Mellencamp vs Springsteen (1 Viewer)

DCSaints_Fan

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Not the biggest fan of either but I’d give the edge to Springsteen. Born In Tne Usa beats anything Mellencamp wrote.
 

kansast

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To quote Miami Steve Van Zandt .. Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band... that's the legend. :cool:
 

sfidc3

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BTW why does everyone keep referring to him as “JCM” ? He dropped the Cougar decades ago.. as he’s said , he was basically forced into adopting that moniker by a former manager, and has long since reverted back to his real name… i mean, it‘s ok if you’re talking about say, seeing him in concert in the mid 80s when he WAS John Cougar mellencamp .. but in a general sense, it’s frowned upon In this establishment.

I guess when you are great like Bruce Springsteen no one can force you to change your name….I could care less about his name now, he will always be JCM to me and clearly inferior to Bruce but I still love you…..
 
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Mr. Blue Sky

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I guess when you are great like Bruce Springsteen no one can force you to change your name….I could care less about his name now, he will always be JCM to me and clearly inferior to Bruce but I still love you…..





It’s like i dont even know you any more…
 

sfidc3

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It’s like i dont even know you any more…

Full disclosure, I don’t think JCM is a bad guy or anything but my freshman year in college at LSU Jack and Diane was playing constantly on the radio, in bars, frankly everywhere. I can’t stand to hear that song and turn it off immediately if it comes on the radio….that’s not his fault but my feelings are my feelings….
 
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Mr. Blue Sky

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Full disclosure, I don’t think JCM is a bad guy or anything but my freshman year in college at LSU Jack and Diane was playing constantly on the radio, in bars, frankly everywhere. I can’t stand to hear that song and turn it off immediately if it comes on the radio….that’s not his fault but my feelings are my feelings….



Oh i get it, i too cannot listen to Jack & Diane anymore, it‘s been played about 800,000 times too many…. Still a great tune though, just played out.. very similar to how i cant listen to Brown Eyed Girl anymore, but i still recognize that Van Morrison is a great artist… You shouldn’t let the fact that something got too popular color your view of the artist, unless of course we’re talking about Michael Jackson or somehting.
 

sfidc3

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Oh i get it, i too cannot listen to Jack & Diane anymore, it‘s been played about 800,000 times too many…. Still a great tune though, just played out.. very similar to how i cant listen to Brown Eyed Girl anymore, but i still recognize that Van Morrison is a great artist… You shouldn’t let the fact that something got too popular color your view of the artist, unless of course we’re talking about Michael Jackson or somehting.

That’s because Van Morrison has a vast catalog of unbelievably good music….JCM not so much….you still know me, we just disagree here :)
 

kansast

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Full disclosure, I don’t think JCM is a bad guy or anything but my freshman year in college at LSU Jack and Diane was playing constantly on the radio, in bars, frankly everywhere. I can’t stand to hear that song and turn it off immediately if it comes on the radio….that’s not his fault but my feelings are my feelings….
funny.. there was a ton of stuff.. like that "back in the day", that got played to death on the radio. And yes as a result I learned to HATE those songs. here we are some so many years later. much of which I quit listening to the radio, creating my own playlists using different media, and finding new music by myself. Now today, if I do hear some of those old songs that I got beat to death with, I can listen to them now, and sometimes, I can admit to myself, ya know, this ain't a bad song. :)
 

guidomerkinsrules

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funny.. there was a ton of stuff.. like that "back in the day", that got played to death on the radio. And yes as a result I learned to HATE those songs. here we are some so many years later. much of which I quit listening to the radio, creating my own playlists using different media, and finding new music by myself. Now today, if I do hear some of those old songs that I got beat to death with, I can listen to them now, and sometimes, I can admit to myself, ya know, this ain't a bad song. :)
Interesting thread idea (but would never work)
What songs could withstand constant radio play
Sure maybe you took a break from the song, but you came back to it and found it as strong or stronger than originally
Top of my head vote would be Fast Cars
 

texasjefe

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Springsteen's 1970-1978 catalog, performances, and history is pure greatness.

...rock ballads, Dylanesque lyrics in the 1st half of the decade, mastery of rock and jazz rock, a unique sound and branding with his band that emanated from playing the small clubs of the Jersey shore, the hunger and rise to stardom fueled by radio broadcasts of his shows, revelations by DJ's in NY, Cleveland, and Philly, and Dave Marsh's writing in the iconic music magazines of that era, the marathon shows and the storytelling within it, the drive of writing hundreds of unreleased songs that fueled an underground following and intensity of bootlegging and collecting, the dual Time and Newsweek mag covers, and the conflicts he faced - fighting his former manager for the rights to the songs (which sidelined Bruce from publishing from 1976-fall 1978), and the living with the luck of not getting drafted to Vietnam in the 1960's when so many of his friends did.

By 1980 - my opinion - Bruce and his manager Jon Landau took a wrong but understandable turn with The River, a double album that was a mishmash of attempts to create superficial pop hits (which was not his strong-suit given his eclectic talent), some great late 70's songs that were loved in concert but had not yet made it onto records (Point Blank, Ties That Bind, Sherry Darling), an overfocus on synth keys as other 70's supergroups had succeeded with, and in general the leap to building a worldwide audience, making big money, and then appealing to the MTV craze.

If in 1980 you saw the No Nukes movie with Bruce on the big screen playing Thunder Road, The River, and Quarter to Three - I personally wish Bruce would've put out a concert film instead of The River album, and taken his place in the pantheon of Midnight Movies like Song Remains the Same and Rocky Horror.

