for sure. From what I know and people I have spoken with who have a pretty good understanding of this, the mRNA vaccines should have no long term negative side effects. (They may even help against the cold?) Technology is WAY more advanced than it was even just five years ago. The last 20 years has seen advances in Science on a par with cell phones. It is crazy how much they know now.

2. They can be kept in very cold storage (mRNA vaccines) or they only require refrigeration to be kept stable for months. The major ramp up in production started in the last 2-3 months and these pretty much will all have a shelf (cold) life of several months. Some of the next ones should be even more stable for longer periods. Astra, JNJ Sanofi, etc, all look to have longer shelf lives or less storage/cooling requirements.

3. Vaccine should make you good to go, but still with understanding that the first two look to be 95% effective. Need MANY people to get the shots to really tamp this thing down for good. (Might not ever go "away" but could be decreased significantly so that it is less of a worry than the seasonal flu.) Effective vaccine should mean that a person cannot spread disease.

Given all of that, I would be willing to get shot up in both arms with the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines today. Assuming, Astra comes back good, they can have a leg. (You will only get one vaccine, this is a joke.)
My question is will it be a one time shot,or require yearly vaccinations like the flu.
 

Goatman Saint

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I was watching a thing about vaccine development which I thought was interesting. The researcher was discussing the time line. He was basically saying that the actual testing timeframe is very similar and that the testing isn’t being rushed. What’s changed is the buttload of cash to keep trials moving as fast as possible, and the review which may sit on a variety of people’s desks for weeks is now being immediately reviewed by everyone as fast as possible. He was saying this was the only real difference in the timeframe.
1. Now about the safety of mRNA. Supposedly, this should be safer than a regular vaccine if the dacuments I’ve read are to be believed. It does it’s signaling to the body and it’s gone. In theory should be very safe with less potential issues. With keeping up as best I can, I’ll happily take it.
As far as things developing, it’s possible, but our knowledge as a scientific community about the body is way ahead of the 1940s and 1950s.
2. Expiration dates only really are an issue in the holding temperature where the levels will decline. With the ultra cold temps it’s being long term stored at there should be no degradation as nothing really happens at those temperatures. I’m pretty sure it’s similar technology to storing eggs and sperm which have a near indefinite shelf life.
3. The person shouldn’t be a carrier as they have immunity. They may have a small amount but it should be pounced on easily by the body. Covid needs a decent dose to cause an infection, and that simply wouldn’t be enough of a viral load.
4. The other part about this is the post where Covid was mutating so badly in a patient that they died because it stays ahead of the immune response. This is simply crap. The HIV virus, which is the most unstable of the bunch doesn’t even do this. Also, the guy insinuating that this virus is similar to common cold virus which are always mutating. First there are over 225 different common cold viruses. While yes, they can mutate, the unique thing about Covid, , and SARS and MERS, is the fact they are not similar to anything else. Once this makes the rounds through having it or getting vaccinated, this family line of coronavirus will be effectively blunted. Yes, people could still get a version, but the body would still recognize that spike which is being used. Hence, you wouldn’t get nearly as sick as the body would pounce on it that much quicker.
Besides, who is running gene sequencing on a single patient to follow the mutations in real life like that? I mean come on people
 

Goatman Saint

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My question is will it be a one time shot,or require yearly vaccinations like the flu.
Nope one time shot. Coronavirus is stable enough and these are showing a strong immune response. Ignore the whole immunity fading after 4 months thing. That’s active immunity. T and B cell immunity from SARS is still. There after 15 years, and early (8month) data shows this is behaving in the same manner.
 

nolaswede

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This will end up being the biggest super spreader event of the entire pandemic. People protesting voter fraud that didn't happen who don't believe in a virus that is happening. This is sturgis on steroids at a time where daily cases are about 400% higher than when Sturgis took place except instead of the population density of Sturgis, this is taking place in the population dense DC area.

I was in DC last weekend and was so impressed that 95% of people wore masks. And DC has done pretty well overall with the # of cases. Now, that’s about to change 😕
 

superchuck500

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My question is will it be a one time shot,or require yearly vaccinations like the flu.
I think that depends on how the virus continues to circulate and how long the vaccine provides meaningful immunity. The virus itself is quite narrow in its genome - at least compared to other viruses that cause humans to get sick. If effective vaccines are deployed worldwide, it's possible that viral circulation will be so substantially degraded that it is effectively 'gone' in many places. It isn't like the flu (at least not now) where it is more of family of viruses with quite a bit of variation that requires vaccines be reformulated every year.

And, of course, if the immunity provided by the vaccine lasts for some time, that will also work to keep the virus's spread low and not require frequent reinoculation. I posted that report yesterday about new research showing the post-infection immunity appears to be very good (contrary to some earlier anecdotes about re-infection), perhaps even immunity for many years. If the vaccine does the same, that would be hugely helpful in actually eliminating the virus from circulation. Like, at all.
 

Eeyore

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My question is will it be a one time shot,or require yearly vaccinations like the flu.
It's a good question. Let's hope that it's less like the flu (as the Facebook physicians tell us) and more like MMR. I remember my high school (late 80's) herding us into the gym and giving us a MMR shot regardless of our vaccination history because of an outbreak but I don't think that it was because of a mutation but more of the result of a large enough percentage of students not being vaccinated that herd immunity wasn't possible.
 

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