Growing Creole Tomatoes (1 Viewer)

alon504

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This year I am planning on growing creole tomatoes (my first attempt). I've always bought them at store or on the street, but, I'm going to grow some this year. I will be planting two or three vines in big pots. I have a few questions. What is the best way to get the most out of my plant? How do I prevent rotting and bugs? What is the best soil? Sunlight--how much? I really want them to grow healthy...I know that growing tomatoes can be disastrous if not done properly. Please give me any advice you have to offer or some of your own success stories. Thanks....it won't be too long and it will be time to plant.
 

buzd

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sun, sun, sun.

Keep reasonably moist.

I know there are some sprays for bugs, but I've had good luck there.
 

buzd

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If you're in NOLA area, be prepared for your plants to start scorching come July. You may be able to get around that by shading or misting in the hottest part of the day, but once you get that consistent 90-95 heat for hours, the plants don't take it well.

You might start planting now and then go back for more plants every week or two so your harvests are staggered too. Otherwise, you may end up with too many tomatoes all at once (although I will happily take some).
 

mr.t

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I would not plant until after Easter. I made a compost heap out of leaves, grass, and some food and grease. I put down about five plants a year. Keep them watered and in sun. I only use tap water in drought. Watch the bugs and try to make an organic killer. I will plant in mid March. I picked last year until the drought hit in July-Aug, I believe. After that, the bugs and heat killed them. Good luck. I enjoy my garden-about 250 square feet.
 

Joe OKC

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What exactually is a Creole tomato? Like an Arkansas Traveler? or better boy.

http://www.summersetreview.org/02fall/tomato.htm

Ironically my grandpa grew acres of tomatos, and I can;t grow a decent one... Since we're not farming anymore and i dont wanna dig up the yard... it's container plants... Herbs are great...

buzd is right, that scorching sun can be deadly... so don;t plant on the reflective side of the house...

Joe
 

hardhead233

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What exactually is a Creole tomato? Like an Arkansas Traveler? or better boy.

http://www.summersetreview.org/02fall/tomato.htm

Ironically my grandpa grew acres of tomatos, and I can;t grow a decent one... Since we're not farming anymore and i dont wanna dig up the yard... it's container plants... Herbs are great...

buzd is right, that scorching sun can be deadly... so don;t plant on the reflective side of the house...

Joe

the best damn tomatoes ever boy, ooh wee, cut them up raw, and put them in a bowl with some oil and vinegar, a touch of salt and a good bit of black pepper...mmmmmm bon appetite cher....:9:
 
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alon504

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They are the best tomatoes ever. Thanks for the tips...I'll incorporate all in different ways. One question, concerning bugs...what is an "organic killer?" But, I'm probably planting them in two weeks. Thanks.
 

Rob Beaux

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Creoles are over rated. Locals think its the only thing around. Taste normal not a bit different or complex favor. And yes I have grown my own purchased others from local fruit stands and its just not there.

Best Tomatoes ever..... Cherokee purple . Complex favor, a bit acid and sweet at the same time a bit "smokey" also. Step out of what you always grew and try some other.
 
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Joe OKC

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They usually don;t sell Creole Tomatos here... Most AR travelers, btter boys, beefsteaks, jet2000, earlygirl and patios...

IF anyone one has some C tomato seeds, I'll be proud to start some...

Joe
 

mr.t

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Organic Killer: a mixture of things: chewing tobbaco, hot sauce, dish washing det. and lemon juice. It works for me most of the time. Will it work for you, I do not know. It will not work on mustard greens or cauliflower, but it has worked on tomatoes and various beans.
Good luck, mr.t.
 

Joe OKC

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Well... 50 miles later... I have some Creole tomatoes.. Gonna give thema whirl.. So far, they handed saddlebags well... One upside down and the other just a normal old plant...

Joe
 

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If you wanted a quality crop, you should have begun your tomato plants in your hothouse sometime in January or early February. This year would have been a little trickier because of the late cold snaps and occasional frost (which can severely damage your plants). You need 2-3 months of growing time before they will produce, and this being mid-April, you are already against the wall (EDIT: Just saw this is from February 29th). Your plants will probably produce, but you're not going to get the crop you might have had you planted earlier. Additionally, they don't do as well in pots as they do in the ground for whatever reason. The best grower I knew was Mr. Harold over in the Rigolets (Zone 9 for you New Orleanians who know what I'm talking about). What he did was cut out the bottoms of 55 gallon drums, bury them in the ground, and plant 2-3 plants inside each one. For whatever reason, the bushes (Creoles aren't vines FWIW) produced at a ratio of about 3:1 to those which were not contained within the drums. He proved this out year after year.

Don't expect to get too many giant tomatoes like you see in the store. Yours are likely to be quite a bit smaller unless you overdo it with fertilizer which will tend to downplay the taste of your tomatoes. You want sandy well drained soil with a lot of peat moss incorporated into it.

As for pests, just expect them. Typically in New Orleans, you will see a few worms, some birds may peck at them, and when your plants are small, expect some caterpillars and aphids. If you check them every day, you can rid yourself of most of these pests without having to incorporate pesticides into your own, personal food chain. Aphids are often displaced via a homemade pepper spray which they find to be an irritant. Some people also plant marigolds among their tomato and pepper plants (peppers = easier to grow) as most garden insects find marigolds offensive and bitter and will seek out other areas to chew on.

How do I know this? Vegetables 101 @ SLU circa 1984 and home trial and error. If you have any fences or climbing areas, cucumbers do pretty well down here. The easiest things we grew were peppers and cucumbers, but pole and bush beans do well in season, tomatoes are good if you have the time to water them, some herbs do well (rosemary in particular), figs are easy to grow, eggplants are +/- tomatoes, you can do corn, and certainly loquats/japanese plums are everywhere right now. It's more difficult to grow cold weather crops such as lettuces (cabbage and kale work), and you want to stay away from things that either sit on the ground or grow in the ground as from year to year you run into problems with rot (pumpkins, gourds) or thrips which are in-ground bugs that will bore into your crops (onions, carrots, potatoes etc.). Scallions/green onions (aka shallots in these parts) are very easy to grow and usually a staple in most home vegetable gardens down here.

TPS
 

Joe OKC

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This has turned out be the best plant...

Joe
 

Joe OKC

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Update.. of all the tomato plantsw that I have.. AR traveler, celbrities, better boys etc... this friggin creole is by far the best one... Already producing good size tomtoes while the others are still just srouting blooms.

Joe
 

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