COVID-19 Outbreak Information Updates (Reboot) [13,137,962 US cases, 268,219 US deaths.] (28 Viewers)

Dan in Lafayette

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The original COVID-19 Outbreak thread has been closed but is still available as a read-only thread (sticky above). The original thread had become less and less about new information and more about petty bickering. The purpose of this new thread is to link or report new information as it comes out. Try not to go off course from the topic. Those of you who had been banned from the original thread feel free to participate in this new thread. Just stay on topic. Thank you.
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Edit - Andrus:
Bottom line is that moving forward we simply don't want any political bickering going on within this thread, and want to try to limit this thread to being as much about sharing Covid-19 information as possible.

If you want to discuss the political aspects of Covid-19 with other SR members, you can do so here (If you are not already registered there, you will be required to do so)...
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UPDATED TRACKER LINKS:

 

faceman

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It's a good question. Let's hope that it's less like the flu (as the Facebook physicians tell us) and more like MMR. I remember my high school (late 80's) herding us into the gym and giving us a MMR shot regardless of our vaccination history because of an outbreak but I don't think that it was because of a mutation but more of the result of a large enough percentage of students not being vaccinated that herd immunity wasn't possible.
I remember being pulled out of class in the first grade and all 1st grade students being lined up in the hallway to receive
the smallpox vaccination. This aggressive world wide action eradicated the disease. Due to the anti vaccer crowd now, I
don't see that happening with covid.
 

Optimus Prime

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Just fork irresponsible people. Fork em all. I've stayed home and done what I've had to do as best I can. Seeing idiots running around with no masks, hosting parties and generally putting others at risk is just stupid. You have Sturgis, and leaders of states saying "freedomz!" Yeah, you're free to kill people. It's just proof positive that after 10 months, people care more about themselves than they do their neighbors and country.

I've said this before and probably will say it again, when you put party (or your team/tribe) ahead of country, your priorities are whack.

Idiots close to home
=========================

A gun show promoter, a firearms dealer, and a prospective gun show attendee have sued the state of Virginia, asking for an exemption to allow for a large 25,000-person indoor gun show to be held at the Dulles Expo Center.

Because the event is scheduled for this weekend, the case is moving quickly and a hearing has been scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

Currently, in Virginia, social gatherings of more than 250 people are not allowed per Phase 3 guidelines..................


 

buzd

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Idiots close to home
=========================

A gun show promoter, a firearms dealer, and a prospective gun show attendee have sued the state of Virginia, asking for an exemption to allow for a large 25,000-person indoor gun show to be held at the Dulles Expo Center.

Because the event is scheduled for this weekend, the case is moving quickly and a hearing has been scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

Currently, in Virginia, social gatherings of more than 250 people are not allowed per Phase 3 guidelines..................


Well it's a new form of gun control.
 

bonnjer

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Idiots close to home
=========================

A gun show promoter, a firearms dealer, and a prospective gun show attendee have sued the state of Virginia, asking for an exemption to allow for a large 25,000-person indoor gun show to be held at the Dulles Expo Center.

Because the event is scheduled for this weekend, the case is moving quickly and a hearing has been scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

Currently, in Virginia, social gatherings of more than 250 people are not allowed per Phase 3 guidelines..................


So social gatherings of 250 aren't good, but they want something 100x larger indoors? Cool. I can't see how that could go wrong.
 

Saints318

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Here's some more good news.
At least it's not quite as deadly as it once was.

“All of our patients in the community are testing positive, but they’re not sick enough to be in the hospital,” he explained. “The percentage of patients that are sick enough to be in the hospital has actually gone down.”

“We’ve learned how to better care for them. So we’ve got some things that we know work. And we’ve got some things that we were using that we know don’t really work.”
 

Optimus Prime

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Quick vaccine question:

How is it that the Moderna vaccine is good for 30 days in your kitchen refrigerator but the Pfizer one has to be at like -50 degrees?
 

J.T.

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My question is will it be a one time shot,or require yearly vaccinations like the flu.
From what we know now, the thinking is that the mRNA vaccines should provide years of protection. Once the body has been "programed" to fight the disease, it will remember. The three earliest vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna and hopefully AstraZeneca, are all two shot deals. One shot and a second shot 28 days or 21 days later, depending on the vaccine.) The way the mRNA vaccines have been developed, they should kill this puppy pretty good and give many years of protection. They don't know for sure yet, but that is the best thinking out there right now. I don't know for sure on the Astra vaccine, but I would guess it will provide years also. (Look at this as probably more like the Mumps or Measles as opposed to the seasonal flu for vaccine purposes. Again, nobody knows for certain yet.)
 

Complex Kid

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Quick vaccine question:

How is it that the Moderna vaccine is good for 30 days in your kitchen refrigerator but the Pfizer one has to be at like -50 degrees?


