Report: Brett Favre's Vikings had a bounty program too {non tos language in link} (1 Viewer)

Saintaholic

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After watching the tape, they were convinced that Nick Barnett, Green Bay&#8217;s outstanding linebacker, had gone out of his way to injure Adrian Peterson, the Vikings halfback.

The rival franchises played again nine weeks later, and three days before kickoff a Minnesota coach stood up in a team meeting, mentioned Barnett by name, and said, &#8220;I will give $500 to anyone who takes this **********er out of the game.&#8221;

This was hardly a shocking move in the Vikings&#8217; locker room, where piles of money were regularly collected&#8212;then distributed as rewards&#8212;for injuring opposing stars. &#8220;It was part of the culture,&#8221; said Artis Hicks, a Minnesota offensive lineman. &#8220;I had coaches start a pot and all the veterans put in an extra $100, $200, and if you hurt someone special, you get the money. There was a bottom line, and I think we all bought in: you&#8217;re there to win, and if taking out the other team&#8217;s best player helps you win, hey, it&#8217;s nothing personal. Just business.&#8221;
Brett Favre&#39;s Vikings Had A "Bounty" Program Too
 

SoggyBottomBoy

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From the Giants to the media after the NFCCG:

After the game, Giants rookie linebacker Jacquian Williams said, "the thing is, we knew he had four concussions so that was our biggest thing, to take him out of the game." Devin Thomas, who recovered Williams' miscues, echoed that theme.

"He's had a lot of concussions," Thomas said. "We were just like, 'we've got to put a hit on that guy.'"
The NFL's Greg Aiello's response:

When questions were raised about the Giants' apparent strategy, Big Blue backpedaled a bit, insisting no one targeted an opponent or deliberately sought to injure anyone. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello e-mailed The New York Times that distinction was sufficient.

"Players are held accountable for their actions on the field," Aiello wrote. "There were no illegal hits to the head or neck area against Kyle Williams on Sunday. There was no conduct by the Giants of any kind that would suggest an effort to injury Kyle Williams in any way."
I expect a similar response. We will never be vindicated for the injustice done to this team. There will never be a league response as ridiculously extreme as the Bounty Farce, ever again.

Edit: The link to the source: http://www.nola.com/saints/index.ssf/2012/05/new_york_giants_jets_have_flir.html
 

Doug B

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All teams have always done it in some form (straight cash, picking up dinner/bar tabs, etc.). And guess what? All teams still do it today, in 2016.
 

superchuck500

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On first and 10 from the Saints 47, Chester Taylor took a handoff and rumbled 14 yards to the Saints 33. New Orleans called its final time-out, and along the sideline Ryan Longwell, one of the league’s best kickers, was preparing to hit the field goal that would take the Vikings to their first Super Bowl since 1977. There was now 1:06 left, and two runs—one by Taylor, one by Peterson—gained nothing. Minnesota called its second time-out with 19 seconds left, and it was third and 10 from the Saints 33. Longwell peeked at the field between kicks into a net. From here, the field goal would be 50 yards—not out of question, but a bit long for his range.

Then, stupidity. On the sideline Eric Bieniemy, the running backs coach, could be seen wildly waving his arms, trying to get someone—anyone—off the field. Minnesota accidentally had 12 offensive players in the huddle, which resulted in a 5-yard penalty that pushed the team back to the 38. The Vikings’ two requirements were clear: move a bit closer to give Longwell his best possible shot, and don’t—under any circumstance—turn over the football.

The play call was unremarkable: A short throw to Berrian in the flat. Favre lined up behind center. Peterson stood 5 yards to his rear, Berrian jogged in motion, right to left, then back toward the right. Sidney Rice was lined up in the right slot, tight end Visanthe Shiancoe in the left slot. It was a collection of Minnesota’s best weapons on the field for the season’s most important play. The stadium noise was deafening. Seats vibrated from the decibels. Favre dropped back and rolled to the right. Berrian was never alone, but Shiancoe immediately turned around at the 35, where he was wide open. Favre either didn’t see him or didn’t feel comfortable with the throw. He did, however, spot Rice crisscrossing the middle of the field near the New Orleans 23. With his body moving hard to the right, Favre reared back and fired to Rice, who was running leftward. The first person to see the pass was Tracy Porter, the speedy Saints cornerback. As the ball came closer and closer, Porter stepped in front of a lunging Rice, caught the football, and returned it to the Saints 47. “I did happen to read his eyes,” Porter said. “He was looking at Rice the whole time.” Favre dropped his head in disgust. There were seven seconds remaining.
:a_smil09:
 

superchuck500

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ThomasJonesNFLRB said:
You’ve seen Braveheart? Braveheart is exactly what football is. The scene where the Irish and the English are all running toward each other, and they clash, and it’s all individual little ******* battles.


Uh . . . Irish? smh
 

bclemms

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It's sickening. Pretty sure we lost out on Jamie Collins because of the bounty BS. In the end he would have probably been forced to play as a DE or 34 OLB then benched and released but still.
 

fdl16

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Well well well. Why is this not on the front page of PFT?
 

VPCajun

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El Caliente

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Uh . . . Irish? smh
:hihi:

He is a former football player turned actor, not a freaking Hollywood script writer. