Gone With The Wind Temporally Removed From HBO MAX (Or How To Look Back On Controversial Media) (7 Viewers)

Saint Jack

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Before anyone says it’s oversensitivity, the full movie will return unedited. It’ll just include a discussion about the stereotypes and probably a warning.

WB did something similar when they released the Looney Tunes to DVD unedited.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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Nope sure not. Things do need to change in this country. One thing that needs changing is people getting butt hurt over another's opinion. I didnt say anything negative about the other person's opinion. Just agree to disagree. You dont know me so dont try to act like you do through one post.
Not going to agree to anything as disagreeable as the ‘general lee’
Bad opinions need to be called out
And saying there’s nothing wrong with honoring a traitorous general who fought to keep slavery is a bad opinion
I’m not saying you’re a bad person, I’m saying the opinion you don’t want anyone to comment on is neither informed nor socially responsible
 

guidomerkinsrules

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I get that. I guess what I'm saying is watching those shows in today's context has to be pretty jarring. I mean, I watched both Murphy and Pryor on Netflix a few months ago, and some of the jokes, as funny as they were, made me cringe at the same time.

When watching/listening to them many moons ago, I didn't cringe at all. I guess my perspective has changed in the last 20-30 years.
I’ve told the story before rediscovering David Allen coe’s “If that ain’t country”
The playground where I ‘grew up’ had a coaches’ ‘shack’ and that was one of the 8 tracks that used to play
I liked the song at the time, and snippets of lyrics were always floating around my head

Then many years later, when I’m married and with a kid, I thought of the song and played it on one of the music services
Thank god my wife and kid were upstairs, bc I had completely forgotten about the nword part of the song
Had my wife heard it, I probably would never be able to play country music again

Now it’s not even that the use of the word was even ‘that’ bad in the song (just a short hand for hard working), but there is zero chance I’d ever be able to play it again and zero chance DAC would be able to perform that song
 

49erKiller

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I'm just thinking about where guys like Richard Pryor, Robin Williams and Eddie Murphy fit into all of this. They were all amazingly funny back in the day, but a lot of those jokes, they wouldn't fly today, and they might even get run off the stage. Well, maybe not, but people are weird. They say, not funny, but bust a gut when a comedian says it.
Dave Chappelle, Bill Burr, and Doug Stanhope want to have a word with you... :hihi:
 

DaveXA

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Dave Chappelle, Bill Burr, and Doug Stanhope want to have a word with you... :hihi:
Maybe, but, I've listened to Chappelle. He's really good, but I think Murphy's old stuff is better. His timing, working the crowd, and overall fork it attitude is hard to beat. And it didn't matter. Everyone got roasted, lol.

Modern day comedians have more mines to navigate these days though. It's just different.
 

superchuck500

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Seems like that's an easy fix - I bet most people don't even think to associate Splash Mountain with Song of the South. Just find some other Disney movie where a log flume ride is remotely relevant and re-brand it.
Okay, you're welcome.


 

Optimus Prime

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I'm of an age when my first exposure to the confederate flag was the Dukes of Hazzard. I loved the show as a kid. It wasn't until years later that I learned more about the flag. I'll admit even after learning the history of the flag for a long time when I'd see it my first thought was the General Lee.

That's no longer the case

I still have a soft spot and fond memories of the show, and the last time I saw an episode a few years ago it was still silly fun

The flag is a problem now and if the show wants to be aired they may have to digitally remove it from the car

==================================================================================================
It looks like those good ol’ Duke boys are going to be in need of a new home. Since 2018, all seven seasons of CBS’s quintessentially ’80s series The Dukes of Hazzard have been available to stream on Amazon, first as part of the Prime Video library and currently via IMDb TV, the streaming arm of the much visited website. But a recent report from Vulture suggests that moonshine-running brothers Bo and Luke (played by John Schneider and Tom Wopat) and their cousin Daisy (Catherine Bach) might be facing an eviction notice.

The series is the latest pop culture artifact to face renewed scrutiny in the wake of Black Lives Matter protests inspired by the death of George Floyd, which in turn have inspired Americans to confront the legacy of racial injustice and exclusion in popular entertainment as well as policing. The past few weeks have already seen the cancellation of TV shows like Cops and Live PD and the temporary removal of Gone With the Wind from HBO Max, as well as the discontinuation of famous brands like Aunt Jemima. If The Dukes of Hazzard joins them in exile, it’s because the show wears its offending symbol on its sleeve — or, more accurately, on the roof of Bo and Luke’s signature car: a bright orange 1969 Dodge Charger with a Civil War namesake — Gen. Robert E. Lee — and a Confederate flag emblazoned up top. ………….

Growing up in the early ’80s, journalist Kevin S. Aldridge was one of the Black fans that Jones describes. “When I was a kid, that was my favorite show,” he tells us. “It was this fun, jokey police chase adventure show that didn’t really delve into super-serious topics. I remember that all I wanted for Christmas one year was a Dukes of Hazzard electric racing set where the car would jump over a ravine like it would on the show. I got it, and I played with it all day that Christmas!”

At that age, the General Lee struck him as a “cool car,” like the Batmobile or KITT. “The symbolism behind it was completely lost on me,” remembers the now 45-year-old Aldridge, who is the opinion and engagement editor at the Cincinnati Enquirer. “I don’t recall ever having any deep philosophical conversations about the show with my parents where they tried to tell me about history or anything like that. I think they wanted me to enjoy what I was enjoying.”

