Marijuana (1 Viewer)

Should marijuana be legal?

  • Yes, it should be legal and taxed

    Votes: 663 87.6%
  • Yes, but only medically

    Votes: 26 3.4%
  • No, but the marijuana laws should be relaxed

    Votes: 24 3.2%
  • No, it should remain illegal.

    Votes: 44 5.8%

  • Total voters
    757
Joined
Jul 19, 2001
Messages
27,237
Reaction score
72,929
Location
Earth
Offline
The Louisiana bill was scheduled for a vote yesterday, but the bill was pulled at the last minute because it didn't have the votes to pass. Surprise, the Sheriff's Association told all legislators to vote "no" if it came up.
I can't find an article on it, but what I did find makes me think this was only on the recreational bill. The medical seems to be moving forward.


 

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
8,870
Reaction score
9,948
Offline
wow

I had thought that states got rid of the three strike rule
=======================================
The Mississippi Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld a mandatory life sentence for a 38-year-old man convicted of marijuana possession, reasoning that his previous convictions made him a “violent habitual offender” under state law.

Allen Russell was sentenced to life in prison by a Mississippi circuit court in 2019 after a jury convicted him of possessing more than 30 grams of marijuana and prosecutors introduced evidence of his prior convictions during his sentencing hearing.

Under Mississippi law, a person convicted of two separate felonies—at least one of which is violent—and who serves at least one year in prison for each of those felony convictions “shall” be sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility for probation or parole as a violent habitual offender.

Russell in 2004 pleaded guilty to burglary charges for which he served over eight years. In 2015, he pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon for which he served two years.

While Mississippi law designates burglary as a “crime of violence,” that has only been the case since the state legislature changed the law in 2014. Prior to that, at the time when Russell pleaded guilty to burglary, the crime was only designated as a violent crime if the state could prove that actual violence was committed during the commission of the act.

Russell argued on appeal that his enhanced sentence “constitutes cruel and unusual punishment and is grossly disproportionate to the crime committed,”...........

 

tomwaits

Frontier Psychiatrist
Joined
Aug 1, 2002
Messages
16,624
Reaction score
6,685
Age
45
Location
Pflugerville, TX
Offline
wow

I had thought that states got rid of the three strike rule
=======================================
The Mississippi Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld a mandatory life sentence for a 38-year-old man convicted of marijuana possession, reasoning that his previous convictions made him a “violent habitual offender” under state law.

Allen Russell was sentenced to life in prison by a Mississippi circuit court in 2019 after a jury convicted him of possessing more than 30 grams of marijuana and prosecutors introduced evidence of his prior convictions during his sentencing hearing.

Under Mississippi law, a person convicted of two separate felonies—at least one of which is violent—and who serves at least one year in prison for each of those felony convictions “shall” be sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility for probation or parole as a violent habitual offender.

Russell in 2004 pleaded guilty to burglary charges for which he served over eight years. In 2015, he pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon for which he served two years.

While Mississippi law designates burglary as a “crime of violence,” that has only been the case since the state legislature changed the law in 2014. Prior to that, at the time when Russell pleaded guilty to burglary, the crime was only designated as a violent crime if the state could prove that actual violence was committed during the commission of the act.

Russell argued on appeal that his enhanced sentence “constitutes cruel and unusual punishment and is grossly disproportionate to the crime committed,”...........


Here is an example on why more people need to look into jury nullification. ;)
 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
36,863
Reaction score
25,032
Age
50
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
wow

I had thought that states got rid of the three strike rule
=======================================
The Mississippi Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld a mandatory life sentence for a 38-year-old man convicted of marijuana possession, reasoning that his previous convictions made him a “violent habitual offender” under state law.

Allen Russell was sentenced to life in prison by a Mississippi circuit court in 2019 after a jury convicted him of possessing more than 30 grams of marijuana and prosecutors introduced evidence of his prior convictions during his sentencing hearing.

Under Mississippi law, a person convicted of two separate felonies—at least one of which is violent—and who serves at least one year in prison for each of those felony convictions “shall” be sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility for probation or parole as a violent habitual offender.

Russell in 2004 pleaded guilty to burglary charges for which he served over eight years. In 2015, he pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon for which he served two years.

While Mississippi law designates burglary as a “crime of violence,” that has only been the case since the state legislature changed the law in 2014. Prior to that, at the time when Russell pleaded guilty to burglary, the crime was only designated as a violent crime if the state could prove that actual violence was committed during the commission of the act.

Russell argued on appeal that his enhanced sentence “constitutes cruel and unusual punishment and is grossly disproportionate to the crime committed,”...........

Does this guy have any further appeals opportunities? Mississippi state supreme court? Federal appeals?
 

tomwaits

Frontier Psychiatrist
Joined
Aug 1, 2002
Messages
16,624
Reaction score
6,685
Age
45
Location
Pflugerville, TX
Offline
Or, you know, change the laws. ;)

596x397.3333333333333-789086803473.jpg
 

St. Widge

Socially Distant
VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
38,231
Reaction score
22,555
Age
50
Location
4th Ward Soldier
Offline
I mean, you do you. I'm just saying that jury nullification isn't really a long term solution to these issues since it will depend on each jury so it won't consistently stop unjust laws from being enforced. The more effective solution is to change the law.

And, I mean that's beyond the question of whether we really want laws based on an individual person's view of morality. I mean, it's great when they agree with you, but what if they think all laws not in agreement with say the Koran or the Bhagavad Gita are unjust?
 

Goatman Saint

Subscribing Member
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Apr 18, 1999
Messages
22,657
Reaction score
20,955
Age
49
Location
Between here and there
Offline
My new. Plant is so weird. It has no smell. The one I grew a couple years ago you could smell in my neighbors yard. This one even rubbing the leaves, nothing.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users who are viewing this thread

 

New Orleans Saints Twitter Feed

 

Headlines

Top Bottom