Do You Say the Pledge of Allegiance? (1 Viewer)

FootballLady

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I realize that a lot of us don't have the opportunity to say it as adults so this may be a non-issue for most of you, but for those of us who teach in private or parochial schools the Pledge is still a part of our day. I haven't been able to say the Pledge in good conscience since the Senate report on torture came out several years ago and my Principal has been fine with that since I'm still standing and being respectful. There are some parents, though, who seem to be upset by this. My question to you all is not about my situation, per se, as my job isn't in peril or anything. What I'd like to know is if given the opportunity, would you still say it?
 

mt15

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Yes, in the later years of elementary school we definitely had US history and civics classes that touched on all those subjects you mentioned. I just don’t remember ever having any reference to the Pledge. I mean, once you learn the concepts you can do your own thinking.

I guess what I’m getting at is that this learning can certainly take place whether the Pledge if recited or not. That’s why I am totally ambivalent on it. I don’t see the harm, but not really seeing a huge benefit either.
 

rajncajn

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Yes, in the later years of elementary school we definitely had US history and civics classes that touched on all those subjects you mentioned. I just don’t remember ever having any reference to the Pledge. I mean, once you learn the concepts you can do your own thinking.

I guess what I’m getting at is that this learning can certainly take place whether the Pledge if recited or not. That’s why I am totally ambivalent on it. I don’t see the harm, but not really seeing a huge benefit either.
Much of what you will see in an early elementary classroom would seem meaningless and ambivalent, but that is because a lot of it is simply teaching children structure. As I said earlier, laying the foundation for what they will learn later and just as importantly, how to learn. So what may seem like a mundane, meaningless exercise is actually a very important tool that is preparing them for the next step. What better time to introduce them to our society, even if it starts with just a simple recitement?
 

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