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CCL36

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This Karma thing is a misnomer

Karma is what you reap in this life -i.e. the good and bad that happens to you as the result of a past life you consciously do not remember.

Sowing and Reaping is the more appropriate phrase to describe getting your "just' rewards for actions that comprise one's lifestyle.
 
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JimEverett

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This Karma thing is a misnomer

Karma is what you reap in this life -i.e. the good and bad that happens to you as the result of a past life you consciously do not remember.

Sowing and Reaping is the more appropriate phrase to describe gettingyour "just' rewards for actions that comprise one's lifestyle.

I don't think that is true. Karma simply means "Action" and encompasses all acts - both past and present. So yeah, getting punched in the face after saying something to someone that is offensive is the result of karma - of the person's action.
 

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I don't think that is true. Karma simply means "Action" and encompasses all acts - both past and present. So yeah, getting punched in the face after saying something to someone that is offensive is the result of karma - of the person's action.

Karma is always bad. There is no such thing as "good Karma." Karma is the result of bad acts and it blocks us from seeing our true selves/the true world, thus achieving enlightenment.

For the Buddhists, you meditate to get rid of Karma. You can achieve enlightenment, which is mostly the realization that there is nothing, through this meditation. IRRC, for a Buddhist good acts do not get rid of Karma, but they do not create more Karma that has to be gotten through.

Hindu's meditate and perform good acts to get rid of Karma. IIRC, the Hindus concentrate more on performing good acts to get rid of Karma than meditation. They also add in the concept of reincarnation. You continue to reincarnate as higher and higher lifeforms, a cow being the highest, until you have gotten rid of all of your Karma a achieve enlightenment.

Karma really has nothing to do with what happens to you in your day to day life. karma doesn't "get you." It's simply an impediment that must be cleared to get to enlightenment. I think the confusion in Western Society regarding the true meaning of Karma probably started with the Beatles. Since then, the western meaning of the term is mostly what you say above, but it is not what it means in the religions that the term is borrowed from.
 

JimEverett

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"Karma" is a Sanskrit word and originally meant simply "Action." It has still retained this basic meaning. But by the late Brahmanas and certainly by the time of the Upanishads the word began to encompass much more - almost encapsulating a theory of cause-and-effect.
This theory of karma simply meant that if you behaved badly you would become bad, if you behaved in a good manner you would become good. All your actions you take are the reusult of what you did and all of your future actions are the result of what you did or are doing. This is what Krishna is telling Arjuna in the Mahabharata - what Arjuna is about to do (kill) has already been determined by the past actions.
The idea of karma was eventually combined with the idea of reincarnation - leading to the idea that good acts in this life lead to a higher level of life in the next life - and vice-versa.
In one sense karma is always bad - in the sense that karma always results in a next life (although the next life can be good or bad - or better or worse, based on whether you engaged in good acts or bad acts). This is where Hinduism comes up with "moksha" - or release from karma. I won;t bore you with what that all means.
The Buddhists seek a similar, albeit different, state - they call it nirvana.
The Jains call such liberation moksha as well, although it too has some differences.
 

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"Karma" is a Sanskrit word and originally meant simply "Action." It has still retained this basic meaning. But by the late Brahmanas and certainly by the time of the Upanishads the word began to encompass much more - almost encapsulating a theory of cause-and-effect.
This theory of karma simply meant that if you behaved badly you would become bad, if you behaved in a good manner you would become good. All your actions you take are the reusult of what you did and all of your future actions are the result of what you did or are doing. This is what Krishna is telling Arjuna in the Mahabharata - what Arjuna is about to do (kill) has already been determined by the past actions.
The idea of karma was eventually combined with the idea of reincarnation - leading to the idea that good acts in this life lead to a higher level of life in the next life - and vice-versa.
In one sense karma is always bad - in the sense that karma always results in a next life (although the next life can be good or bad - or better or worse, based on whether you engaged in good acts or bad acts). This is where Hinduism comes up with "moksha" - or release from karma. I won;t bore you with what that all means.
The Buddhists seek a similar, albeit different, state - they call it nirvana.
The Jains call such liberation moksha as well, although it too has some differences.
Interesting. My information was based on a class I took on Religions of the East and the stuff I read for it. Obviously, the word has an older meaning I was not aware of. I will, however, say that I think the Buddhists specifically see it as always being a bad thing that prevents us from reaching enlightenment, which to them means the realization that nothing exists, which releases you from the constant state of suffering that is life.
 

CCL36

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Well Karma for the most part is not a "this life reward or punishment" in the middle eastern religous thought. For instance a person's social class (which in many societies is fixed by birth), and any physcial deformities are generally seen as results of a previous life.

And Yes you are right "No Karma" is the goal for the Hindu in order to escape into "nothingness"
 

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Being Mean to People Gets Laughs (Borat)...

But be careful, some people don't like being made fun of...

'Borat' punched in street attack

Borat star Sacha Baron Cohen has been punched by a man who didn't like his jokes.

Cohen approached the passer-by in a New York street and said in the style of his Kazakh alter ego: "I like your clothings. Are nice! Please may I buying? I want have sex with it."

But the target of his joke failed to see the funny side and punched Cohen repeatedly in the face, according to The Sun newspaper.
http://www.online.ie/Entertainment/News.aspx?newsId=527361

Karma?
 

blackadder

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Sacha Cohen's Name is "Mud"

Romanians now unhappy with Cohen.

Now Romanians Say 'Borat' Misled Them
Nov 14 9:08 AM US/Eastern

By WILLIAM J. KOLE
Associated Press Writer

GLOD, Romania

The name of this remote Romanian village means "mud," and that's exactly what angry locals are throwing at comedian Sacha Baron Cohen.
Cohen used Glod's Gypsies as stand-ins for Kazakhs in his runaway hit movie, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan." Now offended villagers are threatening to sue the film's producers for paying them a pittance to put farm animals in their homes and perform other crude antics.

Residents and local officials in the hardscrabble hamlet 85 miles northwest of Bucharest said Tuesday they were horrified and humiliated to learn their abject poverty and simple ways were ridiculed for a movie now raking in millions at box offices worldwide.

"We thought they came here to help us _ not mock us," said Dana Luca, 40, sweeping a manure-stained street lined with shabby homes of crumbling brick and corrugated iron sheeting.

"We haven't got anything here. We haven't got running water. We can't even bathe," she said. "We are poor people, but we are still people."

http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/11/14/D8LCSROO0.html
 

Sandman

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I find it funny how this thread turned completely off subject and went into a discussion about the definition of Karma, only to be brought back on subject by a merging of threads.
 

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"He probably would have received a much worse beating if the "Black Adder" actor wasn't with him."

:9:
 

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