Measles outbreaks in localities with lower-than-average vaccination rates (1 Viewer)

superchuck500

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Go figure. Washington state governor has declared a state of emergency over an outbreak that is centered in Clark County - where almost 25% of children are unvaccinated. According to health officials, most of the 55 cases are among unvaccinated children.

Amber Gorrow is afraid to leave her house with her infant son because she lives at the epicenter of Washington state’s worst measles outbreak in more than two decades. Born eight weeks ago, Leon is too young to get his first measles shot, putting him at risk for the highly contagious respiratory virus, which can be fatal in small children.

Gorrow also lives in a community where she said being anti-vaccine is as acceptable as being vegan or going gluten free. Almost a quarter of kids in Clark County, Wash., a suburb of Portland, Ore., go to school without measles, mumps and rubella immunizations, and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) recently declared a state of emergency amid concern that things could rapidly spin out of control.

Measles outbreaks have sprung up in nine other states this winter, but officials are particularly alarmed about the one in Clark County because of its potential to go very big, very quickly.

The Pacific Northwest is home to some of the nation’s most vocal andorganized anti-vaccination activists. That movement has helped drive down child immunizations in Washington, as well as in neighboring Oregon and Idaho, to some of the lowest rates in the country, with as many as 10.5 percent of kindergartners statewide in Idaho unvaccinated for measles. That is almost double the median rate nationally.

Libertarian-leaning lawmakers, meanwhile, have bowed to public pressure to relax state laws to exempt virtually any child from state vaccination requirements whose parents object. Three states allow only medical exemptions; most others also permit religious exemptions. And 17,including Washington, Oregon and Idaho, allow what they call “philosophical” exemptions, meaning virtually anyone can opt out of the requirements.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/it-will-take-off-like-a-wildfire-the-unique-dangers-of-the-washington-state-measles-outbreak/2019/02/06/cfd5088a-28fa-11e9-b011-d8500644dc98_story.html?utm_term=.61ca4eb8327e
 

efil4stnias

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This started over a week ago and was a topic on Stern. He was incensed that in this day and age, measles/mumps can make a comeback because parents do not inoculate. (for various reasons). Older folks were calling in to tell stories when they had measles, mumps, polio, Scarlett fever etc.. His main point was we are undoing decades of medical research that eradicated many of these infections because parents refuse to vaccinate.
 

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This might be one of the few "both sides" issues we can talk about.
Clark county is where I live and I can say the anti-vaxers are about equal parts liberal vegan, gluten-free yahoos and conservative nothing-from-the-gubment yokels.
I can also report that a lot of kids are investigating how they can get themselves vaccinated without alerting their parents.
 
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superchuck500

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This might be one of the few "both sides" issues we can talk about.
Clark county is where I live and I can say the anti-vaxers are about equal parts liberal vegan, gluten-free yahoos and conservative nothing-from-the-gubment yokels.
I can also report that a lot of kids are investigating how they can get themselves vaccinated without alerting their parents.
That’s good for the older ones - but the younger kids (toddlers on to elementary school) won’t likely be able to do that. They’re the most at risk.

Incidence of death overall has been very low - certainly lower than mid-century and before. But it still has to be an awful experience and who knows what the long-term adverse health effects are for measles survivors.
 

Saint_Ward

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NPR had an article a few days ago about how actually getting the measles also makes you more likely to catch other diseases you previously had a resistance to. It resets your immune system. So, if you had chicken pox, now you can get it again, for example.
 

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Dr Jenny McCarthy should be proud. Her doctorate in idiocy from playboy university and the great medical journal Facebook are knocking it out of the park here
 

rob22278

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Libertarian-leaning lawmakers, meanwhile, have bowed to public pressure to relax state laws to exempt virtually any child from state vaccination requirements whose parents object.
Here lies the problem. No vaccines, no admission to school. It’s that simple.
 
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superchuck500

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Here lies the problem. No vaccines, no admission to school. It’s that simple.
State law allows parents to choose not to vaccinate. The public school system is part of that structure - so they can’t (edit - won't) have both a law that allows refusal but another law or policy that the kids can’t go to school without vaccinations.

Private schools could (and some probably do) require it but not public. Our kids pediatrician office refuses to allow unvaccinated kids into the building at all.
 
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rob22278

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Private schools could (and some probably do) require it but not public. Our kids pediatrician office refuses to allow unvaccinated kids into the building at all.
I believe the Archdiocese of NO requires all kids to be vaccinated. I know my kids’ catholic school does.
 

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Sorry, it's an article from 2015

Back in the 1960s, the U.S. started vaccinating kids for measles. As expected, children stopped getting measles.

But something else happened.

Childhood deaths from all infectious diseases plummeted. Even deaths from diseases like pneumonia and diarrhea were cut by half.

....

Like many viruses, measles is known to suppress the immune system for a few weeks after an infection. But previous studies in monkeys have suggested that measles takes this suppression to a whole new level: It erases immune protection to other diseases, Mina says.

So what does that mean? Well, say you get the chicken pox when you're 4 years old. Your immune system figures out how to fight it. So you don't get it again. But if you get measles when you're 5 years old, it could wipe out the memory of how to beat back the chicken pox. It's like the immune system has amnesia, Mina says.

"The immune system kind of comes back. The only problem is that it has forgotten what it once knew," he says.

So after an infection, a child's immune system has to almost start over, rebuilding its immune protection against diseases it has already seen before.
 

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State law allows parents to choose not to vaccinate. The public school system is part of that structure - so they can’t have both a law that allows refusal but another law or policy that the kids can’t go to school without vaccinations.
I don't follow. What's to prevent that? A law saying "You don't have to vaccinate, but if you choose not to, you also choose to home-school. Every kid in public school who can be vaccinated will be."

It's not about you, Mr and Mrs Antivaxer, it's about those kids who can't get vaccinated. They deserve a safe school to go to, one where every kid around them is vaccinated.
 

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That’s essentially how California changed their law in 2016 after the measles outbreak in Disneyland. Before that, any reason you wanted and you didn’t have to vaccinate your kids. Now, unless you have a doctors waiver due to child’s health prohibiting vaccination, you must get your child vaccinated. It was taken to court of course and it withstood the challenge. However, vaccine stays is checked at schools at kinder and 7th grade, and of course college admissions. So, if you want to not vaccinate your children, home school is your only choice.
 
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superchuck500

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I don't follow. What's to prevent that? A law saying "You don't have to vaccinate, but if you choose not to, you also choose to home-school. Every kid in public school who can be vaccinated will be."

It's not about you, Mr and Mrs Antivaxer, it's about those kids who can't get vaccinated. They deserve a safe school to go to, one where every kid around them is vaccinated.
Perhaps I wasn't clear, sorry. What I'm saying is that if the political climate of the state (or the anti-vaccine lobbyists or whatevever) is such that the state refuses to require vaccination, they aren't going to allow a rule that says you can't go to school without being vaccinated. The anti-vaccine and the libertarians would challenge/resist that rule on the basis that it is a de facto requirement for children to be vaccinated.

I'm saying that if the politics are such that the state isn't going to require vaccinations, it isn't likely going to be able have a rule that you have to be vaccinated to go to school . . . it's effectively the same thing. So the same interests that are successful in preventing a state requirement for everyone would likely to be similarly successful fighting a school requirement.
 
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