Independent candidate Evan McMullin is within striking distance in Utah... (1 Viewer)

crosswatt

Gone Fishing.
Staff member
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 10, 2001
Messages
32,282
Reaction score
46,065
Location
Chesapeake, VA
Offline
Poll Finds Clinton, Trump Tied in Utah; Independent McMullin Within Striking Distance

<div align="center"><a href="http://www.270towin.com/maps/Qxm4b"><img src="http://www.270towin.com/presidential_map_new/maps/Qxm4b.png" width="800"></a><br><small><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://www.270towin.com/uploads/3rd_party_270_30px.png" alt="" /> Click the map to create your own at <a href="http://www.270towin.com/maps/Qxm4b">270toWin.com</a></small></div>

It's still the ultimate of political Hail Mary attempts, but I like the fact that at least one state is as tired of seeing these two idiots up there as I am.

If by some miracle Trump can pull in Florida, North Carolina, Iowa and Ohio, and McMullin can tap into the Mormon populations of Arizona, Idaho, and Hawaii and edge into the lead in those states, this thing getting thrown into the House of Representatives could actually happen.

(I know, but its my pipe dream, and I'll cling to it until this is all over.)
 

mt15

Subscribing Member
Staff member
Super Moderator
VIP Subscribing Member
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 14, 2006
Messages
13,342
Reaction score
18,184
Offline
Why would you want the election to go to the House?
 
OP

crosswatt

Gone Fishing.
Staff member
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 10, 2001
Messages
32,282
Reaction score
46,065
Location
Chesapeake, VA
Offline
Why would you want the election to go to the House?
Mainly because I can't fathom the thought of either Clinton or Trump actually being the President. So I'm keeping whatever unlikely chance there is that it still could possibly not get to that alive.

The theory is that the House obviously won't pick Hillary, as the GOP makes up the majority. And the majority of the GOP representatives don't want to deal with Trump at this point either. So they would explore an alternate option, and what better option would their be than their very own former House GOP Policy Director?

Now, the interesting thing about it going to the house is that the senate then gets to pick the Vice President. So we could end up with a split ticket, which would be a fascinating turn of events...
 

mt15

Subscribing Member
Staff member
Super Moderator
VIP Subscribing Member
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 14, 2006
Messages
13,342
Reaction score
18,184
Offline
I seriously doubt that the House would turn to anyone but Trump. Only a handful of Republicans have refused to endorse him. The whips would be cracked and they would vote for the Republican nominee. I have zero faith they would vote their consciences, zero. I will fervently hope your scenario comes nowhere close to happening.
 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
31,743
Reaction score
19,504
Age
49
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
I seriously doubt that the House would turn to anyone but Trump. Only a handful of Republicans have refused to endorse him. The whips would be cracked and they would vote for the Republican nominee. I have zero faith they would vote their consciences, zero. I will fervently hope your scenario comes nowhere close to happening.
There are very few actual fervent supporters of Trump in the House. If given the opportunity, I really think they'd pick someone else entirely. They would be under no obligation to choose Trump in this scenario.

Regardless, it's not happening. Trump is bleeding too much support right now, and he's mortally wounded imo. I don't see him preventing the coming landslide.
 

Sardonios

Homer-for-life
Joined
Sep 7, 2003
Messages
1,553
Reaction score
665
Location
Mid-City
Offline
There are very few actual fervent supporters of Trump in the House. If given the opportunity, I really think they'd pick someone else entirely. They would be under no obligation to choose Trump in this scenario.

Regardless, it's not happening. Trump is bleeding too much support right now, and he's mortally wounded imo. I don't see him preventing the coming landslide.
That's not really accurate. The House wouldn't just get to pick anyone they choose. They have to pick from the top 3 in electoral voting. So Trump, Hillary, and in this scenario McMullin. There would be a lot of pressure to pick Trump when the only alternatives are Hillary and someone who ran as an Independent spoiler.
 

bclemms

More than 15K posts served!
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Messages
32,974
Reaction score
42,235
Age
12
Location
Jackson, ms
Online
I have no clue who he is but I'd vote for him simply because he only has $44k in his campaign fund.
 
OP

crosswatt

Gone Fishing.
Staff member
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 10, 2001
Messages
32,282
Reaction score
46,065
Location
Chesapeake, VA
Offline
I seriously doubt that the House would turn to anyone but Trump. Only a handful of Republicans have refused to endorse him. The whips would be cracked and they would vote for the Republican nominee. I have zero faith they would vote their consciences, zero. I will fervently hope your scenario comes nowhere close to happening.
I would bet any amount of money that I could get my hands on that the house GOP would not support Trump in this scenario.

The ONLY reason anyone on this planet not blood related to him is even partially supporting him is to stop Hillary from getting elected. Given a plan B that accomplishes that task, I believe that 100% of movement conservatives would opt for the alternate path.
 

