Police Shootings / Possible Abuse Threads [merged] (26 Viewers)

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This is why the "good guy with a gun" premise is so wrong when it comes to mass shootings. The responding police officers don't know who is who and when adrenaline takes over, common sense goes out the window.
Agreed, but the guy didn't do himself any favors by picking up the assault weapon. IDK how it all went down, but if I'm there, once hear the sirens and know the cops are close, I'm dropping all weapons and getting my hands in clear view then following all commands as best as possible.

Too much Hollywood thinking that the cops will magically know who was the good guy and bad guy.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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Agreed, but the guy didn't do himself any favors by picking up the assault weapon. IDK how it all went down, but if I'm there, once hear the sirens and know the cops are close, I'm dropping all weapons and getting my hands in clear view then following all commands as best as possible.

Too much Hollywood thinking that the cops will magically know who was the good guy and bad guy.
Seems you’re holding him to a higher standard than the trained officer
 
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Seems you’re holding him to a higher standard than the trained officer
Not at all. The officers actions should be investigated and if they were in error addressed.

I'm just saying that a man walking around an active shooting area where officers were shot needs to understand he looks like a threat carrying a weapon. Reacting normal to the officer in movement speed etc. can easily be interpreted as a threat. It should probably be taught in conceal carry classes.

That same man without a weapon with empty hands raised in full view, not so much a threat.
 

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Not at all. The officers actions should be investigated and if they were in error addressed.

I'm just saying that a man walking around an active shooting area where officers were shot needs to understand he looks like a threat carrying a weapon. Reacting normal to the officer in movement speed etc. can easily be interpreted as a threat. It should probably be taught in conceal carry classes.

That same man without a weapon with empty hands raised in full view, not so much a threat.
I understand one hundred percent what you are saying. The only issue is the guy was shot for simply holding a weapon. Granted, the ongoing, unfolding event. However, simply holding a weapon is not grounds for being shot, unless he was pointing it. I don't know if commands were given or what, but this surely doesn't go well for the "armed good citizen" lifespan.
 

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Angela D. Alsobrooks, the leader of one of the most powerful majority-Black communities in the country, has said that amid this national racial justice reckoning, she wants her county to be a model for police reform.

She hired a new chief, assembled a police reform work group, invested in mental health and paid a historic settlement of $20 million to the family of a man killed by an officer in the Prince George’s County Police Department.

But behind the scenes, her administration has been vigorously fighting an attempt by some of its own officers to hold that same police department accountable in court — and in the process authorized the spending of at least $17.6 million of taxpayer money, according to invoices obtained through a records request and reviewed by The Washington Post.

For 2½ years, the county has defended the department and three White police leaders who are named in a federal lawsuit brought by a group of Black and Latino officers alleging systemic discrimination on the force. Racism against officers of color, their complaint argues, has ultimately harmed the county’s residents — more than 80 percent of whom are Black and Latino.

Now, as the cost to defend the department continues to mount with no indication of when litigation will end, lawmakers and residents are increasingly pressing Alsobrooks to settle. They’re frustrated, saying that the cost, including millions of dollars in legal fees paid to Venable LLP, the private D.C. law firm the county hired, contradicts promises of change and undermines the ability to pay for reform.

“I have problems with how much we are spending to defend something that doesn’t really seem defensible,” said county council member Jolene Ivey (D-District 5). “We are a Black county. How are we not doing more to stand up for Black officers, and Black people in general?”..........

 

Grandadmiral

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Angela D. Alsobrooks, the leader of one of the most powerful majority-Black communities in the country, has said that amid this national racial justice reckoning, she wants her county to be a model for police reform.

She hired a new chief, assembled a police reform work group, invested in mental health and paid a historic settlement of $20 million to the family of a man killed by an officer in the Prince George’s County Police Department.

But behind the scenes, her administration has been vigorously fighting an attempt by some of its own officers to hold that same police department accountable in court — and in the process authorized the spending of at least $17.6 million of taxpayer money, according to invoices obtained through a records request and reviewed by The Washington Post.

For 2½ years, the county has defended the department and three White police leaders who are named in a federal lawsuit brought by a group of Black and Latino officers alleging systemic discrimination on the force. Racism against officers of color, their complaint argues, has ultimately harmed the county’s residents — more than 80 percent of whom are Black and Latino.

Now, as the cost to defend the department continues to mount with no indication of when litigation will end, lawmakers and residents are increasingly pressing Alsobrooks to settle. They’re frustrated, saying that the cost, including millions of dollars in legal fees paid to Venable LLP, the private D.C. law firm the county hired, contradicts promises of change and undermines the ability to pay for reform.

