Needed: Sauce Piquant recipe (1 Viewer)

MamaSaint

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My hubby, bless his heart, is an adventuresome eater. I am very happy about this since ex-hubby #1 was a very picky eater (meat, potatoes/rice & gravy, no vegetables). Mike has decided he would like to try some different & exotic (to him) meats, so this week-end we are placing a sizeable order with cajungrocer.com. We are getting some alligator meat and frog legs along with some Gulf shrimp & other assorted Louisiana goodies including some Zapp's Creole Tomato chips.

I want to fix an alligator sauce piquant, but don't have a good recipe. Most of my Louisiana cook books are back in Louisiana.

Anybody have some tried-and-true recipes to share? I will be very grateful for any & all. :)

Jan
 

ibelieve

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Here is a recipe we used when we made it during the season for tailgating.

2lbs of gator meat
2 tablespoons of garlic powder
2 tablespoons of cajun seasoning
4 cups of choped onion
2 cups of worcestershire
1 cup of soy sause
6 tablespoons of lemon juice
2 cup of veggie oil
2 cup of chopped celery
8 cloves of garlic
2 cup chopped bell pepper
4 15oz cans of stewed tomatoes
2 15oz cans of can tomatoes
4 bay leaves
2 tablesspoons of sugar
4 beef boulillon cubes
Salt and pepper

Serves 16

Sprinkle meat with garlic powder and cajun seasoning. Place in a covered dish and fry in vegetable oil in a skillet untill meat is brown. Place meat ina 6 qt pot. Draing oil, leaving about 3 tablespoons in the skillet. Add the rest of the onions, celery, garlic and bell pepper. Saute until tender. Add vegetables, marinade and all other ingredients to meat. Cook for 45 min on medium heat. Season to tast and serve over rice.


I know we may have did a few things different but it came out great.
 

TPS

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Sauce Piqunte is one Louisiana recipe that I just don't like at all. I find it boring considering all the great flavors that come from down here. I've had *.* Sauce Piquante and it all pretty much sucked. If you want to try Louisiana stuff, there are better sauces to fool with. Much better.

TPS
 
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MamaSaint

MamaSaint

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Sauce Piqunte is one Louisiana recipe that I just don't like at all. I find it boring considering all the great flavors that come from down here. I've had *.* Sauce Piquante and it all pretty much sucked. If you want to try Louisiana stuff, there are better sauces to fool with. Much better.

TPS

Thanks to all. Steve, what sauce would you suggest for alligator?

Jan
 

TPS

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>>Thanks to all. Steve, what sauce would you suggest for alligator?

Sauce Piquante? :shrug:

just kidding. I actually live in the Sauce Piquante Capital of the World (Raceland). It really depends on what it is you are doing with it. Assuming the tail meat is high quality, then you can do anything with it. So by that, again, it depends on the preparation. Btw mamasaint, I didn't realize this was you (thought it was Mommy Saint).

The best way I've ever had alligator was pounded and panneed at Cafe Vermilionville in Lafayette, LA. They pound it into very thin filets, bread them, and then batter and fry. Despite it's relative toughness (which you beat out of it), alligator is a pretty subtle flavor that takes on the flavors of what you cook it in. A nice meneure sauce would go well with fried/panneed cutlets, a marchands de vin would work, probably a hollandaise or even a bechemel would go pretty well. If you were going to smoke it, a more bbqy type sauce (such as piquant) is probably best or any other favorite savory-type sauce. You can put it in jambalaya, you can stew it, you can even grind it up and make meatballs out of it. Think of alligator (de-toughened of course) like you would a chicken breast or piece of veal. Whatever you do with them you can do with the alligator.

Hope that helps get those cooking juices flowing.

TPS
 

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Yep. One sauce, two cups.
D'oh. :covri:


I'm gonna have to go ahead and agree with Steve here. Never been a big sauce piquant fan myself. I mean, it's decent, I'll certainly eat it if it's offered to me...

...but Jan... judging by your original post there, isn't the whole point to do something other than rice & gravy?

IMHO, sauce piquant = rice & tweaked gravy. Meh.

If I had a fresh batch of alligator tailmeat, I'd probably pull out the grinder and look up some sort of meat pie recipe. Natchitoches or otherwise. Or maybe the Jazz Fest alligator stuffed bread. There's gotta be a reasonable recipe for that out there.

Or, blasphemous as this may sound, they do great things with alligator in Florida. Google some Florida gator recipes. No reason to confine yourself to South LA. I know you already know this, but man, you can find good eats all over. Try some sort of thing straight out of the Everglades. :9:
 

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