Vaccines made from mRNA can be made much faster than older vaccines could, explains Margaret Liu, a vaccine researcher who chairs the board of the International Society for Vaccines and specializes in genetic vaccines. The problem, says Liu, is that mRNA is "really easily destroyed, and that's because there are many, many enzymes that will just break it apart."

Here's an analogy: Think of the vaccine as a chocolate bar that melts easily. Just as there are ways to keep the chocolate from melting into goo, there are things the drugmakers did to protect their COVID-19 vaccines.


The first step, Liu says, was to modify the mRNA nucleosides — the "building blocks" of the RNA vaccine. "They've used modified versions because those are more stable," she says. This would be like changing the chocolate recipe so it's not quite so melty.

The next step was to use lipid nanoparticles, which, Liu explains, "is kind of like putting your chocolate inside a candy coating — you have an M&M, so the chocolate doesn't melt."

But even with the stabilized building blocks and lipid coating, the mRNA could still fall apart easily, which is why the vaccine is frozen.

"Everything happens more slowly as you lower the temperature," Liu says. "So your chemical reactions — the enzymes that break down RNA — are going to happen more slowly." It's the same idea as freezing food to keep it from spoiling.

 

J.T.

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Quick vaccine question:

How is it that the Moderna vaccine is good for 30 days in your kitchen refrigerator but the Pfizer one has to be at like -50 degrees?
Great question. Easy answer, Moderna is an mRNA company, that is what they do. (No products yet, but lots of scientists.) Pfizer, may not have made some mRNA that was as stable when it gets warmer. mRNA just breaks apart fast once it warms up.

Second answer....some Tacoes are better than other Tacoes. SR lore there......
 

Saints318

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Vaccines made from mRNA can be made much faster than older vaccines could, explains Margaret Liu, a vaccine researcher who chairs the board of the International Society for Vaccines and specializes in genetic vaccines. The problem, says Liu, is that mRNA is "really easily destroyed, and that's because there are many, many enzymes that will just break it apart."

Here's an analogy: Think of the vaccine as a chocolate bar that melts easily. Just as there are ways to keep the chocolate from melting into goo, there are things the drugmakers did to protect their COVID-19 vaccines.


The first step, Liu says, was to modify the mRNA nucleosides — the "building blocks" of the RNA vaccine. "They've used modified versions because those are more stable," she says. This would be like changing the chocolate recipe so it's not quite so melty.

The next step was to use lipid nanoparticles, which, Liu explains, "is kind of like putting your chocolate inside a candy coating — you have an M&M, so the chocolate doesn't melt."

But even with the stabilized building blocks and lipid coating, the mRNA could still fall apart easily, which is why the vaccine is frozen.

"Everything happens more slowly as you lower the temperature," Liu says. "So your chemical reactions — the enzymes that break down RNA — are going to happen more slowly." It's the same idea as freezing food to keep it from spoiling.
Fascinating.

So what temperature is it at the time of injection? How do they raise the temperature to that point?
 

St. Widge

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Idiots close to home
=========================

A gun show promoter, a firearms dealer, and a prospective gun show attendee have sued the state of Virginia, asking for an exemption to allow for a large 25,000-person indoor gun show to be held at the Dulles Expo Center.

Because the event is scheduled for this weekend, the case is moving quickly and a hearing has been scheduled for 10:00 a.m. Thursday morning.

Currently, in Virginia, social gatherings of more than 250 people are not allowed per Phase 3 guidelines..................



Brings a whole new meaning to the phrase "you can have my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hand."
 
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Here's some more good news.
At least it's not quite as deadly as it once was.
Good news is every person I know who has gotten it hasn't gone to the hospital... so hopefully the majority of cases stay that way and perhaps a slight immunity is happening?
 

Complex Kid

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Good news is every person I know who has gotten it hasn't gone to the hospital... so hopefully the majority of cases stay that way and perhaps a slight immunity is happening?
If I had to guess more people wearing masks also helps decrease the "viral load" for people that do come in contact with the infected making it less sever.
 

Goatman Saint

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Fascinating.

So what temperature is it at the time of injection? How do they raise the temperature to that point?
Long term storage is that cold. Short term it can be in a freezer, then usually it’s warmed either on the counter for a few min or left to sit in the syringe for a brief amount to get warm enough for injection. It probably could be given cold (peanut butter antibiotic shot in the military) but that’s kinda uncomfortable.
 

Goatman Saint

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If I had to guess more people wearing masks also helps decrease the "viral load" for people that do come in contact with the infected making it less sever.
That’s one of the guesses. Less viral load to begin with. Also coming off the summer when people’s vitamin D is higher, and more people are taking that supplement. The steroid they are using has had pretty remarkable results also, it’s what kept my in-laws out of the hospital.
 

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