Perspective (1 Viewer)

SaintsMan209

SB This year!
VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 11, 2004
Messages
2,443
Reaction score
2,557
Age
39
Location
East Bay, California
Offline
Look guys. We all know we are the Saints. We don't want to go back to these days...

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QOWaRgEFozU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

blackadder

...from a chicken, bugwit
VIP Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Messages
30,536
Reaction score
23,446
Offline
Look guys. We all know we are the Saints. We don't want to go back to these days...

<iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QOWaRgEFozU" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" width="560"></iframe>
So what? Don't see much wrong there.

What year is the video? If it's anytime up the early 90s we playing very respectable football.
 

crosswatt

Gone Fishing.
Staff member
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 10, 2001
Messages
32,282
Reaction score
46,065
Location
Chesapeake, VA
Offline
Look guys. We all know we are the Saints. We don't want to go back to these days...
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
 

efrohnap66

Pro-Bowler
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
712
Reaction score
1,280
Location
Germany
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
Drop the mike...nuff said...perfect:plus-un2:
 

bobad

Son of Adam
VIP Contributor
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
25,110
Reaction score
17,926
Location
Saints Country
Offline
First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't.
One would think beating up the coach, the players, and each other gives us some kind of control. Otherwise we wouldn't do it over and over.
 

bobad

Son of Adam
VIP Contributor
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
25,110
Reaction score
17,926
Location
Saints Country
Offline
So what? Don't see much wrong there.
Indeed. Nothing at all wrong with a coach calling out lackluster play.


The only thing that would make me worry is the coach doesn't seem to be enjoying his job. Of course a coach enjoying his job is not worth reporting.
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2014
Messages
146
Reaction score
230
Location
La.
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.


Great post crosswatt:9:
 

Swimmer

Medsamust Saint Fan
Joined
Apr 14, 2007
Messages
16,806
Reaction score
24,235
Age
68
Location
Slaughterhouse Five
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
One of the best Posts I've read this year. Cross - you and I often see things different, but I think what you said in this post transcends any online disagreements into what being a real Saints fan means at the end of the day. At the end of the day, all of us at games or bars will be screaming Geaux Saints and Who Dat arm-in-arm, hugs around, whether our record in 10-4 and 4-10. Thx very much - Great Stuff! :potd:
 

St.Fury

Staff member
Administrator
VIP Subscribing Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Messages
23,085
Reaction score
25,867
Age
39
Location
Houma, La.
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
Perfectly stated! Thank you, sir!
 

duckjr78

Look out, its FrankenBaby
VIP Contributor
Joined
Apr 13, 2005
Messages
6,142
Reaction score
6,009
Age
42
Location
Destin, Fl
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.

Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
One of the single best interwebz posts I have ever read. Thank you.
 

faithhopebush

Pro-Bowler
Joined
May 2, 2006
Messages
906
Reaction score
770
Location
Austin
Offline
..... but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us. ....

....And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors. .....


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.
.....
As others have stated, Excellent articulation. Especially the above parts.
 

blackadder

...from a chicken, bugwit
VIP Contributor
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Messages
30,536
Reaction score
23,446
Offline
Indeed. Nothing at all wrong with a coach calling out lackluster play.


The only thing that would make me worry is the coach doesn't seem to be enjoying his job. Of course a coach enjoying his job is not worth reporting.
In that video Mora is angry because reporters ran over to an injured player on the ground and crowded around shoving cameras in his face as he lay on the ground in pain.

Good on Mora. That's the worst angle of the way the media work to sensationalize anything.

Mora was a fiery guy with a temper. Many competitors are. I have no problem with that at all. You could argue his "coulda, woulda, shoulda" speech sparked the awakening of the franchise to respectability.

You can have a fiery coach and that's fine. Says nothing about what we are as a franchise. The bigger problem IMO is chain of command and full spectrum decision making on finance and talent acquisition.

IMO, this is what we lack and have lacked for a long time, even back the latter Mora days and it has never really been put right. When Jim Finks died that was the beginning of the end for Mora. Mora was a coach not a GM, talent evaluator etc.

Bill Kuharich was a joke, Randy Mueller aborted mid stream with mismanaging Benson's money and other dodgy organizational issues and then we got Loomis via promotion from inside. Loomis is a great organizational GM, capologist and contract negotiator but I don't see that he has ever been someone that the Hasletts or Paytons of the world have truly answered to on football and personnel matters up to the time that Benson decided it was time to make a change and Loomis delivered the message.

The OP is trying to say something about the franchise not backsliding, but it's more to do with more gravitas and better football IQ in the GM, not an emotional fiery coach. Belichek has been like that with the media at times throughout his run and has nothing to do with success of the franchise.

Having Drew Brees has papered over a lot of mistakes and deficiencies in decisions by the franchise over the last 10 years, especially the last five. If there is a danger we return to bad football when he is done it's because IMO we lack the strong GM who someone like Payton, with his own ego, is going to accept that he answers to on final personnel and big picture strategy decisions.

If somehow on the other end of this cap hell and transition to post-Brees world the team falls to shambles, I think it's time to look at the GM position and splitting between a football/personnel manager and decision maker and finance/cap/contract position that Loomis would hopefully want to keep.

Something is missing at the top.
 

noser222

ALL-MADDEN TEAM
Joined
Feb 23, 2015
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
1,813
Offline
For all the Mora Carl Smith conservative offense criticism, those offenses were a big time playmaker away from putting the team at the top level. The Steve Walsh trade really screwed that up.
A real deep threat WR or a beast of a RB.
 

