How soon before gas prices start to rise? (1 Viewer)

Shawn

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Put your money down now. The elections are over, and there's some travelling expected to be done around the country soon. I expect gas prices to start rising as early as next week.

And the the most interesting thing of all will be hearing the reasons for the increase.

Of course, it's just market forces. Nothing to do with politics.
 
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Shawn

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I've been joking about this for a couple of months now. Most transparent sham ever.

Maybe has more with the oil companies trying to make a donation to the GOP than any kind of top-down manipulation. Low gas prices make for better economic numbers.

I expect prices to go through the roof by Christmas time.
 

BullDawg

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Yeah, it took a moment to kick in mentally. One day (Tues) it was $1.99 (and had been for several weeks) and then shot up to $2.09 by this afternoon. I'm scratching my head knowing the recent reports of continued drops in oil prices even with OPEC threatening to cull back production. Then the light flickered on and I realized what had happen...the elections were over.
 

HouDat

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Yeah, it took a moment to kick in mentally. One day (Tues) it was $1.99 (and had been for several weeks) and then shot up to $2.09 by this afternoon. I'm scratching my head knowing the recent reports of continued drops in oil prices even with OPEC threatening to cull back production. Then the light flickered on and I realized what had happen...the elections were over.
Ehh...prices stopped their fall here about 2 weeks ago; slightly bumped up over last weekend. They haven't moved since then. :dunno:
 

UncleTrvlingJim

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Here in Virginia they bumped up a bit a couple weeks ago, and have stayed steady since.
 
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Gas prices in MS are hovering around 2 a gallon.

Please explain to me how politics played a part in low gas prices.
Gas prices are determined by the marketplace not a politician.

Wait, maybe I'm on Democratic Underground by mistake. No, now I see, I'm on Daily Kos.
 

BullDawg

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Nah...the prices are supposed to be controlled by speculation trading. You can't help but acknowledge the near total synchronization between the end of the election and the price creep.

btw...I'm firmly in Republican territory. I don't really believe the R party fixed the prices.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

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Please explain to me how politics played a part in low gas prices.
Gas prices are determined by the marketplace not a politician.
...This guy, Dubya, has such deep inroads to the oil industry in Texas- and influence in the policy of our country in regards to oil- that it's ridiculous. True, he was born and educated in friggin' CONNECTICUT, despite the Cowboy image he tries so desperately to portray, but he does have a lot of buddies in the "Awl Bidness" that he looks out for, and to think othrwise is naive.......
 

Wombat

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Yeah, traders from around the world with varying political and financial interests are all in Bush's pocket.
 

Det. Brees

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didnt you get the note. if your from or live in texas you own lots of oil rigs in this country therefore you charge high prices for the oil we buy from the middle east. mmmmmmmmm
 

TPS

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Robinette destroyed one of those "Democrats can't complain, look who they voted for" argument the other day when some radical called in to be partisan. He said why does every time the prices go up at the pump, OPEC cuts them. Because just like the corporate interests, OPEC doesn't have a vested interest in losing America as a favored consumer. It's everyone's fault. If prices get too high, then alternatives become feasible.

What needs to happen is that we need to get off the grid. $500 billion and potentially up to $2 trillion could have solved anybody's (including ours) oil problems. Iraq was a temporary solution and will result in the continued free flow of oil (for now) out of that region. But we need to get off the stuff. The entire economy could be driven by a changeover into whatever we decide on for the next fueling mechanism. Our true national security depends on our own oil independence. That's the easiest fact to throw out there these days no matter what your political persuasion may be. Everyone knows it. So why was Jerry Brown (Gov. Moonbeam) the only recent candidate to make it a major priority of his presidential campaign? Aren't we America? Can't we invent something else without the ties to the existing power structure (corporate, domestic and international)?

TPS
 

TPS

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>>Yeah, traders from around the world with varying political and financial interests are all in Bush's pocket.

What you can't reconcile is why they met with energy insiders (Ken Lay et al) to craft this administration's policy and still refuse to make that information public. Something's there (think you agreed with me about that type of governance in a thread earlier this week).

TPS
 

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What needs to happen is that we need to get off the grid. $500 billion and potentially up to $2 trillion could have solved anybody's (including ours) oil problems. TPS

Exactly Steve. And that calculator is still counting up quickly. I seldom agree or align with any parties politics but this line by Bush is spot on...that "America is addicted to oil" and that we need alternatives. But then you must ask what is he doing to generate funding, support etc or it is just more talk.

As far as Iraq goes - we should just withdraw immediatley. We can't afford the no strategy effort and regardless, whoever emerges as leaders will have to sell the oil to us anyway - they can't drink the stuff.
 

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