Gone With The Wind Temporally Removed From HBO MAX (Or How To Look Back On Controversial Media) (1 Viewer)

Saint Jack

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Before anyone says it’s oversensitivity, the full movie will return unedited. It’ll just include a discussion about the stereotypes and probably a warning.

WB did something similar when they released the Looney Tunes to DVD unedited.
 

Saintman2884

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i encourage you to go back through the thread - i thought it was a mostly civil/interesting discussion
but
to address your question, consider this"
Jim Crow was the black face character name of a white dude who had learned some old "negro songs"
at first he just tried to sing the songs and the crowds were kinda 'meh' but then he started exaggerating 'black' mannerisms and he (and blackface performers afterwards) noticed that was really no limit to how buffoonish they could make those characters - the audience wanted them as cartoonish as possible
this minstrelry exploded in popularity - the reason they were called "Jim Crow" laws was because the dominant idea that white people had about black people (all over but also specifically in the South) was from seeing them portrayed, parodied, lampooned, mocked, et al on the minstrel stages
"I've seen the way black people really are (on minstrel stages) and it's clear that they are too dumb to police themselves so we'll have to do it for them"

so now consider GWTW - even in 2021, it's still hard as heck to have slavery taught in schools anywhere close to contextually accurate - and you better believe that was the case when GWTW came out and many decades afterwards
GWTW was the best selling book of its time by a wide margin AND then the most popular movie - it's easy to surmise that the dominant narrative about slavery came from GWTW - that slavery 'wasn't that bad'
can you see the lingering social, cultural, political fallout that it has had?
Why in the world would we NOT want that contextualized?
Gone with the Wind was also one of Adolf Hitler's favorite Hollywood movies. He would occasionally watch the film in a especially-constructed private theater in his Berghof mountain home,(sort of the Third Reich's Camp David in south German Alps) and he had a SS bodyguard subordinate translate the movie's English dialogue into his ear after every scene. Hitler wasn't a very fluent English speaker, per say equivalent to lets say Albert Speer or as diplomatic. Nazi propaganda minister Georbels observed the movie portrayed a naive, idealic pastoral, pre-industriailized romantic view of the antebellum South while many individual German filmgoers reportedly made longing references to how the film was a similar characterization of the Nazis VolksGemenieShaat, or Volkstaat, or "People's Ethnic Community", a larger pan-German super-state agrarian Aryan master race where ethnic German communities all over central and Eastern Europe (Nazi propagandists also included UK, or the British Empire, as falling within the boundaries of what they constituted historical or racially shared German ancestry, as well as the Old Norse Viking culture of Scandivinavian countries) that ruled over and populated a larger, " subhuman" Slavic untermensch societies or populations in Poland, Baltic states, modern-day Russia, Ukraine, and so on.

One other complaint about GWTW is how one of the film's main character, and female herione, is depicted as some defiant, strong-willed, resilient woman whereas in reality she's demanding, is belittling, insults or bad mouths family members, friends in their presence and is incredibly naive about the harsh, cruel realities of how the wider world works or how serious or potentially destructive her current surrounding circumstances really get as the novel or the film progresses.
 

Madmarsha

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One other complaint about GWTW is how one of the film's main character, and female herione, is depicted as some defiant, strong-willed, resilient woman whereas in reality she's demanding, is belittling, insults or bad mouths family members, friends in their presence and is incredibly naive about the harsh, cruel realities of how the wider world works or how serious or potentially destructive her current surrounding circumstances really get as the novel or the film progresses.
But Vivien Leigh gave us the best RBF ever.
 

Optimus Prime

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Pepe Le Pew removed from upcoming Space Jam 2
===============================

25 years after starring alongside Michael Jordan in the original Space Jam, the Looney Tunes are preparing to lace up and take the court with LeBron James in the sequel, Space Jam: A New Legacy. But one familiar character will be staying in the locker room: sources at Warner Bros. have said that amorous cartoon skunk, Pepé Le Pew, will not be featured in the upcoming film, which is set to premiere in theaters and on HBO Max on July 16.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the controversial character — who made his first appearance in 1945 — was cut from the movie over a year ago. But the news is coming to light amid an ongoing reckoning with the pop culture of yesteryear, including the recent announcements that Disney+ has put content warnings on select episodes of The Muppet Show, and Dr. Seuss Enterprises ceasing publication of six of the late author's books. Both of those decisions infuriated conservative critics, who held them up as examples of "cancel culture" run amok...............