“I have problems with how much we are spending to defend something that doesn’t really seem defensible,” said county council member Jolene Ivey (D-District 5). “We are a Black county. How are we not doing more to stand up for Black officers, and Black people in general?”..........

That's insane. The demographic data in the link says more about the problem than anything.
 
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I understand one hundred percent what you are saying. The only issue is the guy was shot for simply holding a weapon. Granted, the ongoing, unfolding event. However, simply holding a weapon is not grounds for being shot, unless he was pointing it. I don't know if commands were given or what, but this surely doesn't go well for the "armed good citizen" lifespan.
You are right. He had every right to hold a weapon. But it's it worth being dead right?

Situational awareness is as important in a city as it is in the wild. If you're not aware of that lion, you just might be lunch. If you're standing around a cop shooting holding an assault rifle, you just might be mistaken for the shooter especially since the officer has no idea the threat has ended. He sees a guy on the ground with no weapon because you're holding it. A split second decision had to be made and the assumption isn't going to be that you took out the threat when you make yourself appear to be the threat.
 

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You are right. He had every right to hold a weapon. But it's it worth being dead right?

Situational awareness is as important in a city as it is in the wild. If you're not aware of that lion, you just might be lunch. If you're standing around a cop shooting holding an assault rifle, you just might be mistaken for the shooter especially since the officer has no idea the threat has ended. He sees a guy on the ground with no weapon because you're holding it. A split second decision had to be made and the assumption isn't going to be that you took out the threat when you make yourself appear to be the threat.
Bad thought, but are we sure he picked it up? Who else saw this besides the cops?
 
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Bad thought, but are we sure he picked it up? Who else saw this besides the cops?
The linked article said it, but it remains to be seen if it'll be challenged. I get why folks would ask given the current status of policing in this nation.
 

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Wouldn't this have been a perfect time to use a taser?

Looks like maybe drugs or mental health situation

Not a 'bad shoot' but wonder if there was any other solution than killing the guy
========================================

A Maryland sheriff’s deputy who fired 12 shots at a man who attacked him with a tree branch will not be charged in the man’s death, Maryland prosecutors reported Monday.

Sgt. Frank Pruitt, according to prosecutors, took legal actions against Kevin Costlow, 52, the morning of Feb. 6 along a roadway in Montgomery County. The two had squared off after the deputy responded to a radio call about a motorist — Costlow — who had caused two crashes before getting out of his car and trying to attack people at the scene with what initially was reported to be a baseball bat, prosecutors said.

Video of the encounter taken by two bystanders showed the deputy — his gun drawn — backing away as Costlow walked forward, lifted the branch above his head and slammed it down several times on the deputy’s head and shoulder.

Ten of Pruitt’s rounds hit Costlow’s torso, according to a report prosecutors released that details the reasons Pruitt will not be charged.

“Although in some cases this could be viewed as excessive, based on the video evidence, it is clear Costlow did not stop advancing towards Pruitt until the last shot was fired,” prosecutors wrote. “Once Costlow collapsed to the ground, Pruitt no longer continued to shoot.”

Family members of Costlow, a retired information technology executive, have questioned why the encounter unfolded as it did.

“Kevin Costlow was a responsible and respected family man and business leader,” their attorney, Timothy Maloney, said in a statement. “He lived an exceptional life without any violence or criminality of any kind. This is what makes the tragic events of February 6 so inexplicable to his family.”

Prosecutors said they reached their conclusions based on the two civilian videos, statements from 13 witnesses at the scene and an interview with Pruitt.
The branch Costlow used — 2 or 3 inches thick and 4 to 5 feet long — had apparently been pulled from his car. According to one of the videos, recorded 10 feet from the fatal encounter, Costlow twice slammed the branch on Pruitt’s head and shoulder, causing the branch to snap in half.

Pruitt retreated and did not shoot.

As Costlow raised the branch a third time and slammed it down toward Pruitt, the deputy began shooting. By the third gunshot, according to the video, the branch had fallen out of Costlow’s hand. But with Costlow continuing to advance, prosecutors concluded, the deputy reasonably viewed him as a continuing threat — particularly if he obtained Pruitt’s service weapon...........

 

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Wouldn't this have been a perfect time to use a taser?

Looks like maybe drugs or mental health situation

Not a 'bad shoot' but wonder if there was any other solution than killing the guy
========================================

A Maryland sheriff’s deputy who fired 12 shots at a man who attacked him with a tree branch will not be charged in the man’s death, Maryland prosecutors reported Monday.

Sgt. Frank Pruitt, according to prosecutors, took legal actions against Kevin Costlow, 52, the morning of Feb. 6 along a roadway in Montgomery County. The two had squared off after the deputy responded to a radio call about a motorist — Costlow — who had caused two crashes before getting out of his car and trying to attack people at the scene with what initially was reported to be a baseball bat, prosecutors said.

