COVID-19 Outbreak Information Updates (Reboot) 35,147,918 US cases, 625,852 US deaths.] (60 Viewers)

efil4stnias

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I don't know if this has already been discussed but are the long haul symptoms tied to the severity of covid?

If you're vaccinated, get covid but it's mild or asymptomatic does that mean you're out of the woods for any long term effects?

define "mild"

my sister had what was deemed "mild" since it didnt require hospitalization. But she described as bad flu.

then came the long covid symptoms post recovery. They are waning ( now 4 months out ) to very little, but the first 3 months was pretty hellish in that each day was something different. One constant was fatigue. Like "im not getting out of bed" fatigue.

She still goes every 30 days for ekg/o2 checks, neuro checks etc. She will until 1 full year symptom free. So i think its more tied to strain/person than the severity parts.
 

SaintRob

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Mr. Blue Sky

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efil4stnias

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Ironically enough- these people who are refusing to get vaccinated are now INFRINGING UPON MY FORKING FREEDOM.



God****** we live in a country full of selfish Aholes.

they were always aholes, but their "ahole-ness" was sub-surface. Never really surfaced unless faced with perceived injustice.

Now its on full display. Like a peacock in mating season. That plumage is their "display of bad assery/alpha " ( beta for you Karens out there )

im so over all of it.
 

hockey2112

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I'm starting to think breakthroughs are way more common than we're being led to believe. It's tough to tell because the CDC stopped tracking non severe breakthroughs.. But as long as protection against serious illness and death remain sufficient I guess we'll just have to deal.

I am currently witnessing a breakthrough case. My neighbors (husband and wife) were vaccinated with Pfizer. 43 years old, 4 kids (kids not vaccinated; two of the 4 are old enough). One kid (teen) brought it home with minor cold symptoms. Passed it to Mom and two other kids. The two other kids had cold-like symptoms. Dad and the fourth kid (teen) have tested negative every time, and no symptoms.

The mom started feeling very crappy last Thursday night. Mid-grade fever, malaise, aches, etc. Not much respiratory involvement, if any. She finally started feeling better yesterday for the most part, but now today she confirms that she can barely taste and smell.

My wife and I are vaccinated (Moderna), so it has been very concerning to see an up-close first-hand example of breakthrough. But we (and they) all believe that it could have been far worse had our neighbor not been vaccinated.
 
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Ironically enough- these people who are refusing to get vaccinated are now INFRINGING UPON MY FORKING FREEDOM.



God****** we live in a country full of selfish Aholes.

I have a feeling Mayor Cantrell is going to be giving some stern warnings here in about 57mins about getting vaccinated.
 

SaintsFanInLA

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Was vaccinated on April 1, today was the first day that the injection site REALLY started acting up. Swelling, tenderness, soreness. That's highly unusual, isn't it? Over three months later, having a reaction? Now, I just started bike riding for the past few days and may have burned some fat. Maybe some of the vaccine was released due to fat loss. I don't know but this seems weird to me. Don't get me wrong, I had injection site soreness for about 3 days initially but it faded. This is just...again, weird.
 

Doug B

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So when a scientist tries to convince me that a medical intervention is important for that age group, it makes me wonder exactly why. Are we really trying to help children, or are we trying to help an 86 year old in a nursing home that chose to not get vaccinated?
My understanding is that in the case of pandemic ... you want to evaluate vaccination at a society-wide level, not as the sum of all of the individuals.

What would win me over that small children should NOT be vaccinated is if can be established that SARS-CoV-2 does not multiply in children in sufficient numbers/rates to significantly increase the number of mutations that lead to more dangerous variants. In different terms: are children effective reservoirs for SARS-CoV-2 mutations, yes or no?

Basically, if it becomes consensus that most all pediatric COVID infections are defeated quickly by the child's immune system, that changes the game. Otherwise, IMHO it's a call to arms for all available immune systems -- young and old, men, women, children, and babes in arms.

