NCAA says California schools could be banned from championships if state passes compensation bill (1 Viewer)

jboss

All-Pro
Joined
Dec 2, 2008
Messages
2,306
Reaction score
1,039
Age
31
Offline
NCAA shooting for FIFA level corruption with this one.
 

MLU

Please respect my decision!
Joined
Apr 28, 1999
Messages
54,961
Reaction score
20,672
Location
Mesa, AZ
Offline
Can you imagine a 10-1 USC or Stanford missing the Rose Bowl because of this?

This would last 1 season until the best players in the country that don't sign with Bama and Clemson start flocking to the Cali schools. The other conferences will push the NCAA for relief real quick.
 

DJ1BigTymer

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
May 1, 2006
Messages
4,867
Reaction score
7,349
Age
47
Offline

ATLANTA (AP) — The Latest on the NCAA task force’s report on the feasibility of allowing athletes to profit from their names and images (all times local):

2:30 p.m.

The chairman of the NCAA board of governors says the association hopes to avoid a court battle against states that are attempting to pass laws aimed at dismantling the NCAA’s rules.

The NCAA board voted on Tuesday to allow athletes to profit from their names, images and likenesses, but much work still needs to be done to determine how that will work within NCAA rules.
Seems like Cali is leading the way! This is a huge win for the student athletes, they will be able to profit of their name and likeness. No longer will they have to fear of losing their eligibility for merely selling their autographs.
 

NEBaghead

Sir, a jelly doughnut, sir!
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2004
Messages
2,248
Reaction score
1,708
Age
47
Location
Papillion, NE
Offline



Seems like Cali is leading the way! This is a huge win for the student athletes, they will be able to profit of their name and likeness. No longer will they have to fear of losing their eligibility for merely selling their autographs.
The NCAA had to capitulate. Top recruits would go to California schools to make money. The average player isn't going to benefit much from this except for deals where they can show up at events and get paid for being there. It's a good move though and I back it.
 

superchuck500

guarding the potatoes
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Diamond VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
55,351
Reaction score
82,414
Location
Mt. Pleasant, SC
Offline
The NCAA had to capitulate. Top recruits would go to California schools to make money. The average player isn't going to benefit much from this except for deals where they can show up at events and get paid for being there. It's a good move though and I back it.
Can they get paid for that? I saw it only as name and likeness - so like merchandise and video game licensing, etc.
 

DCSaints_Fan

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,876
Reaction score
1,917
Location
San Jose, CA
Offline
Can they get paid for that? I saw it only as name and likeness - so like merchandise and video game licensing, etc.
And it if its connected to the school/team, they would have to allow permission (along with $$$). So Zion Williamson, college basketball player, could get money from Nike, but not Zion Williamson, UNC basketball player. At least not without UNC's explicit permission.

I think for really top end guys, like Williamson, this changes things. Beause he's so recongizable he coudl have done commercials without assosciating himself with UNC. Lots of NFL players do this so they don't have to split endorsement money with the NFL.

Colleges doi sell player jerseys and I'm not sure how that will work. If there's no name on the jersey (just a number) its possible the player wouldn't get compensated at all.
 

superchuck500

guarding the potatoes
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Diamond VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
55,351
Reaction score
82,414
Location
Mt. Pleasant, SC
Offline
And it if its connected to the school/team, they would have to allow permission (along with $$$). So Zion Williamson, college basketball player, could get money from Nike, but not Zion Williamson, UNC basketball player. At least not without UNC's explicit permission.

I think for really top end guys, like Williamson, this changes things. Beause he's so recongizable he coudl have done commercials without assosciating himself with UNC. Lots of NFL players do this so they don't have to split endorsement money with the NFL.

Colleges doi sell player jerseys and I'm not sure how that will work. If there's no name on the jersey (just a number) its possible the player wouldn't get compensated at all.
I thought the origin of this was video games that have game versions of players that look like and have the same attributes as college players. So it was obviously their likeness and was going uncompensated.
 

DJ1BigTymer

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
May 1, 2006
Messages
4,867
Reaction score
7,349
Age
47
Offline
Then there's this:

Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., said scholarship money received by college athletes who take endorsement money should be treated — and taxed — like income.

“If college athletes are going to make money off of their likeness while in school, their scholarships should be treated like income,” Burr said over Twitter. He said plans to introduce legislation that taxes scholarships for college athletes who choose to “cash in.”
Kind of dick move Richard, the money that they make will already be taxed as income, no need to add an additional tax.