Video of the encounter taken by two bystanders showed the deputy — his gun drawn — backing away as Costlow walked forward, lifted the branch above his head and slammed it down several times on the deputy’s head and shoulder.

Ten of Pruitt’s rounds hit Costlow’s torso, according to a report prosecutors released that details the reasons Pruitt will not be charged.

“Although in some cases this could be viewed as excessive, based on the video evidence, it is clear Costlow did not stop advancing towards Pruitt until the last shot was fired,” prosecutors wrote. “Once Costlow collapsed to the ground, Pruitt no longer continued to shoot.”

Family members of Costlow, a retired information technology executive, have questioned why the encounter unfolded as it did.

“Kevin Costlow was a responsible and respected family man and business leader,” their attorney, Timothy Maloney, said in a statement. “He lived an exceptional life without any violence or criminality of any kind. This is what makes the tragic events of February 6 so inexplicable to his family.”

Prosecutors said they reached their conclusions based on the two civilian videos, statements from 13 witnesses at the scene and an interview with Pruitt.
The branch Costlow used — 2 or 3 inches thick and 4 to 5 feet long — had apparently been pulled from his car. According to one of the videos, recorded 10 feet from the fatal encounter, Costlow twice slammed the branch on Pruitt’s head and shoulder, causing the branch to snap in half.

Pruitt retreated and did not shoot.

As Costlow raised the branch a third time and slammed it down toward Pruitt, the deputy began shooting. By the third gunshot, according to the video, the branch had fallen out of Costlow’s hand. But with Costlow continuing to advance, prosecutors concluded, the deputy reasonably viewed him as a continuing threat — particularly if he obtained Pruitt’s service weapon...........


I don't really like playing "what if" because I don't have the whole story, but I do wonder if a taser would have worked. The guy must have been having a psychotic break or something since it seems he didn't have any prior history like that.
 

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Wouldn't this have been a perfect time to use a taser?

Looks like maybe drugs or mental health situation

Not a 'bad shoot' but wonder if there was any other solution than killing the guy
========================================

A Maryland sheriff’s deputy who fired 12 shots at a man who attacked him with a tree branch will not be charged in the man’s death, Maryland prosecutors reported Monday.

Sgt. Frank Pruitt, according to prosecutors, took legal actions against Kevin Costlow, 52, the morning of Feb. 6 along a roadway in Montgomery County. The two had squared off after the deputy responded to a radio call about a motorist — Costlow — who had caused two crashes before getting out of his car and trying to attack people at the scene with what initially was reported to be a baseball bat, prosecutors said.

Video of the encounter taken by two bystanders showed the deputy — his gun drawn — backing away as Costlow walked forward, lifted the branch above his head and slammed it down several times on the deputy’s head and shoulder.

Ten of Pruitt’s rounds hit Costlow’s torso, according to a report prosecutors released that details the reasons Pruitt will not be charged.

“Although in some cases this could be viewed as excessive, based on the video evidence, it is clear Costlow did not stop advancing towards Pruitt until the last shot was fired,” prosecutors wrote. “Once Costlow collapsed to the ground, Pruitt no longer continued to shoot.”

Family members of Costlow, a retired information technology executive, have questioned why the encounter unfolded as it did.

“Kevin Costlow was a responsible and respected family man and business leader,” their attorney, Timothy Maloney, said in a statement. “He lived an exceptional life without any violence or criminality of any kind. This is what makes the tragic events of February 6 so inexplicable to his family.”

Prosecutors said they reached their conclusions based on the two civilian videos, statements from 13 witnesses at the scene and an interview with Pruitt.
The branch Costlow used — 2 or 3 inches thick and 4 to 5 feet long — had apparently been pulled from his car. According to one of the videos, recorded 10 feet from the fatal encounter, Costlow twice slammed the branch on Pruitt’s head and shoulder, causing the branch to snap in half.

Pruitt retreated and did not shoot.

As Costlow raised the branch a third time and slammed it down toward Pruitt, the deputy began shooting. By the third gunshot, according to the video, the branch had fallen out of Costlow’s hand. But with Costlow continuing to advance, prosecutors concluded, the deputy reasonably viewed him as a continuing threat — particularly if he obtained Pruitt’s service weapon...........


Article said he tried to use his taser, but it didn't work correctly. The guy was having a psychotic break down. It's a shame he died instead of getting help. Yea maybe the cop did everything he could to "prevent" shooting the guy, but the fact that he had a gun drawn on him is the reason he had to shoot him. I don't think this was a clear case of police with bad intent, but it is a clear case of police are not always the solution. Police should have been there to set a perimeter and more qualified professionals should have been there to deal with the guy. But that's a perfect world with unlimited resources solution. We are far from that.
 

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