In a 2018 Enquirer column, though, Aldridge wrote about a moment from his childhood when his enjoyment of Dukes dimmed. While reenacting scenes from the most recent episode with his white kindergarten classmates, Aldridge tried to sit in the driver’s seat of the wooden car that stood in for the General Lee. His essay describes what happened next:

Right when I was about to sit in the driver’s seat, a few of my white male classmates stopped me. “You can’t drive because you can’t be one of the Duke boys,” one of them said, as he blocked my path. “And why not?” I asked. “Because you’re black,” he said, matter of factly. ... “Don’t feel bad,” said another of my white male classmates in an attempt to soften the blow. “You can pretend to be Cooter.”
“That was the first time I felt like I was confronting a barrier to something I wanted to do,” Aldridge says now. “I wanted to be the Duke boys, but I found out that day I couldn’t be one of the Duke boys, because they were white and I wasn’t. I continued to watch the show and love the show even after that experience, but it was a bitter moment — I remember that.” ………………...

 

Optimus Prime

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In a week of shows announcing that white actors would no longer voice Black characters, The Simpsons has made its own casting change.

“Moving forward, The Simpsons will no longer have white actors voice non-white characters,” the producers for Fox’s long-running, animated tent pole said in a statement.

The move is the latest in an awakening for the TV industry, taking place in the aftermath of nationwide protests in which people are demanding racial justice and equality. This week alone, Kristen Bell from Central Park and Jenny Slate from Big Mouth said, within hours of each other, that they would no longer voice Black characters.

Slate said she regretted her part in “the erasure of Black people.” The makers of live-action shows, such as 30 Rock, Scrubs, Community and Parks and Recreation, yanked episodes of those series that included blackface. Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel apologized for having worn blackface himself in the now defunct The Man Show...……….

 

DaveXA

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In a week of shows announcing that white actors would no longer voice Black characters, The Simpsons has made its own casting change.

“Moving forward, The Simpsons will no longer have white actors voice non-white characters,” the producers for Fox’s long-running, animated tent pole said in a statement.

The move is the latest in an awakening for the TV industry, taking place in the aftermath of nationwide protests in which people are demanding racial justice and equality. This week alone, Kristen Bell from Central Park and Jenny Slate from Big Mouth said, within hours of each other, that they would no longer voice Black characters.

Slate said she regretted her part in “the erasure of Black people.” The makers of live-action shows, such as 30 Rock, Scrubs, Community and Parks and Recreation, yanked episodes of those series that included blackface. Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel apologized for having worn blackface himself in the now defunct The Man Show...……….

Never thought about white actors voicing black characters in animated shows and/or movies, or vice versa. That sounds like an interesting topic.
 

Optimus Prime

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Never thought about white actors voicing black characters in animated shows and/or movies, or vice versa. That sounds like an interesting topic.
That goes back to the Amos & Andy radio show
 

Complex Kid

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DaveXA

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This was a pretty good article on the subject.


While reading the article it mentions this cartoon which I had never stumbled on before:


And just wooooooooow.

I have no issues with no longer showing racist films and images and even some of the cancel culture where appropriate. But I do wonder whether sanitizing already completed movies, shows and artwork from society maybe removes what actually happened or was told? People should be able to see what things were like back when racism and discrimination was ignored or even accepted.

For example, I watched 13th on Netflix, and there were images of lynchings and brutality that hurt to watch. If those were edited out, I wouldn't understand how badly people were being treated simply because of the color of their skin. I'm just thinking, should we gloss over or ignore the mistakes and wrongheadedness of the decisions people made. I dunno, just pondering here.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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I have no issues with no longer showing racist films and images and even some of the cancel culture where appropriate. But I do wonder whether sanitizing already completed movies, shows and artwork from society maybe removes what actually happened or was told? People should be able to see what things were like back when racism and discrimination was ignored or even accepted.

For example, I watched 13th on Netflix, and there were images of lynchings and brutality that hurt to watch. If those were edited out, I wouldn't understand how badly people were being treated simply because of the color of their skin. I'm just thinking, should we gloss over or ignore the mistakes and wrongheadedness of the decisions people made. I dunno, just pondering here.
I think you’re putting the cart before the horse
The movies/art that you are talking about ARE the sanitized or propaganda) versions - presumably, they hinder our moving forward bc they make disgusting actions/behaviors palatable

Hamilton deliberately takes great liscense with the past - it’s done in these post- modern times, so it has artistic precedent
But say it’s 100 years from now and we are several cycles away from post-modernism — maybe the culture is so diffuse and varied that arts years for historical accuracy- I could see Hamilton coming under fire for its retelling of history
 

Mr. Sparkle

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I have no issues with no longer showing racist films and images and even some of the cancel culture where appropriate. But I do wonder whether sanitizing already completed movies, shows and artwork from society maybe removes what actually happened or was told? People should be able to see what things were like back when racism and discrimination was ignored or even accepted.

For example, I watched 13th on Netflix, and there were images of lynchings and brutality that hurt to watch. If those were edited out, I wouldn't understand how badly people were being treated simply because of the color of their skin. I'm just thinking, should we gloss over or ignore the mistakes and wrongheadedness of the decisions people made. I dunno, just pondering here.
That's why I havent tossed any of my DVDs. Physical media is the only way to protect against one of your favorite shows or movies getting memory-holed in an online world.
 

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