GM to unveil plug-in hybrid (1 Viewer)

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GM may revive the electric car
Automaker expects future success with technology of hybrids, batteries and hydrogen fuel cells.
David Shepardson / The Detroit News

WASHINGTON
-- General Motors Corp. is likely to unveil a prototype plug-in hybrid at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit as part of its company-wide focus on "electrifying" the car, GM officials said Thursday.

The advanced technology vehicle would have an extended driving range on battery power alone and would also have a diesel or gasoline engine that could power the car when the battery was low.

Later this month, GM chairman and CEO Rick Wagoner will deliver a speech at the Los Angeles Auto Show in which he will disclose that the linchpin to the company's turnaround is its emphasis on advanced technologies.

Ultimately, GM sees hydrogen fuel cells as the solution to ending the country's reliance on oil. However GM believes the key is using electricity -- through hybrids, batteries and hydrogen fuel cells -- to run vehicles, not gasoline.

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061110/AUTO01/611100327/1148


I hope they take this to production and the government helps with research and rebates. A plug-in hybrid plus 5-10k worth of solar panels would require almost no fossil fuel and contribute little pollution beyond production and disposal. With a few state and federal incentives most transportation energy costs could be eliminated.
 

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G M is reviving the electric car.

Decades old technology.

Toyota is testing fuel cell cars in California. G M says fuel cell techology is the future alternative to gasoline powered autos....

Is it any wonder Toyota is eating G M's lunch?

Joe
 
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This would involve a lot of new technology, it's too bad they killed the EV1 program and lost the research time. Plug-in hybrids are the future and an easy path to cheap clean energy. If they go with a series hybrid it should give them cost (cheaper than combo) and performance advantages. Can achieve 4s 0-60 performance and trucks with more torque than anything on the road (locomotives=series hybrids) today.
 

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This would involve a lot of new technology, it's too bad they killed the EV1 program and lost the research time. Plug-in hybrids are the future and an easy path to cheap clean energy. If they go with a series hybrid it should give them cost (cheaper than combo) and performance advantages. Can achieve 4s 0-60 performance and trucks with more torque than anything on the road (locomotives=series hybrids) today.
They killed the EV1 due to cost (no one was able to buy one, they were all leased and had to be returned to GM) and the fact that they weren't making a lot of progress with an electric only car. You should also factor in pathetic leadership from the top at the time.
Keep in mind that battery technology hasn't really progressed much either.
 
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Yeah, it was a flawed program with flawed leadership. They could've been in the lead right now if they focused on hybrid technology instead. I hope their design team picks something a bit more attractive this time also.

Lead acid has a lot of disadvantages, hopefully they can get affordable lithium-ion/polymer storage working in the 3 or 4 year timeframe. Tesla is using lithium-ion now but it counts for 1/4 of the sticker price. Going hybrid would reduce the battery requirements, just 50-100 miles of batt capacity would eliminate a lot consumption.
 

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Yeah, it was a flawed program with flawed leadership. They could've been in the lead right now if they focused on hybrid technology instead. I hope their design team picks something a bit more attractive this time also.

Lead acid has a lot of disadvantages, hopefully they can get affordable lithium-ion/polymer storage working in the 3 or 4 year timeframe. Tesla is using lithium-ion now but it counts for 1/4 of the sticker price. Going hybrid would reduce the battery requirements, just 50-100 miles of batt capacity would eliminate a lot consumption.
No doubt. You still have to overcome poor battery performance in cold weather though. The company that can do that (at a reasonable price) will go a long way towards increasing sales of hybrids and pure electrics.
There is only one problem...consumption won't go down by as much as some people think 9assuming that people start plugging in). Once a large number of people start plugging in thier cars consumption will shift to the utilities. Granted there are some efficiencies to be gained, but, as we saw in the past few summers, as electricity demand grows we will need to build more power plants. Lots of factors are needed to be overcome before that happens. What fuel then? Natural gas? Coal?, Nuclear? And of course, plain old NIMBY.
I think the future is still kind of muddy.
I bet hybrids (seen as transitional by some) will be the way to go for the forseeable future.
oops, now I'm rambling.
PUI
:)
 
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Fuel choice is easy for 3/4 of the nation. With today's hybrids it would take an average of about 20 125W solar panels to supply enough power for the 30 average miles driven per day. Cars would recharge at off peak night times with whatever grid electricity was available and the solar panels would be used for net metering to offset costs or profit.