Pepé Le Pew has been cut from the 'Space Jam' sequel (msn.com)

 

Optimus Prime

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Interesting point was made on CNN about how Fox was covering the Dr. Seuss news

In all of their outrage and indignation in all their coverage about the 6 Seuss books being pulled - they never showed the offending illustrations when talking about it. They didn't show the pictures while saying "what's wrong with this?"
 

bigdaddysaints

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knew we'd be talking Pepe today
we'll see if we have any posters willing to take a pro-rape stance
A lot of people will be mad, but they'll say stuff like "thats just the way it used to be".. So i'm like rape is funny? maybe then, but its not so cool now.....
 

guidomerkinsrules

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A lot of people will be mad, but they'll say stuff like "thats just the way it used to be".. So i'm like rape is funny? maybe then, but its not so cool now.....
the ostensible change is that it used to be just fine (even preferred) to view work through one lens
thankfully now we acknowledge that context and perspective are important for any story
that if you have a joke where you club another to take them back to your house, the club is not the problematic part of the story
 

Sun Wukong

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Even as a kid I always thought Pepe le Pew was a creep. His cartoons were never funny or entertaining, either. Just him being all rapey towards a painted cat for 6 minutes or whatever.
 

Madmarsha

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Even as a kid I always thought Pepe le Pew was a creep. His cartoons were never funny or entertaining, either. Just him being all rapey towards a painted cat for 6 minutes or whatever.
Me, too. Though, while watching a lot of old movies lately, well, sexual assault just came naturally to good old principled Hollywood.
 

DaveXA

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Even as a kid I always thought Pepe le Pew was a creep. His cartoons were never funny or entertaining, either. Just him being all rapey towards a painted cat for 6 minutes or whatever.
Yeah, I watched when I was a kid and what I took from it was I thought it was funny he couldn't tell the difference between a cat and a skunk. I had no concept of rape at the time and just thought he was trying to mate with the wrong animal and even then, went about it in the wrong way.

Looking at it now, makes me wonder what's going on in the head of presumably an adult writing this.
 

Saintman2884

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Yeah, I watched when I was a kid and what I took from it was I thought it was funny he couldn't tell the difference between a cat and a skunk. I had no concept of rape at the time and just thought he was trying to mate with the wrong animal and even then, went about it in the wrong way.

Looking at it now, makes me wonder what's going on in the head of presumably an adult writing this.
I think it was written during a time where WB took accepted or percieved cultural stereotypes from certain countries, like France's supposed Bohemian, avant-garde hammy, perhaps little forceful hopeless romantic types that were wildly exaggerated and turned into ridiculous, cartoon characters.

Pepe Le Pew was written from the mindset of being this slightly devious, pathetic, hopeless romantic who's horny and engages in behavior that due to conversations like these, haven't aged well.

Its the same formula Warner Brothers used to create wildly exaggerated stereotypical characters based on general cultural perceptions like Foghorn Leghorn being a stereotypical archetype for down-home, repetitive rhetoric talking dimwitted Southerners, or Yosemite Sam lampooning wannabe old Western bad arse gun fighters like Billy the Kid or the James Gang but most times, Bugs Bunny or Daffy Duck outsmarted him to show how stupid or idiotic he was.

Speedy Gonzales is actually seen by some Latino advocacy groups and Mexican-Americans as kind of an cultural icon.
 
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Madmarsha

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This could probably go in the meaningless factoids thread. Charles Boyer -- whose mannerisms, accent, and portrayal of Pepe le Moko in "Algiers" are clearly the inspiration for Pepe le Pew -- was married to his wife for 44 years. He committed suicide 2 days after she died from cancer. They had lost their only child, a 22 year old son, to suicide 13 years before their deaths.
 

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