N/S calling all smart people (1 Viewer)

Rdanderson91

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Ok so I had a question creep into my head the other day after consuming a few beers. Everyone knows that a potential tackler has a better shot at tackling a runner by taking an angle at the runner. But according to the Pythagorean Theorem that we all learned in fifth grade, the angle, C,(that the tackler is taking) is a longer distance than what the runner, B, would be taking. My question is how does it give the tackler a better chance at catching up if the distance he has to travel is greater than what the runner's is? I can't come up with an answer.
 
Because the pythagorean theorem only applies to right triangles and this example does not necessarily have to do with a right triangle.

And you take an angle because you get them tackled at a shorter gain than if you were to go directly horizontal across the field..

and C is only longer to the starting point.. the angle matters because the player is still traveling. Are you still drunk?
 
Its easier to tackle someone when at an angle because you're limiting their options. If someone is coming right at you they can juke in either direction. I don't think it has anything to do with math. If you're trying to chase someone down, chasing them at an angle would definitely be harder than running in a straight line behind them.
 
Because the pythagorean theorem only applies to right triangles and this example does not necessarily have to do with a right triangle.

And you take an angle because you get them tackled at a shorter gain than if you were to go directly horizontal across the field..

and C is only longer to the starting point.. the angle matters because the player is still traveling. Are you still drunk?



Hahaha no not yet, I'm workin on it. I see where you're coming from tho, if the tackler and the runner started at the same yard line, the tackler would never catch him. This question just been buggin me for a while.
 
Ok so I had a question creep into my head the other day after consuming a few beers. Everyone knows that a potential tackler has a better shot at tackling a runner by taking an angle at the runner. But according to the Pythagorean Theorem that we all learned in fifth grade, the angle, C,(that the tackler is taking) is a longer distance than what the runner, B, would be taking. My question is how does it give the tackler a better chance at catching up if the distance he has to travel is greater than what the runner's is? I can't come up with an answer.

Beer? you sure it wasn't a drag on a left handed cigarette?
 
You're dealing with vectors, not a right triangle. You're taking into consideration the closest point where you will meet the runner in regards to your angle of travel and velocity as well as his angle of travel and velocity. Pythagorean Theorem has nothing to do with this. The brain of a good player doesn't necessarily make these mathematical calculations in his head, rather it's repetition, recognition, and anticipation.
 
You are x distance from the ball carrier. You pick the angle in an attempt to minimize the distance y
 
Nope I drive :9:

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At least tell me you get great mileage....
 
If you are in the center of the field and the ball carrier is at the sideline.... Can you cover 20 yards by the time he goes 5? How about 30 by the time he does 18? How about 60 by the time he does 55? The wider the angle you take to the sideline the better the ratio gets and the more time you get to cover the gap too
 
well like they said above you are really dealing with vectors but if you wanted to simplify it and look at it as a triangle then you can. you are thinking that the distance of side C the hypotenuse is longer than the side B that the runner is traveling and it is. However you forgot about the side A of said triangle. The defender has to travel both A and B to get to the same point the runner will be at. There are two ways to get to the top of the triangle so to speak. You can either travel the side C or you can travel A+B. C is always < A+B.

Again it really isn't this simple as you are dealing with triangles that are not always right angles and the players are both moving which is why we mentioned vectors but I thought I would point out your missing piece.
 

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