Saint_Ward

Don't be a Jerk.
Staff member
Administrator
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 1, 2007
Messages
46,355
Reaction score
39,942
Location
Fort Lauderdale, FL
Offline
So, would the current house pick or the newly elected house? I guess it technically has to be the current house, since there are procedures to make things happen before Inauguration day.
 

insidejob

Respect existence or expect resistance.
Approved Blogger
Joined
Feb 3, 2010
Messages
32,130
Reaction score
53,403
Location
Back in 70124
Offline
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelfth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

It would be the incoming Congress, and they almost surely would not vote until January. Typically the actual formality of a counting of the electors doesn't happen until then for a normal election, and I think constitutionally they can't take office until January.
Help me out and show me where it says that it's the incoming Congress that would be doing the selection. I couldn't find where it says that in the linked wiki.

It's still early and I'm on my first cup of coffee at the office. Damn Keurig seems to have died at home so I'm still catching up to 6 AM brain activity.
 

Galbreath34

Very Banned
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
May 8, 2008
Messages
32,273
Reaction score
30,805
Offline
I think the main reason is that it goes with the usual process for counting the electoral votes which is always done as a formality in January by the incoming Congress, not the outgoing one. It would be odd not to call out that there's some special shift in who counts only when the vote isn't a majority if that were the intent. Interestingly seems that became standardized only in 1936 with the 20th.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electoral_College_(United_States)

The Twelfth Amendment mandates that the Congress assemble in joint session to count the electoral votes and declare the winners of the election.<sup id="cite_ref-43" class="reference">[43]</sup> The session is ordinarily required to take place on January 6 in the calendar year immediately following the meetings of the presidential electors.<sup id="cite_ref-3USC15_44-0" class="reference">[44]</sup> Since the Twentieth Amendment, the newly elected House declares the winner of the election; all elections before 1936 were determined by the outgoing House instead.
The meeting is held at 1:00 pm in the Chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives.<sup id="cite_ref-3USC15_44-1" class="reference">[44]</sup> The sitting vice president is expected to preside, but in several cases the President pro tempore of the Senate has chaired the proceedings instead. The vice president and the Speaker of the House sit at the podium, with the vice president in the seat of the Speaker of the House. Senate pages bring in the two mahogany boxes containing each state's certified vote and place them on tables in front of the senators and representatives. Each house appoints two tellers to count the vote (normally one member of each political party). Relevant portions of the Certificate of Vote are read for each state, in alphabetical order.
Members of Congress can object to any state's vote count, provided that the objection is presented in writing and is signed by at least one member of each house of Congress. An objection supported by at least one senator and one representative will be followed by the suspension of the joint session and by separate debates and votes in each House of Congress; after both Houses deliberate on the objection, the joint session is resumed. A State's certificate of vote can be rejected only if both Houses of Congress vote to accept the objection. In that case, the votes from the State in question are simply ignored. The votes of Arkansas and Louisiana were rejected in the presidential election of 1872.<sup id="cite_ref-45" class="reference">[45]</sup>
 

Saint_Ward

Don't be a Jerk.
Staff member
Administrator
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 1, 2007
Messages
46,355
Reaction score
39,942
Location
Fort Lauderdale, FL
Offline
Help me out and show me where it says that it's the incoming Congress that would be doing the selection. I couldn't find where it says that in the linked wiki.

It's still early and I'm on my first cup of coffee at the office. Damn Keurig seems to have died at home so I'm still catching up to 6 AM brain activity.
I think either can be argued. Congress takes office on Jan 3rd now, and the President/VP on Jan 20th. So, the new congress would have 17 days. However, the old congress would have about two months.

I'm sure if the Democrats take the house (not that likely) they'd push to stall, like the GOP is doing with the SCOTUS nomination to make it be the "next house", and the GOP will try to hurry. If the GOP wins the house.. they'd probably just do whatever they feel like.
 

JimEverett

More than 15K posts served!
Joined
Mar 18, 2001
Messages
24,979
Reaction score
7,834
Offline
I think either can be argued. Congress takes office on Jan 3rd now, and the President/VP on Jan 20th. So, the new congress would have 17 days. However, the old congress would have about two months.

I'm sure if the Democrats take the house (not that likely) they'd push to stall, like the GOP is doing with the SCOTUS nomination to make it be the "next house", and the GOP will try to hurry. If the GOP wins the house.. they'd probably just do whatever they feel like.
Current Congress wold not have two months. They would, at most, have 2 weeks. But more likely even less than that. Depending on when all states submit their electors choices for President to the Senate.

Although the current Congress can change the timeline, presumably at any time.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
ndcc N/S Edwards-Helaire beasting tonight (...maybe early OROY candidate) Saints Super Forum (Main Board) 33


Headlines

Top Bottom