COVID-19 Outbreak Information Updates (Reboot) 33,544,983 US cases, 596,880 US deaths.] (10 Viewers)

Dan in Lafayette

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The original COVID-19 Outbreak thread has been closed but is still available as a read-only thread (sticky above). The original thread had become less and less about new information and more about petty bickering. The purpose of this new thread is to link or report new information as it comes out. Try not to go off course from the topic. Those of you who had been banned from the original thread feel free to participate in this new thread. Just stay on topic. Thank you.
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Edit - Andrus:
Bottom line is that moving forward we simply don't want any political bickering going on within this thread, and want to try to limit this thread to being as much about sharing Covid-19 information as possible.

If you want to discuss the political aspects of Covid-19 with other SR members, you can do so here (If you are not already registered there, you will be required to do so)...
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showtimesaints

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Just my two cents, but this pandemic has taught us who’s willing to help and who isn’t. Those that continue to stomp and beat their chest on not following the recommendations are clear think for themselvers and not wanting to help. Those that are following the guidelines are pulling together for a greater cause.
That’s what this pandemic is teaching us.
 

bonnjer

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Doctors say the patients coming through their doors are unvaccinated 30- to 50-year-olds.

Got the shot, people!
 

DaveXA

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So...I don't normally watch MLS, but this Seattle vs LA game, Seattle just scored, and the player who scored the first goal runs to the seats behind the goal and gets in a big group hug with fans. Really? I guess Covid isn't a thing anymore? :covri:
 

superchuck500

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So...I don't normally watch MLS, but this Seattle vs LA game, Seattle just scored, and the player who scored the first goal runs to the seats behind the goal and gets in a big group hug with fans. Really? I guess Covid isn't a thing anymore? :covri:

I didn’t see the clip but the whole Seattle team and staff are fully vaccinated per recent announcement- and they were actually having a vaccine drive at that game. You could even pick between Moderna or J&J.
 

DaveXA

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I didn’t see the clip but the whole Seattle team and staff are fully vaccinated per recent announcement- and they were actually having a vaccine drive at that game. You could even pick between Moderna or J&J.
That's good to know. Just not used to seeing fans and athletes interact like that yet. I just want to be sure the messaging is still that this thing isn't quite over yet and we still need to act accordingly.

That said, if they're all vaccinated, I'm good with it.
 

CowtownSaint

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Welp Alberta has the highest infection rate per capita than anywhere it seems I believe the world! I know it’s shattering a India’s rate. So many absolute idiots, morons and conspiracy bumpkins up here. It’s getting to the point I’m sick to my stomach how incapable we are of doing what’s right for the greater good and the common man. Just sick to my stomach up here.
 

SaintInBucLand

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So...I don't normally watch MLS, but this Seattle vs LA game, Seattle just scored, and the player who scored the first goal runs to the seats behind the goal and gets in a big group hug with fans. Really? I guess Covid isn't a thing anymore? :covri:

God forbid somebody be excited they scored a goal and wanted to share the moment with some very excited fans.
 

superchuck500

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Welp Alberta has the highest infection rate per capita than anywhere it seems I believe the world! I know it’s shattering a India’s rate. So many absolute idiots, morons and conspiracy bumpkins up here. It’s getting to the point I’m sick to my stomach how incapable we are of doing what’s right for the greater good and the common man. Just sick to my stomach up here.

Hang in there man, looks bad up there.

It looks like Alberta’s wave is variant-driven primarily B.1.1.7, as is India’s and Michigan’s for that matter. The experts have predicted that this spring would be new surge except in places with relatively high vaccination. And due to variants, these surges could be pretty bad (greater infectiousness and severity).

Some scenes from Alberta:


 

livefromDC

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has there been any research into the reason for the difference between kids and adults?

i remember reading about the possibility of the "immaturity" of a childs immune system, but dont recall any recent articles about studies showing if there has been additional research.

It sounds easy and it probably is that due to the "newness " of a childs immune system and being able to recognize just about anything, it starts to work immediately on COVID whereas adult immune systems are "programmed" over decades to react to things it has seen before, so response to a novel virus is not as quick.

This doesnt accurately depict how immunology works. Its not the immaturity of the child's immune system which has been linked to a decreased incidence of illness. Instead it's a child's immature respiratory system, the target for COVID-19. That and the lack of comorbidities in children.

Viruses tend to be overwhelmingly receptor specific. If the receptor that a virus is supposed to bind to doesn't exist, is deformed, preoccupied, or immature, the virus can't attach to it. Attachment is key. Thankfully it appears that COVID is currently predisposed to attaching to mature endothelial cells. As it goes with viruses, that can change in a heartbeat if we continue to unnecessarily expose children to the virus because they don't get sick.

COVID-19 is novel in that it departed from what we knew about Coronaviruses up until last year which led to a lot of confusion about how the virus is spread, but it still totally behaves like a virus.
 

efil4stnias

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This doesnt accurately depict how immunology works. Its not the immaturity of the child's immune system which has been linked to a decreased incidence of illness. Instead it's a child's immature respiratory system, the target for COVID-19. That and the lack of comorbidities in children.

