Do You Say the Pledge of Allegiance? (1 Viewer)

FootballLady

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I realize that a lot of us don't have the opportunity to say it as adults so this may be a non-issue for most of you, but for those of us who teach in private or parochial schools the Pledge is still a part of our day. I haven't been able to say the Pledge in good conscience since the Senate report on torture came out several years ago and my Principal has been fine with that since I'm still standing and being respectful. There are some parents, though, who seem to be upset by this. My question to you all is not about my situation, per se, as my job isn't in peril or anything. What I'd like to know is if given the opportunity, would you still say it?
 

DadsDream

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In the 1960s, we recited it every morning, led by a different student each day over the schoolwide speaker system.
The impression I recall is that it was something required and forced on us by the Yankees after we lost the Civil War, hence the "indivisible" part.
I'm not kidding.
 

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Personally I struggle with anything which has even the faintest whiff of groupthink. I have deep resentment of being told what to do Whether the cause is noble or otherwise so I would struggle with this.

Brits like me are probably too non conformist by nature for an oath of allegiance, particularly since ours would probably have a grovel to the unelected monarchy clause.
 

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Personally I struggle with anything which has even the faintest whiff of groupthink. I have deep resentment of being told what to do Whether the cause is noble or otherwise so I would struggle with this.

Brits like me are probably too non conformist by nature for an oath of allegiance, particularly since ours would probably have a grovel to the unelected monarchy clause.
I have been known to be contrarian myself and hate being told what I must do. As an adult, however, the only time I can recall that reciting the pledge was at City Council meetings. It was a once or twice a month thing that enabled me to focus on the meaning behind the words and my responsibilities as an elected official. I never had a problem with it and actually liked that we did it. A fellow council member (now the mayor) would stand, but not say the pledge. I respected his right not to say it, but there was an undercurrent of disapproval. I pointed out that whether it was for religious reasons or personal reasons, as a free American, he is entitled to participate in the recitation or not. He showed respect by standing, but remained true to whatever belief that compelled him to decline participation.

Sharon's post reflects much of my thinking and there is no way I could have said it as well.
 
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mt15

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In the 1960s, we recited it every morning, led by a different student each day over the schoolwide speaker system.
The impression I recall is that it was something required and forced on us by the Yankees after we lost the Civil War, hence the "indivisible" part.
I'm not kidding.
It was required in pretty much every elementary school nationwide during that time frame. But if people want to think it was the Yankees, well, whatever.
 

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I absolutely say the pledge every school day. Every word. And no, I've never had a problem with students if they stand or not, join or not, as long as they are quiet and not distracting others.

To me, "the flag" is symbolic, and those words carry no weight. It is a visual reminder and cue.

"The Republic, for which is stands," is where the power is - for all of us.

"One nation," - look out for each other, like family.

"Under God" - even though it was a late add-on, and for the wrong reasons, I've come to terms with it. Instead of a blurring of the line between church and state as it was intended, I see it as 'no man is above the law.' So, when autocrat-types proclaim brown children trying to flee poverty need to be separated from families and imprisoned, I think, "Who does he think he is? God?" No. "Under God" means to follow the Constitution and rule of law. We expect our politicians to be public servants, not lords or kings with divine powers. Simplistic, maybe. But true. If you're equal in the eyes of the law, you don't have the power (under our constitution) to act "like God," circumvent the laws, and expect to be treated like you're some kind of god. That is UnAmerican, to me.

"Indivisible" - The last two years has shown we are. Easily. Too many people bought into partisanship at the expense of democracy. Dividing is the hallmark of our current president, and the image of the gold star family keeps popping in my head. I wish our president would read the constitution. And follow it.

"For liberty and justice for all." - And this is why the pledge is important to say, to remind ourselves of the progress that's been made and the ultimate goal. Hold our elected officials to this basic standard.
What she said. (y)
 

DadsDream

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It was required in pretty much every elementary school nationwide during that time frame. But if people want to think it was the Yankees, well, whatever.
I understand that.
Most the children in that classroom were direct descendants of soldiers that had to recite a loyalty oath because they bore arms against the Union.
That's how it was explained at the time . . . comparable to the loyalty oath sworn by our predecessors.
 

bigdaddysaints

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what I find funny are the ones who are so adamant about it, especially the ones who want it forced, are the ones who fly the Confederate Flag in the background. they pledge allegiance to the US Flag but would prefer if the Confederate Flag was the one they were pledging to.
 

rajncajn

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I say it because I support our country, the ideals it was founded upon and it's people. What the government does or any govt entity has no bearing in that. I'm not pledging allegiance to a flag (idol) as some have put it. I'm pledging allegiance to the ideals that flag stands for and the people who fought for it from the soldiers on Bunker Hill to the immigrants who gave our nation form.
 

rajncajn

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I absolutely say the pledge every school day. Every word. And no, I've never had a problem with students if they stand or not, join or not, as long as they are quiet and not distracting others.

To me, "the flag" is symbolic, and those words carry no weight. It is a visual reminder and cue.

"The Republic, for which is stands," is where the power is - for all of us.

"One nation," - look out for each other, like family.

"Under God" - even though it was a late add-on, and for the wrong reasons, I've come to terms with it. Instead of a blurring of the line between church and state as it was intended, I see it as 'no man is above the law.' So, when autocrat-types proclaim brown children trying to flee poverty need to be separated from families and imprisoned, I think, "Who does he think he is? God?" No. "Under God" means to follow the Constitution and rule of law. We expect our politicians to be public servants, not lords or kings with divine powers. Simplistic, maybe. But true. If you're equal in the eyes of the law, you don't have the power (under our constitution) to act "like God," circumvent the laws, and expect to be treated like you're some kind of god. That is UnAmerican, to me.

"Indivisible" - The last two years has shown we are. Easily. Too many people bought into partisanship at the expense of democracy. Dividing is the hallmark of our current president, and the image of the gold star family keeps popping in my head. I wish our president would read the constitution. And follow it.

"For liberty and justice for all." - And this is why the pledge is important to say, to remind ourselves of the progress that's been made and the ultimate goal. Hold our elected officials to this basic standard.
Very well stated.
 
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FootballLady

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I say it because I support our country, the ideals it was founded upon and it's people. What the government does or any govt entity has no bearing in that. I'm not pledging allegiance to a flag (idol) as some have put it. I'm pledging allegiance to the ideals that flag stands for and the people who fought for it from the soldiers on Bunker Hill to the immigrants who gave our nation form.
"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the...and to the republic for which it stands." The words seem to be meant to be taken literally. It's telling you what you're doing and even what the flag represents.
 

rajncajn

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"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the...and to the republic for which it stands." The words seem to be meant to be taken literally. It's telling you what you're doing and even what the flag represents.
Not really. That would be pretty silly. Flags, especially national and state flags, are meant to be symbolic. So why then would anyone think that is meant to be taken literally? You're not pledging your allegiance to a piece of cloth, you're pledging to what it represents.
 

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