With current energy costs and average MPG payback would be achieved in 5-10 years. Payback would be achieved in 1-3 years if you go by true cost estimates. Doesn't work as well for renters or homeowners in unfavorable locations, but incentives could be offered to businesses and parking lots to make up for that. Paying grid prices would be 50-90 cents/day for 30 AMPD. With a 100-200 mile capacity reliance on gasoline would be low and still >50mpg (for cars at least) when used.

$55 billion would completely subsidize solar panels for the 7.5 million passenger vehicles sold per year in the US. Over 10 years (for probably less than the cost of the Iraq war) 35% of drivers/vehicles could be virtually energy independent.

Cold and low sunlight in the north is an obstacle, we can sell them our old used gas guzzlers until hydrogen is ready.

Of course the numbers are rough and we couldn't immediately convert over 100%, but it wouldn't be hard to greatly reduce our consumption. With a bit of government backing and research the numbers would be even more favorable. I do hope we keep everyone addicted to gasoline/diesel/hydrogen a bit longer for selfish reasons though.
 

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Fuel choice is easy for 3/4 of the nation. With today's hybrids it would take an average of about 20 125W solar panels to supply enough power for the 30 average miles driven per day. Cars would recharge at off peak night times with whatever grid electricity was available and the solar panels would be used for net metering to offset costs or profit.

With current energy costs and average MPG payback would be achieved in 5-10 years. Payback would be achieved in 1-3 years if you go by true cost estimates. Doesn't work as well for renters or homeowners in unfavorable locations, but incentives could be offered to businesses and parking lots to make up for that. Paying grid prices would be 50-90 cents/day for 30 AMPD. With a 100-200 mile capacity reliance on gasoline would be low and still >50mpg (for cars at least) when used.

$55 billion would completely subsidize solar panels for the 7.5 million passenger vehicles sold per year in the US. Over 10 years (for probably less than the cost of the Iraq war) 35% of drivers/vehicles could be virtually energy independent.

Cold and low sunlight in the north is an obstacle, we can sell them our old used gas guzzlers until hydrogen is ready.

Of course the numbers are rough and we couldn't immediately convert over 100%, but it wouldn't be hard to greatly reduce our consumption. With a bit of government backing and research the numbers would be even more favorable. I do hope we keep everyone addicted to gasoline/diesel/hydrogen a bit longer for selfish reasons though.
Well, I'm a hydrogen doubter for various reasons (transport, storage). So what, buy a hybrid/ electric and the dealership throws in some solar panels for free or reduced cost? I think solar is still too expensive. Plus, you would virtually have to ram that down the throats of homeowner's associations.
I don't know, it's all very complicated.
I really think nuclear is the way to go. It will never happen though.
 
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0-60 in a nuclear hybrid would be phenomenal, but I'd hate to be around a crash.

I'm open to new nuclear designs like PBRs, waste is still a big concern. I'm very pro-wind energy with large turbines. I'm not sure how pollution from "clean" coal electricity would compare with gasoline, suspect it would be better.

There are already a number of state and federal incentives for solar energy, it could be handled in a similar manner. Current economic payback at $3/W in sunny areas is ~10 years, closer to 20 years in most of Louisiana. We still need 10-20 years of research at the current pace for it to be profitable for almost all US locations, increased demand and federal funding would probably expedite the research. When replacing an expensive energy source (gasoline) the payback is much faster.
 

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0-60 in a nuclear hybrid would be phenomenal, but I'd hate to be around a crash.

I'm open to new nuclear designs like PBRs, waste is still a big concern. I'm very pro-wind energy with large turbines. I'm not sure how pollution from "clean" coal electricity would compare with gasoline, suspect it would be better.

There are already a number of state and federal incentives for solar energy, it could be handled in a similar manner. Current economic payback at $3/W in sunny areas is ~10 years, closer to 20 years in most of Louisiana. We still need 10-20 years of research at the current pace for it to be profitable for almost all US locations, increased demand and federal funding would probably expedite the research. When replacing an expensive energy source (gasoline) the payback is much faster.
Ha! I meant nuclear power plants! I suspect you knew that though! Let's see if the Dems are really serious about alternative energy in the next few years.
 

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The government has to step up. An auto company new or existing has to step up. We all will have to change and sacrifice. In other words, it won't happen.
 

staphory

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The government has to step up. An auto company new or existing has to step up. We all will have to change and sacrifice. In other words, it won't happen.
OK I'll bite...
When you say step up, step up how?
 

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