But we got the River, and the 80's, and while still incredible to go to his shows, it was a big step down in the studio musically from the 70's quality with the weird Nebraska solo album (a precursor album to folk alt-country), Born in the USA (a song that was originally called Vietnam), the way too late mid-80's concert album with some lyrics that changed R-rated lines to PG, and then the melancholy 1988 Tunnel of Love, where he was already pushing aside his band-mates, The 1990's were more a decline musically, where he took up a new band, and then dove more into folk alt-country. Of course there were still good songs coming out, but he seemed to be in a long identity crisis.

He did not right the ship until he brought the band back together for the Reunion Tour in 1999, and I consider all of his full band tours since 1999 to just be one-long 17 year Reunion Tour.

Back to the The River album, this song Drive All Night which Where Yat Brah posted the 1980 version on page 3 was surely a nice melodic slow ballad on its own, but earlier in 1978 shows it was a far more riveting attachment to Backstreets, a sequel called either Drive All Night or Sad Eyes about an attempt to re-unite with the partner in Backstreets, that failed. This is exhibit A in my belief that a concert movie would have been a better release in 1980. Thank God we do have 1978 arena in-house videos of shows in Phoenix, Houston, and Passaic - and radio broadcasts of shows in Cleveland, Atlanta, Passaic, and L.A. And the official The Promise box set of music, show video, and a Thom Zimny documentary, chronicling the anniversary of the Darkness on the Edge of Town anniversary was phenomenal.



As for John no longer Cougar Mellancamp, I have no words to offer or compare. I heard his early 80's hits, dismissed him at the time as a Springsteen-copying poser, and never listened again.
 
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Mr. Blue Sky

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Springsteen's 1970-1978 catalog, performances, and history is pure greatness.

...rock ballads, Dylanesque lyrics in the 1st half of the decade, mastery of rock and jazz rock, a unique sound and branding with his band that emanated from playing the small clubs of the Jersey shore, the hunger and rise to stardom fueled by radio broadcasts of his shows, revelations by DJ's in NY, Cleveland, and Philly, and Dave Marsh's writing in the iconic music magazines of that era, the marathon shows and the storytelling within it, the drive of writing hundreds of unreleased songs that fueled an underground following and intensity of bootlegging and collecting, the dual Time and Newsweek mag covers, and the conflicts he faced - fighting his former manager for the rights to the songs (which sidelined Bruce from publishing from 1976-fall 1978), and the living with the luck of not getting drafted to Vietnam in the 1960's when so many of his friends did.

By 1980 - my opinion - Bruce and his manager Jon Landau took a wrong but understandable turn with The River, a double album that was a mishmash of attempts to create superficial pop hits (which was not his strong suit given his eclectic talent), some great late 70's songs that were loved in concert but had not made it onto records (Point Blank, Ties That Bind, Sherry Darling), an overfocus on synth keys as other 70's supergroups had succeeded with, and in general the leap to building a worldwide audience, making big money, and then appealing to the MTV craze.

If in 1980 you saw the No Nukes movie with Bruce on the big screen playing Thunder Road, The River, and Quarter to Three - i personally wish Bruce would've put out a concert film instead of The River album, and taken his place in the pantheon of Midnight Movies like Song Remains the Same and Rocky Horror.

But we got the River, and the 80's, and while still incredible to go to his shows, it was a step down from the 70's quality with the weird Nebraska solo album (a precursor album to folk alt-country), Born in the USA (a song that was originally called Vietnam), the way too late mid-80's concert album with some lyrics that changed R-rated lines to PG,, and then the melancholy 1988 Tunnel of Love, where he was already pushing aside his band-mates, The 1990's were more a decline, where he took up a new band, and then dove more into folk alt-country. Of course there were still good songs coming out, but he seemed to be in a long identity crisis.

He did not right the ship until he brought the band back together for the Reunion Tour in 1999, and I consider all of his full band tours since 1999 to just be one-long 17 year Reunion Tour.

Back to the The River album, this song Drive All Night which Where Yat Brah posted the 1980 version on page 3 was surely a nice melodic slow ballad on its own, but earlier in 1978 shows it was a far more riveting attachment to Backstreets, a sequel called either Drive All Night or Sad Eyes about an attempt to re-unite with the partner in Backstreets, that failed. This is exhibit A in my belief that a concert movie would have been a better release in 1980. Thank God we do have 1978 arena-produced videos of shows in Phoenix, Houston, and Passaic - and radio broadcasts of shows in Cleveland, Atlanta, Passaic, and L.A. And the official The Promise box set of music, show video, and a Thom Zimny documentary, chronicling the anniversary of the Darkness on the Edge of Town anniversary box set phenomenal.


As for John no longer Cougar Mellancamp, I have no words to offer or compare. I heard his early 80's hits, dismissed him at the time as a Springsteen-copying poser, and never listened again.




You guys in this thread all tried, and in various ways, mostly failed , to make compelling arguments for BS…. but this guy , Jefe, did a good job……. I disagree with his take that JM basically has no merit, but i like his take on The Boss’ musical output, in general.
 

saintmdterps

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Interesting thread idea (but would never work)
What songs could withstand constant radio play
Sure maybe you took a break from the song, but you came back to it and found it as strong or stronger than originally
Top of my head vote would be Fast Cars
I never got tired of Big Country's In a Big Country
 
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Is there a Tacoes option?

This. I respect those musicians, but definitely not my style.

I would say, John Denver would be preferred over them two, if it's like heart and Americana soft rock. Not sure if that's a genre, but I would stick all them in there, if it was.

I like Bob Dylan, just not as much as most. Joey Ramone vs. Kurt Cobain would be more of my type of thread.


If had to pick between Springsteen or Mellencamp, probably fall asleep at the wheel in boredom having to decide. Let me know who wins though, don't know how exactly you would pick a winner.
 

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