HoustonSaint68

Subscribing Member
Staff member
Super Moderator
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Platinum VIP Contributor
Joined
Oct 21, 2001
Messages
5,225
Reaction score
3,972
Offline
Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.
What a great post.

I think the difference is that, in the old (especially pre-Mora days), we didn't focus on the outcome of the entire season but rather saw the season as 16 (or 14 for us old guys) separate opportunities to hopefully win a game and enjoy a Monday with an extra bounce in our step. Now we have been trained away from being elated with an individual win, but can only see a win relative to what it means to our playoff chances in the context of the entire season. It happened to me too, especially with the high expectations of 2010 and 2011, and feeling cheated in 2012.

But now I accept that we're on the slide down. I'm grateful for the Super Bowl and would have liked a second Lombardi. But now it's time to be grateful primarily for the greatness of Drew Brees, and the 16 individual opportunities that he will give me to enjoy a Saints win and appreciate his Hall of Fame greatness with my own eyes (provided he stays upright that long behind this offensive line :hihi: ).

And also to be grateful that we still have our Saints in New Orleans for the foreseeable future, win or lose. Because I still clearly remember listening to them on the radio playing the Bears in Tiger Stadium in 2005, with a shovel in my hands and my hair and legs and arms and fingernails smeared with Katrina nastiness. And I remember thinking that the team would be gone soon, and feeling a sense of utter hopelessness about keeping them home.

There is no right or wrong here. Each fan has the right to their own expectations and feelings about what the organization owes its fans. But for me, and maybe it's just the old survival instinct kicking in from the Mecom days, I prefer Crosswatt's path of putting the efforts of our Boys back in the context of a hobby and not a life-and-death endeavor.

Besides, at the end of the day, the Falcons still haven't won a Super Bowl.
 

primadox

Hurricane Bear Moderator
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 1, 1997
Messages
16,940
Reaction score
5,158
Age
57
Location
Houston TX, via Parsippany, NJ and New Orleans
Offline
Alright. This looks like as good of a thread as any to let loose in. I've been holding back a bit, but I just can't do it anymore.

First of all, we have no control as to what days we go back to or don't. As fans, our only duty is to decide if we're going to root for a specific team or not. We have no control, we have no input, and the league is way too volatile and based on luck and happenstance for anyone to really have "control".

To expound on that a bit, was it really that bad when we were the NFL's lovable losers? I mean it wasn't fun as far as losing games, but there was a shared misery among the fan base that really created a connection between us.


There's very little better then shared misery to unify people in this world. Have somebody start talking about being broke in a room full of people, and every single person has a story to tell or an anecdote to throw into the conversation about their own finances. We love it when we can identify with somebody with a problem. It makes our problems seem more normal.

And being a Saints fan for many years was just that same example of shared survival. If you saw someone in a Saints hat or shirt, you knew. You knew they were a true fan. You knew that they cared about the city and the team and weren't there just because Drew Brees is awesome or the team has been winning lately. You knew that they had New Orleans in their heart, and that created an instant connection between the two of you, regardless of any other factors.


While I would never trade the Super Bowl win and the feelings that it brought, I have to be honest and admit that I sometimes miss that certainty of identification in another Saints fan.


Instead of that camaraderie, lately we've begun to turn on ourselves. We vehemently debate the value of a third-string guard, and fight too many battles amongst ourselves over bottom of the roster churn, and whether or not it's ever going to lead to another championship. And we're not doing it with friendly debate; we're getting borderline nasty and personal way too often.


In short, I fear we're taking it too seriously. It's becoming like a job, instead of like a fun hobby. And we aren't expressing opinions as much as trying to get our perspective across as facts. That's the point when we really begin to lose what we once had as a brotherhood.

For those of us scattered across the rest of the world, the Saints are very important. It's a connection to our heritage. To many of our's home. And even in Louisiana and New Orleans, the Saints are simply more important than other teams are to their respective fan bases. They were all that we had for years, and holding on to them and their improbable run during the Katrina era was something that helped countless people deal with the problems of their life, and realize that they could rise above it once again and be great.

The problem is that now we are almost too emotionally tied in and, as a result, we tend to overstate the importance of winning a football game. If the Saints were to somehow descend again into lovable loser status, that doesn't mean that we would turn into failures as people. It just means that there's one more hill for the team to climb, and can serve as a reminder that even if we have to dig our way out of a hole again, we can do it.

Our perspective should be that this team has a chance to win a lot of football games this year, and they also have a chance to lose a lot of football games this year. It's uncertain. It's not predetermined. We really have no clue how it's going to turn out. And if you're being 100% honest, that's the beauty of sports. Anything can happen. And that sense of unknown and wonder, in my opinion anyway, is what truly makes Sports great. And that I think is the perspective that we all should try to attain.
:potd:

I very, very rarely give those out. But this post was a no-brainer to get a POTD award, IMO.

I agree 100% that with the success of the team has come a sort of fickleness in the fan base; I miss that unique sense of loyalty the fans had towards the team when the team couldn't deliver what the fans really deserved. It was almost an unconditional connection between the team, the fans, and the city. Didn't matter if they won or not; we still loved them, and their reputation as lovable losers made the relationship even more special and unique. As much as I've enjoyed the winning, there's parts of the losing years that I do miss.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)



New Orleans Saints Twitter Feed

Headlines

Top Bottom