 
Last edited:

DCSaints_Fan

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
4,876
Reaction score
1,917
Location
San Jose, CA
Offline
I thought the origin of this was video games that have game versions of players that look like and have the same attributes as college players. So it was obviously their likeness and was going uncompensated.
The new rule will open up new avenues of endorsements that college players were previously outright banned from doing. So if Zion Williamson and Nike or Gatorade or whoeever wants to do a commercial where's playing basketball in generic clothes, and endorsing a product, he's free to do that and the NCAA and UNC cannot prevent him or impose discipline. As long there is no direction assoasciation of himself with the NCAA and UNC. Or have paid appearances, signings etc. Basically anything tha pros do now. Like I said, it gets more complicated when player assosciates himself with the team/school (because its not just his/her likelness, but also the teams/schools)
 

V Chip

Truth Addict (aww ^&%$ I got a head rush)
VIP Subscribing Member
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 14, 2001
Messages
12,913
Reaction score
17,103
Age
52
Location
Close enough to ATL to smell the stink of Falcons
Offline
Then there's this:



Kind of dick move Richard, the money that they make will already be taxed as income, no need to add an additional tax.

Plus he's a moron, opening the door for all scholarships for everyone -- not just athletes -- to be treated as income and taxed.
 

superchuck500

guarding the potatoes
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Diamond VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
55,351
Reaction score
82,414
Location
Mt. Pleasant, SC
Offline
Here's the text of the law - it has some interesting provisions. https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200SB206

For example, a player cannot accept a deal that conflicts with his school's existing contracts. I think that means, for example, that an Oregon Ducks player cannot accept a deal to appear in an Addidas ad, or have an Addidas shoe - because of Oregon's contractual relationship with Nike.

But here's my question: what is the extent of "name, image, and likeness"? I understand that easily applies to merchandise, video games, and other kinds of endorsements. But does that apply to paid appearances? What's the difference between Zion Williamson (still at Duke) getting paid $50K to be at a basketball camp and Zion Williamson getting paid $50K to be in a celebrity basketball game and Zion Williamson getting paid $500K to play for a local minor league pro team while still at Duke?

At some point, there's a difference between being paid for your name and likeness and actually being paid to perform. I just wonder where that line is.
 

JLaneSaints

Hall-of-Famer
VIP Contributor
Joined
Sep 5, 2011
Messages
3,682
Reaction score
2,959
Offline
I am interested to see all the fine print and how this turns out. Can non boosters start a go fund me to pay a player to go to a certain school? Can a player start a twitch stream and get funded that way? If I was a millionaire business owner, can I call up Zion the 2nd and pay him to be in a commercial with the undertones to go to a certain school?

I'm not against players earning money off themselves. But this could go sideways very fast. I really do not think it will be a huge impact on college basketball, as there are only so many spots on each team, and enough overall talent to keep things somewhat competitive. But for, say, college football, there is an avenue to make things worse than they already are in terms of competitive balance.
 

superchuck500

guarding the potatoes
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Diamond VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
55,351
Reaction score
82,414
Location
Mt. Pleasant, SC
Offline
I am interested to see all the fine print and how this turns out. Can non boosters start a go fund me to pay a player to go to a certain school? Can a player start a twitch stream and get funded that way? If I was a millionaire business owner, can I call up Zion the 2nd and pay him to be in a commercial with the undertones to go to a certain school?

I'm not against players earning money off themselves. But this could go sideways very fast. I really do not think it will be a huge impact on college basketball, as there are only so many spots on each team, and enough overall talent to keep things somewhat competitive. But for, say, college football, there is an avenue to make things worse than they already are in terms of competitive balance.
Agreed - the questions on where the boundaries lie are compelling. I don't see how boosters could just pay a player to go to a school. But it seems like you could have a consortium of boosters offer a package of endorsement deals should the player go to that school.

For example: Come to Baton Rouge and you'll have the following waiting for you:
- $50K endorsement deal from Baton Rouge Chevrolet
- $100K endorsement deal from Raising Cane's

Etc.
 

guidomerkinsrules

W H A T E V I R
VIP Contributor
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
58,575
Reaction score
93,736
Location
by the cemeteries
Online
And it if its connected to the school/team, they would have to allow permission (along with $$$). So Zion Williamson, college basketball player, could get money from Nike, but not Zion Williamson, UNC basketball player. At least not without UNC's explicit permission.

I think for really top end guys, like Williamson, this changes things. Beause he's so recongizable he coudl have done commercials without assosciating himself with UNC. Lots of NFL players do this so they don't have to split endorsement money with the NFL.

Colleges doi sell player jerseys and I'm not sure how that will work. If there's no name on the jersey (just a number) its possible the player wouldn't get compensated at all.
From what I’ve read, it allows ‘down market‘ athletes to get paid off YouTube channels and the like
I’d imagine a college level Simone Biles would have made some $$ on YouTube
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)



Headlines

Top Bottom