One thing that I do know is that children have fewer ACE2 receptors in their nasal passages and trachea than adults. This has been one of the leading theories as to why COVID is so much less impactful children. If this also means that the SARS-CoV-2 virions don't spend a lot of time replicating themselves in the bodies of children, then OK -- maybe pediatric COVID vaccination can be tabled for now.

...

For my 14-year-old son, one back-of-my-mind reason I wanted him vaccinated** is that I am hopeful that he'll actually have really long-lasting improved COVID protection even after the specific antibodies are gone. I am hoping that prior exposure to the mRNA vaccine can help his immune system 20-30 years down the line if he is exposed to COVID. No, this is not known yet, and no researcher will speculate in public about it -- yet I remain hopeful.

It was reasonably speculated (but I don't think proven hard) that exposure to prior legacy coronaviruses (those existing before SARS) did help ward off the worst of COVID symptoms in those exposed. Based on that, I don't believe it is left-field crazy talk that a 2021 COVID vaccination (plus whatever boosters in the future) can make a difference for decades to come.


** He was very much eager to get the vaccine -- not a moment's hesitation once eligible.
 

hockey2112

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Was vaccinated on April 1, today was the first day that the injection site REALLY started acting up. Swelling, tenderness, soreness. That's highly unusual, isn't it? Over three months later, having a reaction? Now, I just started bike riding for the past few days and may have burned some fat. Maybe some of the vaccine was released due to fat loss. I don't know but this seems weird to me. Don't get me wrong, I had injection site soreness for about 3 days initially but it faded. This is just...again, weird.
Delayed microchip activation?

Seriously though, that is a bit odd. Never heard of that before.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

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But we (and they) all believe that it could have been far worse had our neighbor not been vaccinated.




Maybe I am misinformed, but yeah i thought it was true that the vaccine doesnt stop one from *catching* Covid, the vaccine just makes the symptoms far less severe, makes you far less likely to die and (possibly ?) makes you less likely to spread it to someone else.
 

Doug B

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I don't know if this has already been discussed but are the long haul symptoms tied to the severity of covid?

If you're vaccinated, get covid but it's mild or asymptomatic does that mean you're out of the woods for any long term effects?
My understanding is "not really". It's kind of hazy and chaotic, though. I don't believe that asymptomatic or light cases typically lead to severe long-haul symptoms, though.

Are loss of taste/smell, fatigue, and concentration difficulties light long-haul symptoms, or no? That's kind of a consideration, too -- what symptoms are we 'comfortable' dealing with for several months? That kind of stuff is a big reason I want to avoid COVID very badly -- already got enough stuff to deal with health-wise. I can't offer up much more energy or concentration capacity as it is (not a joke).
 

Doug B

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Was vaccinated on April 1, today was the first day that the injection site REALLY started acting up. Swelling, tenderness, soreness. That's highly unusual, isn't it? Over three months later, having a reaction?
Ask your doctor, but:

This is a potential sign that your body is fighting off an asymptomatic COVID infection.

Rationale: Many people who received their mRNA vaccinations in opposite arms reported soreness in the first injection site after their second vaccination dose.
 

ThibodauxSaint

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Maybe I am misinformed, but yeah i thought it was true that the vaccine doesnt stop one from *catching* Covid, the vaccine just makes the symptoms far less severe, makes you far less likely to die and (possibly ?) makes you less likely to spread it to someone else.

That's the way I understand it. I think that's how all vaccines work. A few years ago I got a pneumonia vaccine and I remember the doctor telling me that it didn't mean I wouldn't catch pneumonia just that if I did catch it wouldn't be bad enough to kill me.
 

SaintsFanInLA

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Ask your doctor, but:

This is a potential sign that your body is fighting off an asymptomatic COVID infection.

Rationale: Many people who received their mRNA vaccinations in opposite arms reported soreness in the first injection site after their second vaccination dose.
That was one of my first thoughts. That MAYBE I have contracted COVID and now the vaccine has been activated somehow. I don't know. But it SEEMS reasonable.
 

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