Police Shootings / Possible Abuse Threads [merged] (3 Viewers)

Grandadmiral

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My take....it seems clear that he wasn't trying to injure the officers, he was trying to escape. So, at that point, the thought "it's not a stretch to think he'd try again" changes. After all, the only way he'd try again is if another group tried to encircle his car and block him in.
From what some of reporting, firing into the vehicle is against that department's policy. Supposedly it states that officers are not to fire into a moving vehicle. And it makes sense to say this as that vehicle could then injure others.
 
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Grandadmiral

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Officers :"He died from injuries sustained from the crash"
Video: offices beating him to death.
But they'll face no consequence I'm sure.
And taxpayers will be stuck footing the bill on another wrongful death case.
 

sfidc3

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From what some of reporting, firing into the vehicle is against that department's policy. Supposedly it states that officers are not to fire into a moving vehicle. And it makes since to say this as that vehicle could then injure others.

This is a great point. What if they had shot him and he hit the accelerator and the car veered towards others? Clearly putting bystanders in danger....I hope those cops get what they deserve but they probably won't.....
 

DaveXA

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From what some of reporting, firing into the vehicle is against that department's policy. Supposedly it states that officers are not to fire into a moving vehicle. And it makes sense to say this as that vehicle could then injure others.
That's a great point. Didn't really think about that aspect.
 

DaveXA

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Commentary I heard asked the question about why if there was an imminent threat, only three of 7 officers fire?
Indeed, I would think only the ones with a clear line of fire would be taking shots, but idk what's going through their heads or what normal protocol calls for. But the shooting into the car is problematic for a whole host of reasons, not the least which would be if there's another passenger in the car.
 

xpuma20x

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From what I can gather with that chart, this is base salaries. While both professions put in a ton of extra hours beyond what would be considered the normal weekly, one of them gets paid OT and paid really well for their extra side gigs, while the other doesn't. I'm sure this is not reflected in the salary comparisons.
 

bigdaddysaints

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Different place, but didn't that happen
From what I can gather with that chart, this is base salaries. While both professions put in a ton of extra hours beyond what would be considered the normal weekly, one of them gets paid OT and paid really well for their extra side gigs, while the other doesn't. I'm sure this is not reflected in the salary comparisons.
My daughter has a friend that her dad is a BR cop. their house is at least 350K and him and his wife both have 50k vehicles, boat, 4 wheelers, the daughter has expensive tastes. now the wife works, but she's just an admin.
I have no doubt he's pulling more money doing details than he does while on duty. he works for it, it's not unearned by any means.
they should factor that in while calculating police income.
 

Optimus Prime

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article on this

sickening
==================
......York was suspended without pay for 50 hours for the dragging and for improperly deactivating his body camera. York told investigators the device was beeping loudly and his “mind was on other things.”

Hollingsworth, in a separate recording obtained by AP, can be heard telling a colleague at the office that “he beat the ever-living f--- out of” Greene........

 
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Optimus Prime

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Good article
===========

If you spend your nights lying awake wondering what it will take to change policing in America, you’re not getting much sleep these days.


The viral videos — one after another — are overwhelming and exhausting, and each new one seems to expose different issues and challenges.


In one, a cop pepper-sprays an Army second lieutenant as he sits in his vehicle after being pulled over. Another video shows officers wrestling to the ground and handcuffing a 73-year-old woman with dementia who had allegedly taken items worth about $14 from a store.

And one year ago next week will be the anniversary of a searing video of George Floyd dying under the knee of former police officer Derek Chauvin.


As a police reformer, I find myself caught between good cops who feel misunderstood and activists who want to defund police departments, or at least reimagine what policing looks like.

I see a flurry of legislative proposals at the local, state and federal levels, but most of them scratch only the surface of what is truly needed.


So what can be done? How do we change not just the operations but also the culture of policing? And how can we generate the sense of urgency that this issue deserves in all 18,000 police agencies in the United States?


The key to answering these questions may lie in the very technology that brought these issues front and center in the first place: video............

 

FullMonte

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Good article
===========

If you spend your nights lying awake wondering what it will take to change policing in America, you’re not getting much sleep these days.


The viral videos — one after another — are overwhelming and exhausting, and each new one seems to expose different issues and challenges.


In one, a cop pepper-sprays an Army second lieutenant as he sits in his vehicle after being pulled over. Another video shows officers wrestling to the ground and handcuffing a 73-year-old woman with dementia who had allegedly taken items worth about $14 from a store.

And one year ago next week will be the anniversary of a searing video of George Floyd dying under the knee of former police officer Derek Chauvin.


As a police reformer, I find myself caught between good cops who feel misunderstood and activists who want to defund police departments, or at least reimagine what policing looks like.

I see a flurry of legislative proposals at the local, state and federal levels, but most of them scratch only the surface of what is truly needed.


So what can be done? How do we change not just the operations but also the culture of policing? And how can we generate the sense of urgency that this issue deserves in all 18,000 police agencies in the United States?


The key to answering these questions may lie in the very technology that brought these issues front and center in the first place: video............


Just for clarification. The officers wrestled to the ground and handcuffed a 73-year old woman with dementia who was caught by the store with items worth about $14, which the store confiscated from her before she left. So, she didn't actually take any items from the store.
 

DaveXA

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Just for clarification. The officers wrestled to the ground and handcuffed a 73-year old woman with dementia who was caught by the store with items worth about $14, which the store confiscated from her before she left. So, she didn't actually take any items from the ststore.
That whole mess could have been avoided had the Walmart employees not been idiots to begin with. Who the heck calls the cops in that situation? She actually tried to tell them she forgot to pay and wanted to go back in and pay for the items. I've done that a few times and never had an issue. That whole episode was forked up from beginning to end.
 

FullMonte

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That whole mess could have been avoided had the Walmart employees not been idiots to begin with. Who the heck calls the cops in that situation? She actually tried to tell them she forgot to pay and wanted to go back in and pay for the items. I've done that a few times and never had an issue. That whole episode was forked up from beginning to end.
I'm wondering if that is some kind of WalMart policy. I know of someone who was arrested for theft at a WalMart. He said that he was with his expectant wife and they were using the self-checkout. His wife became ill and went to the restroom, and he finished checking out. When she came out, they started to leave, and were told that they had stolen the items in the bottom of their cart. He explained what happened and said he'd go pay for them, and they told him no, and called the cops.
 

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