Police Shootings / Possible Abuse Threads [merged] (6 Viewers)

Big_L

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Here's my take on the whole thing...

Over the past several years, we've seen numerous instances of people of color being mistreated by police officers that were recorded by witnesses. As those stories came out, the officers involved were disciplined, suspended, fired, and criminally charged.

Why is it that we can't find any reports of officers who mistreated people of color who were disciplined, fired, suspended, or criminally charged when the incidents were not publicly reported on? If they system isn't biased against people of color, why hasn't the system taken action against officers who ARE biased against people of color?
The system of policing will discipline or fire people of color who don't go along with "the program". There are plenty of examples of that. After being in LE as long as I was, I was so tired of the double standard that black officers had to endure over our white counter parts. All it takes is one chief or deputy chief to be this way and magically all of the white officers fall in line. Guys that you have backed up on calls and kept out of trouble turn on you. It's a phenomenon in it's own right.
 

tomwaits

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Generally, the radicalization that leads people to bomb abortion clinics or have a armed standoff with the federal government over land use or take seige to the nation's capital are not the same people concerned with police brutality.
Yeah, there aren't any radicals trying to burn down police stations or anything like that.

:rolleyes:
 
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JBE signs into law lots of changes for La. It seems like significant changes to the no knock and police camera laws.


Proposed law provides that no law enforcement officer shall seek, execute, or participate in the execution of a no-knock search warrant, except in cases where both of the following apply:
(1) The affidavit supporting the request for the warrant establishes probable cause that exigent circumstances exist requiring the warrant to be executed in a no-knock manner. Exigent circumstances include circumstances where the surprise of a no-knock entry is necessary to protect life and limb of the law enforcement officers and the occupants.

(2) The copy of the warrant being executed that is in the possession of law enforcement officers to be delivered includes the judge's signature.
 

Optimus Prime

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............In the national conversation about policing over the past year, public attention has focused on those who die at the hands of officers. Americans know the names of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tamir Rice and others killed by cops. Few know that tens of thousands of people like Paulino end up in emergency rooms after run-ins with police.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that since 2015, more than 400,000 people have been treated in emergency rooms because of a violent interaction with police or security guards. But there's almost no nationwide data on the nature or circumstances of their injuries.Many of the country's roughly 18,000 law enforcement agencies don't tally or make public the number of people who need medical care after officers break their arms, bruise their faces, or shock them with Tasers.

Researchers point out that only a tiny portion of arrests involve force. But when police do use force, more than half of the incidents ended with a suspect or civilian getting hurt, according to a 2020 analysis. It's unclear how serious the harm is. "We need better data on injury severity," said Matthew Hickman, a professor at Seattle University and one of the study's authors.

Most experts agree that injuries at the hands of cops remain underreported.

"This data depends on the discretion of police, who get to decide who is worthy or unworthy of an ambulance," said Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, an associate professor of sociology at Brown University who has researched the Chicago Police Department. "It is absolutely an undercount."

But even as the rate of injuries goes unacknowledged in the national conversation about police reform, it has strained the relationship between officers and the people they aim to serve — particularly in Black and brown neighborhoods.

"There is a withering away of community trust," said Van Cleve. "The police are not seen as enforcing the law, they are seen as outside the law."...........


 
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guidomerkinsrules

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............In the national conversation about policing over the past year, public attention has focused on those who die at the hands of officers. Americans know the names of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tamir Rice and others killed by cops. Few know that tens of thousands of people like Paulino end up in emergency rooms after run-ins with police.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that since 2015, more than 400,000 people have been treated in emergency rooms because of a violent interaction with police or security guards. But there's almost no nationwide data on the nature or circumstances of their injuries.Many of the country's roughly 18,000 law enforcement agencies don't tally or make public the number of people who need medical care after officers break their arms, bruise their faces, or shock them with Tasers.

Researchers point out that only a tiny portion of arrests involve force. But when police do use force, more than half of the incidents ended with a suspect or civilian getting hurt, according to a 2020 analysis. It's unclear how serious the harm is. "We need better data on injury severity," said Matthew Hickman, a professor at Seattle University and one of the study's authors.

Most experts agree that injuries at the hands of cops remain underreported.

"This data depends on the discretion of police, who get to decide who is worthy or unworthy of an ambulance," said Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve, an associate professor of sociology at Brown University who has researched the Chicago Police Department. "It is absolutely an undercount."

But even as the rate of injuries goes unacknowledged in the national conversation about police reform, it has strained the relationship between officers and the people they aim to serve — particularly in Black and brown neighborhoods.

"There is a withering away of community trust," said Van Cleve. "The police are not seen as enforcing the law, they are seen as outside the law."...........


Yes and this is why I’ve been asking if the deaths, et al are a tip-off the iceberg problem as history and current data would leave us to believe
 

bigdaddysaints

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JBE signs into law lots of changes for La. It seems like significant changes to the no knock and police camera laws.

(1) The affidavit supporting the request for the warrant establishes probable cause that exigent circumstances exist requiring the warrant to be executed in a no-knock manner. Exigent circumstances include circumstances where the surprise of a no-knock entry is necessary to protect life and limb of the law enforcement officers and the occupants.
So Basically, the first exception is pretty much an open invitation, so not much will change...
 
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So Basically, the first exception is pretty much an open invitation, so not much will change...
IDK how the prior law was written or even how to interpret it correctly. I'll leave that to the legal experts, but it seems to exclude drug raids as valid reasons. Only time will tell how judges interpret the reason to protect lives and if that will prevent abuse of the warrant process.
 

Maxp

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Unless there is a clear hostage situation, no knock raids should not be used.
Pretty much how I see it. Whatever happened to property rights? Government agents violating private property was one of the main reasons for the Revolutionary war.
 

Optimus Prime

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MONROE, La. (AP) — More than a year and a half after Louisiana state troopers were captured on body camera video brutalizing Black motorist Ronald Greene during his fatal arrest, police brass were still trying to blame his death on a car crash at the end of a high-speed chase.

Police officials quietly commissioned a study late last year into the role the crash could have played in Greene’s 2019 death, part of a behind-the-scenes bid to reduce the agency’s legal liability, according to internal documents obtained by The Associated Press.

The effort came despite the footage showing troopers stunning, punching and dragging the unarmed man — and one trooper’s admission that he bashed him in the head with a flashlight, a use of deadly force not previously reported.

The documents, which also detail how four troopers grossly exaggerated Greene’s threat to justify their uses of force, provide the fullest account yet of the deadly May 10, 2019, arrest. And they show the extent to which top brass and troopers alike sought to cover up or explain away actions in a case that is now the focus of a federal civil rights investigation…….


 

guidomerkinsrules

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Criminal justice professor Stinson said the #MeToo movement that has shaken other industries in recent years has not hit law enforcement because of a heavily ingrained police subculture.

"The culture of policing overrides a lot of this, and it's going to be very, very difficult to make meaningful reform," Sinson said. "It's a closed-door society, it's an us-versus-them mentality. There's a blue wall of silence in many places."

"Sexual misconduct is such a normalized part of the police subculture in many places across the country," he added. "It's just business as usual."


@tomwaits is it ok to try to address both the sexism/misogyny and police reform or nah?
:unsure:
 

Grandadmiral

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Big_L

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This is tragic...

This is why the "good guy with a gun" premise is so wrong when it comes to mass shootings. The responding police officers don't know who is who and when adrenaline takes over, common sense goes out the window.
 

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