Viruses tend to be overwhelmingly receptor specific. If the receptor that a virus is supposed to bind to doesn't exist, is deformed, preoccupied, or immature, the virus can't attach to it. Attachment is key. Thankfully it appears that COVID is currently predisposed to attaching to mature endothelial cells. As it goes with viruses, that can change in a heartbeat if we continue to unnecessarily expose children to the virus because they don't get sick.

COVID-19 is novel in that it departed from what we knew about Coronaviruses up until last year which led to a lot of confusion about how the virus is spread, but it still totally behaves like a virus.

That makes even more sense and is really interesting.
The article I recalled was mid 2020, so I'm sure there was much supposition as studies were just getting going.
Thanks for posting that as I am Def going to read more about.
 

Optimus Prime

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Early in the pandemic, when vaccines for the coronavirus were still just a glimmer on the horizon, the term “herd immunity” came to signify the endgame: the point when enough Americans would be protected from the virus so we could be rid of the pathogen and reclaim our lives.

Now, more than half of adults in the United States have been inoculated with at least one dose of a vaccine. But daily vaccination rates are slipping, and there is widespread consensus among scientists and public health experts that the herd immunity threshold is not attainable — at least not in the foreseeable future, and perhaps not ever.

Instead, they are coming to the conclusion that rather than making a long-promised exit, the virus will most likely become a manageable threat that will continue to circulate in the United States for years to come, still causing hospitalizations and deaths but in much smaller numbers.

How much smaller is uncertain and depends in part on how much of the nation, and the world, becomes vaccinated and how the coronavirus evolves. It is already clear, however, that the virus is changing too quickly, new variants are spreading too easily and vaccination is proceeding too slowly for herd immunity to be within reach anytime soon.

Continued immunizations, especially for people at highest risk because of age, exposure or health status, will be crucial to limiting the severity of outbreaks, if not their frequency, experts believe.

“The virus is unlikely to go away,” said Rustom Antia, an evolutionary biologist at Emory University in Atlanta. “But we want to do all we can to check that it’s likely to become a mild infection.”

The shift in outlook presents a new challenge for public health authorities. The drive for herd immunity — by the summer, some experts once thought possible — captured the imagination of large segments of the public. To say the goal will not be attained adds another “why bother” to the list of reasons that vaccine skeptics use to avoid being inoculated.

Yet vaccinations remain the key to transforming the virus into a controllable threat, experts said.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the Biden administration’s top adviser on Covid-19, acknowledged the shift in experts’ thinking.

“People were getting confused and thinking you’re never going to get the infections down until you reach this mystical level of herd immunity, whatever that number is,” he said.

“That’s why we stopped using herd immunity in the classic sense,” he added. “I’m saying: Forget that for a second. You vaccinate enough people, the infections are going to go down.”.............

 
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efil4stnias

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Early in the pandemic, when vaccines for the coronavirus were still just a glimmer on the horizon, the term “herd immunity” came to signify the endgame: the point when enough Americans would be protected from the virus so we could be rid of the pathogen and reclaim our lives.

Now, more than half of adults in the United States have been inoculated with at least one dose of a vaccine. But daily vaccination rates are slipping, and there is widespread consensus among scientists and public health experts that the herd immunity threshold is not attainable — at least not in the foreseeable future, and perhaps not ever.

Instead, they are coming to the conclusion that rather than making a long-promised exit, the virus will most likely become a manageable threat that will continue to circulate in the United States for years to come, still causing hospitalizations and deaths but in much smaller numbers.

How much smaller is uncertain and depends in part on how much of the nation, and the world, becomes vaccinated and how the coronavirus evolves. It is already clear, however, that the virus is changing too quickly, new variants are spreading too easily and vaccination is proceeding too slowly for herd immunity to be within reach anytime soon.

Continued immunizations, especially for people at highest risk because of age, exposure or health status, will be crucial to limiting the severity of outbreaks, if not their frequency, experts believe.

“The virus is unlikely to go away,” said Rustom Antia, an evolutionary biologist at Emory University in Atlanta. “But we want to do all we can to check that it’s likely to become a mild infection.”

The shift in outlook presents a new challenge for public health authorities. The drive for herd immunity — by the summer, some experts once thought possible — captured the imagination of large segments of the public. To say the goal will not be attained adds another “why bother” to the list of reasons that vaccine skeptics use to avoid being inoculated...................


I think @superchuck500 posted last week about the move to finding therapies now. The mindset has has shifted and that was the "canary in the coal mine" so to speak. When pharma moves to therapeutics, the virus will be with us for a while.

I hope they find some reliable and sustaining therapies to combat severe illness in folks.

with the incident rate of the flu having come way down, wonder if Covid will be the new "flu" annually?
 

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