Hurricane Preparedness Tips (1 Viewer)

cajuncook

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I will begin with the ice tip since it takes time to make the ice.

Use containers such as gallon milk jugs,etc... fill with water to about 4 inches from top and freeze.. while freezing, keep lid off, but replace when ice is frozen.
Lable as "drinkable" any bottles that were properly washed and safe for drinking... (ex: you would prob not use a washed cooking oil bottle for drinkable water, but you would a washed milk bottle.)
Freeze as many containers as possible in the spaces you have in your freezer...... they can be used in your refrigerator in the vegetable bins and turn your refrigerator into a massive "ice chest"....
you put the ice into the fridge as the last thing you do before evacing or when power is about to go out if riding out the storm. Spread tighly closed bottles of water around on various shelves in boht freezer and refridgerator. Lids help prevent water spillage as the ice melts .
Large tupperware square or rectange containers work great..... to make blocks up to 3-4 inches thick, and then popped out and bagged in a large ziplock or wrapped in serveral grocerery plastic bags, taped tightly shut in order to reuse the hugh "ice tray"/

I do the freezing of ice each year as spring comes to an end.... while eating out of the freezer to minimize quantity of food therein as it is used. Then when a storm is headed in just a few more need be prepared.

I have a side by side freezer/fridge and an upright freezer... as I use food from the sidebyside, freezer section, I replace the space wiht ice.... and free up more space to make ice in the big freezer...... Sometimes jugs are not removed for a few years if the space is not needed. c
 

gboudx

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Add ice or fill water/milk jugs with ice and stick it in the freezer. This will keep it colder longer. If you have a propane grill, make sure the tank is full or you have a full backup tank. We have a sideburner on our's so if need be, we can heat up something.

- A battery-powered weather radio and/or an emergency radio that can run on solar power or a crank.

Harbor Freight was selling these flashlights that didn't need batteries. It has a small crank that you just cranked up to generate the power you needed for the flashlight. I bought 2 of those for $2 each. I should've bought more.
 

primadox

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Add ice or fill water/milk jugs with ice and stick it in the freezer. This will keep it colder longer.
This really works...I made a ton of ice this way prior to Ike...milk jugs mostly, but everytime I'd empty a 2-liter bottle of soda or a bottle of juice, I'd fill it up and freeze it. I'd also fill big zip locks of ice cubes and keep those as well. The night before Ike I combined everything frozen into my big standup freezer, and packed the ice jugs and bags of ice among the frozen foods, especially the meats. And I turned everything to the coldest settings...I was amazed at how many people here didn't know to do that! I kept a couple of jugs and several bags of the ice cubes in my freezer inside, ready to stick in the fridge next to the milk and cold cuts. Our power was out for only 12 hours, a miracle now that I see homes around me still without electricity, and we lost NOTHING. We could have gone at least another day, we had so much ice. I had a cooler ready to move everything into if I needed to put the refrigerated stuff into a smaller space once the cold air in the fridge was gone, and duct tape for the seal around the freezer...never even had to do that, thankfully. I ended up giving all my ice away, bits at a time, to a friend of a neighbor who had a parent on insulin.

And even if you're in a "safe" area like we were, get a weeks worth of food for each person. Our groceries, even up here in the NW part of Houston, are just now getting fully restocked, almost a week after Ike. Thankfully I had a ton of those snack crackers with cheese, poptarts, cereal, sandwich stuff, peanut butter, etc., for me and the kids. There are several restaurants around here that are still without power and not open, and those that are were on limited menus for awhile (some still are). And yes, fill that gas tank as soon as a named storm occurs, and keep it topped off. That paid off for me big time.

What didn't I have? D batteries...I honestly couldn't find them for a couple of weeks before Ike; I was trying to find them before Gustav and couldn't. I'm buying them as soon as they get some in. My Coleman camping lamp has been invaluable to me for years; it was a security blanket for my kids. I realized I didn't have an extra bulb for it, and I need to find one. I have looked with no luck, but I need to look harder. It was in the back of my mind that the bulb just might go out...I also need a better flashlight. I thought we had a big one, and couldn't find it, and was stuck with a little cheapo and one small crank flashlight.

Lessons learned...and I learned a lot of good lessons on this thread! Many people asked "how did you know to do that?"

And I'm still keeping a few jugs of ice in my freezer, as Hurricane repellent, LOL.
 

