Liam Neeson admits he wanted to kill after friend was raped (1 Viewer)

49erKiller

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Liam Neeson admits he wanted to kill after friend was raped

Neeson says that after being told the attacker was black, he "went up and down areas with a cosh (stick or truncheon)" hoping a black person "would come out of a pub and have a go at me about something, you know? So that I could kill him."
https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/celebrity/liam-neeson-admits-he-wanted-to-kill-after-friend-was-raped/ar-BBTazy7?li=BBnbfcL

I don't know what to make of this.

On a side note, I wasn't sure how to handle the title of this thread, so I went with the article's title. If the admins, mods, or other posters don't like it or are offended, I request and welcome a change by an admin or mod.
 
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guidomerkinsrules

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Problem I have with this? He's making it all about him. You're incensed on behalf of your friend? Cool. Be supportive. But it's not your job to revenge to make it okay for her. That's about YOUr anger, not hers. Find a different way to deal with that.
thank you
you reminded me of a (tangential) story from grad school - -i was heading to a corridor and was going through double doors (no glass) that swung away from me -- on the other side a kid (maybe 4) had gotten too close to the door and got hit when i opened it. the mom immediately dropped and comforted the kid. the dad bowed up like he wanted to hit me, even though he knew it wasn't my fault
i think about that dad from time to time when i or other men get this wave of misplaced or impotent rage/anger
comfort first, fix second
 

Paul

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thank you
you reminded me of a (tangential) story from grad school - -i was heading to a corridor and was going through double doors (no glass) that swung away from me -- on the other side a kid (maybe 4) had gotten too close to the door and got hit when i opened it. the mom immediately dropped and comforted the kid. the dad bowed up like he wanted to hit me, even though he knew it wasn't my fault
i think about that dad from time to time when i or other men get this wave of misplaced or impotent rage/anger
comfort first, fix second
You should have opened the door more gently, you monster.

Announce yourself next time - “hey, is there a 4 year old kid on the other side of this door? I’m about to bust through so step back or get mowed down!”

You fail at manners.
 

Madmarsha

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i think about that dad from time to time when i or other men get this wave of misplaced or impotent rage/anger
comfort first, fix second
I kind of hate the phrase but I think it does fit here: Toxic masculinity

I was raised with a dad who absolutely would have comforted first. It's why I am uncomfortable with and can't begin to understand men like this. "Oh, men fight. It's what they do". And it's completely ineffective conflict resolution.


Just realized I completely sideswiped the race issue on this ... but there's really no point to address it.
 

Paul

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I kind of hate the phrase but I think it does fit here: Toxic masculinity

I was raised with a dad who absolutely would have comforted first. It's why I am uncomfortable with and can't begin to understand men like this. "Oh, men fight. It's what they do". And it's completely ineffective conflict resolution.


Just realized I completely sideswiped the race issue on this ... but there's really no point to address it.
My first reaction is always peaceable, but some guys never learn. That’s when I remove my monacle and top hat and offer to engage in a match of fisticuffs.
 

Arathrael

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The full original article is here: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/liam-neeson-interview-rape-race-black-man-revenge-taken-cold-pursuit-a8760896.html

I think it's absolutely fair to criticise Neeson, and he deserves it. I would also add that it's important for criticism to be directed and fully informed, and it's fair to note that he appears to agree with the criticism; he described it as "awful", and "horrible" himself, and said that while he understands "that need for revenge," "it just leads to more revenge, to more killing and more killing, and Northern Ireland’s proof of that." He's not advocating it, he's condemning it, while recognising his own personal failing in his response to that incident.

He still deserves to be criticised, obviously. He doesn't deserve to be criticised as if he was saying this was a good response, something to be proud of, or even something tolerable, though.
 

