Do You Say the Pledge of Allegiance? (1 Viewer)

FootballLady

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I realize that a lot of us don't have the opportunity to say it as adults so this may be a non-issue for most of you, but for those of us who teach in private or parochial schools the Pledge is still a part of our day. I haven't been able to say the Pledge in good conscience since the Senate report on torture came out several years ago and my Principal has been fine with that since I'm still standing and being respectful. There are some parents, though, who seem to be upset by this. My question to you all is not about my situation, per se, as my job isn't in peril or anything. What I'd like to know is if given the opportunity, would you still say it?
 

Goatman Saint

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To me it’s one of those rituals I really just don’t care about one way or another as a teacher. I mean most kids don’t even know the words, don’t know the meaning, nor do they care it’s just something they have been programmed to do.

Really what’s the point? If it’s broken down to it’s essence you are pledging allegiance to America. What does that mean? You won’t be a traitor? I don’t really get the practical aspect of it when I stop and think about it.

I will say it, but I always drop out the under god part. My parents both threw a fit when I talked about it with them as they both said “we used under god when we said it”. Um no guys you didnt. It was added in 54, And my parents were seniors in high school.
 

N.O.Bronco

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It’s a questionable form of idolatry, especially when we injected “under god” during the red scare, that doesn’t really seem appropriate in a school setting.


Ultimately though it’s perceived benefits or consequences are almost certainly immaterial since its participants, those it’s meant to influence, always seemed more annoyed and detached doing it than anything, so it doesn’t really get me all that bothered.
 

N.O.Bronco

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For those who don’t participate, do you join in on the Who Dat cheer? In similar fashion, it’s an allegiance to a unified entity.
I’ve made my feelings known already, but...

I’d hope you could see the different ethical questions involved between attempted forced(at times mandatory) state idolatry and voluntarily shared expressions indicating team camaraderie.
 
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FootballLady

FootballLady

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For those who don’t participate, do you join in on the Who Dat cheer? In similar fashion, it’s an allegiance to a unified entity.
To be fair, if I'd learned that the Saints were systematically torturing prisoners, I wouldn't say the Who Dat chant either.
 

SharonT

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I absolutely say the pledge every school day. Every word. And no, I've never had a problem with students if they stand or not, join or not, as long as they are quiet and not distracting others.

To me, "the flag" is symbolic, and those words carry no weight. It is a visual reminder and cue.

"The Republic, for which is stands," is where the power is - for all of us.

"One nation," - look out for each other, like family.

"Under God" - even though it was a late add-on, and for the wrong reasons, I've come to terms with it. Instead of a blurring of the line between church and state as it was intended, I see it as 'no man is above the law.' So, when autocrat-types proclaim brown children trying to flee poverty need to be separated from families and imprisoned, I think, "Who does he think he is? God?" No. "Under God" means to follow the Constitution and rule of law. We expect our politicians to be public servants, not lords or kings with divine powers. Simplistic, maybe. But true. If you're equal in the eyes of the law, you don't have the power (under our constitution) to act "like God," circumvent the laws, and expect to be treated like you're some kind of god. That is UnAmerican, to me.

"Indivisible" - The last two years has shown we are. Easily. Too many people bought into partisanship at the expense of democracy. Dividing is the hallmark of our current president, and the image of the gold star family keeps popping in my head. I wish our president would read the constitution. And follow it.

"For liberty and justice for all." - And this is why the pledge is important to say, to remind ourselves of the progress that's been made and the ultimate goal. Hold our elected officials to this basic standard.
 

Zztop

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A few months ago I got into a conversation with someone about this. Well actually they were ranting on how THEY (which could only mean leftist/liberal/democrats!!) were trying to make it illegal (I think they said illegal) for schools to have the pledge in the mornings. I asked for a direct citation of that info or where they got that info (I was provided none). I then tried to point out that not everyone believes in god, and perhaps it would go against their beliefs to say "one nation under god" to which I just got more ranting about how THEY wanted to make the USA immoral or something.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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To me it’s one of those rituals I really just don’t care about one way or another as a teacher. I mean most kids don’t even know the words, don’t know the meaning, nor do they care it’s just something they have been programmed to do.

Really what’s the point? If it’s broken down to it’s essence you are pledging allegiance to America. What does that mean? You won’t be a traitor? I don’t really get the practical aspect of it when I stop and think about it.
these are the exact reasons i don't say the pledge (i will stand but not recite or put hand over heart) - -i feel more american by not taking a fealty oath
 

Goatman Saint

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“They” have never said anything of the sort. I’ve never heard a complaint about the pledge other than the term “under god”. The under god is usually due to religious reasons, to which I have no issue with. If a person doesn’t believe in the Christian god, or doesn’t believe in god, or the religions who believe that they can’t take an oath because their religion forbids it then, of course it’s up to them. I personally don’t say that part as it was put in as a Christian better than you to the atheist communists during the red scare days. To say it means anything else is factually wrong. However, I don’t care, say that part or not, makes no difference to me.

Once again also, without turning this into a religious thread, every religion has a moral code in it, some stronger than the Christian religion. Even atheists and non believers have a moral code of right and wrong.
 

Charlie Brizzown

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these are the exact reasons i don't say the pledge (i will stand but not recite or put hand over heart) - -i feel more american by not taking a fealty oath
This is what I do and how I feel about it. Very early in school I found the pledge to be a bit creepy, and the frequency of it made it seem cult like. It reminded me of some very religious family situations where they’d sit around reciting Hail Mary’s for an hour at a time.
 

mt15

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I’ve always said it, but we said it every morning in elementary school, so I was used to it. Never really got upset or concerned about it.

Also have zero issues with anyone who chooses not to participate. It’s a free country.
 

Heathen Saint

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I was forced to say it in the small private Christian school I grew up in.

I don't think i'd say it now, just because, as it's been said -- it seems more contrived and cult-like/unnecessary.

I love my country, but i'd never recite something like that again and though I'm proud to be from America, I can't say it's something I'm beaming. I do understand how immigrant families would feel more patriotic having made their way here and escaped inhumane conditions and made a life for themselves, and that's incredible. Maybe it's a product of American laziness, maybe it's just that I don't feel the need or want to boast.

I think the only thing i'd ever pledge allegiance to is humanity
 

Yoweigh

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I don't say the pledge, but I sing the anthem mostly because I like having an excuse to sing loudly in public.
 

Saint_Ward

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When I am presented with the rare time to participate, I do.

The public elementary does it here. Dont think middle or HS does.
 

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