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Or in the garage. The fumes will get in the house and kill you. Generators stay outside. That means you may be without power for a while as the storm passes, but don't fire it up in the garage.
You can put it in the garage to keep it dry, as long as you put it next to the garage door, leave the garage door open at least above the generator, and point the exhaust directly outside. But you definitely CAN'T put it in an enclosed garage. Bad news if you do that.
 

SharonT

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Bumping this now because of Louisiana's tax-free weekend on hurricane supplies!

The sales tax exemption applies to the first $1,500 of each item sold.
Here's the list:

Eligible items include:
* Self-powered light sources such as flashlights and candles;
* Portable self-powered radios, two-way radios and weather band radios;
* Tarpaulins or other flexible waterproof sheeting;
* Ground anchor system or tie-down kits;
* Gas or diesel fuel tanks;
* Batteries of various sizes including AAA-cell, D-cell and 9-volt;
* Cellular phone batteries and chargers.
* Nonelectric food storage coolers;
* Storm shutter devices. Those are defined as materials and products manufactured, rated and marketed specifically for preventing wind-blown damage from storms.
* Carbon monoxide detectors, important in case of natural gas service interruption, and "blue ice" and similar reusable cooling products.
And More info
 

primadox

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With Irene threatening the east coast, another freezer tip....

Put your meats/etc. into garbage bags in the freezer. If you evacuate, add a baggie of ice cubes to your freezer...if and how much they melt will give you a hint on how long your power was out, and how much your food may have thawed, even if your power is on when you get home. Completely thawed and refrozen...pitch the food. Good thing is, all that meat is in garbage bags, so there's no worry of drippage into the coils of your freezer. I also do this even if I'm staying; if the power is out for awhile I certainly don't want to lose cold air by opening the freezer to check to see if the meats are starting to drip. They're in the bag, ready to pitch, cook, or put away as usual.

The ice cube trick really works...in fact, I do that every time I travel...there's nothing like coming home to clocks blinking, and wondering how long the power was out. The condition of the ice cubes gives me a good indication of whether we had an extended outage or just a power blink.
 

SharonT

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For those who are new to the forum, Miss Billie (cajuncook) was one of our original members and a diehard Saints fan who passed in 2007. She really could cook, and put together a mean fantasy team as well, beating out many of the young guys in the early days. :hihi:
 

krushing

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My tip for those who plan to stay is to put your generator under full load for at least an hour on a hot day. Just cranking it with no load isn't a good test. Mine overheated and shutdown last year due to "air intake gaskets" rotting that direct airflow across the inside the unit. Needed full load conditions on a hot day to know there was a problem. I posted in another thread but I think it's worth repeating. It was an easy fix but would have had me down for the real thing.
 

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Also, check your poles.

Isaac showed just how bad entergy's power pole infrastructure is. Some of them snapped like twigs. I realized the pole behind my house is looking like it's rotting through, and I got a 24 hour response from them after I contacted both Entergry and my councilwoman.

Of course it turns out that it's ATT's pole, and while I have an open ticket, they haven't done anything yet. :mad:
 

travelingsaintsfan

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We are twice as prepared this year as last year. I now have a motorhome that has a 5500 Onan generator plus the one we bought last year. I did my startup and running a few weeks ago on the one I bought last year. So I can either leave or live in the motorhome if necessary. If necessary I can fill up the 80 gallon tank on the motorhome and run the generator for a long time.

My wife is going to Milwaukee to visit family she has not seen since 2006 on August 1 and she is debating going. I told her to go and enjoy herself and I would hold the fort down with a hurricane party.
 

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Microchip your pets. Part of the check-up at the vet is scanning the microchip to make sure it's okay.
 

krushing

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For those who live outside the city, think about getting a buried propane tank. Nothing like having 500 gallons of propane in the ground for water heater and generator when you are without power for 10 days. An efficient instant on water propane water heater will help pay for it over many years.
 

SharonT

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Another excellent article by Dan Gill:

Trees and Hurricanes: How to assess, prune and prepare now for big storms

If you have a vegetable garden, harvest all vegetables before the storm to get them out of harm's way. There likely will be little left after the storm, and don't eat anything that was covered by flood water.
If the hurricane is a few days out, and you have the time, mow your lawn. If the storm hits, it may be some time before you have the opportunity to do it again.
Plus, when everything dries out, a cut lawn will make it easier to rake or use the leaf blower to clear debris.
 

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Yatman

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Apologies if this is buried in the thread, but it's beneficial for those seeking info in affected areas...

Change voicemail greetings on home/cell phones to describe your safety condition or evac plans.

When phone service deteriorates, fam/friends seeking info about you (who get through to your number) will at least know your latest sitrep, even if you can't explain it live.
 
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