Flipx99

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thank you
you reminded me of a (tangential) story from grad school - -i was heading to a corridor and was going through double doors (no glass) that swung away from me -- on the other side a kid (maybe 4) had gotten too close to the door and got hit when i opened it. the mom immediately dropped and comforted the kid. the dad bowed up like he wanted to hit me, even though he knew it wasn't my fault
i think about that dad from time to time when i or other men get this wave of misplaced or impotent rage/anger
comfort first, fix second
On the other hand, you may have been witnessing an evolutionary successful model of a family, complete with a division of responsibilities between male and female. The female first turned to tend to the child, while the male turned to face the perceived threat. Instinctive cooperation among the two sexes.

Probably not something one would learn in a gender studies course.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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On the other hand, you may have been witnessing an evolutionary successful model of a family, complete with a division of responsibilities between male and female. The female first turned to tend to the child, while the male turned to face the perceived threat. Instinctive cooperation among the two sexes.

Probably not something one would learn in a gender studies course.
the problem wasn't the immediate reaction - -it's hard for us to control those
the issue was that he remained flummoxed even after he saw there was no threat

it's maladaptive - -like having a prehensile tail even if we're not brachiating in the trees anymore
 

JimEverett

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I kind of hate the phrase but I think it does fit here: Toxic masculinity

I was raised with a dad who absolutely would have comforted first. It's why I am uncomfortable with and can't begin to understand men like this. "Oh, men fight. It's what they do". And it's completely ineffective conflict resolution.


Just realized I completely sideswiped the race issue on this ... but there's really no point to address it.
I am not trying to act like some meathead, but I think fighting is appropriate in some circumstances.
Or better put - sometimes it is appropriate not to back down and be prepared to fight.

Certainly not in the Neeson situation or the situation guidomerkinsrules described, but some situations call for it.
 

DCSaints_Fan

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The bigger issue is Neeson saying he wanted to go to town on the first black man he found. Not the one that raped his friend. Just any black man. He's blaming an entire ethnicity/race for the actions of one.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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I am not trying to act like some meathead, but I think fighting is appropriate in some circumstances.
Or better put - sometimes it is appropriate not to back down and be prepared to fight.

Certainly not in the Neeson situation or the situation guidomerkinsrules described, but some situations call for it.
“...everyone considered him the coward of the county...”
 

Madmarsha

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The full original article is here: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/features/liam-neeson-interview-rape-race-black-man-revenge-taken-cold-pursuit-a8760896.html

I think it's absolutely fair to criticise Neeson, and he deserves it. I would also add that it's important for criticism to be directed and fully informed, and it's fair to note that he appears to agree with the criticism; he described it as "awful", and "horrible" himself, and said that while he understands "that need for revenge," "it just leads to more revenge, to more killing and more killing, and Northern Ireland’s proof of that." He's not advocating it, he's condemning it, while recognising his own personal failing in his response to that incident.

He still deserves to be criticised, obviously. He doesn't deserve to be criticised as if he was saying this was a good response, something to be proud of, or even something tolerable, though.
Well, I got that, without even reading it, that he wasn't saying it was a thought he was proud of. BUT still, it was his first thought, which, again, means a man trying to make a thing that WASN'T about him ABOUT HIM. Textbook "toxic masculinity". Which is kinda a good illustration what we women's been going on about rausing up such a ruckus.

Look, you don't have to agree with me here before you guys get all your dander up. I'm just offering you guys some insight from my perspective.
 

Arathrael

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The bigger issue is Neeson saying he wanted to go to town on the first black man he found. Not the one that raped his friend. Just any black man. He's blaming an entire ethnicity/race for the actions of one.
No, he did not say that. What he said was bad enough, but that was that he went out "hoping I’d be approached by somebody", who'd "have a go at me about something", so he could take out his anger on them, by killing them.

Not "any black man", or "the first black man he found", but a black man who'd approach him and have a go at him. Which evidently didn't happen.

That's more than bad enough to criticise. He's essentially conflating a random black man who'd approach him and have a go at him with the rapist. But it's not the same as putting literally any black man in that group.

That said, John Barnes (black British football-, sorry, soccer legend) has a different take on it to what I just said, but one which is worth considering I think: https://news.sky.com/story/amp/john-barnes-liam-neeson-deserves-a-medal-for-race-admission-11628709
 

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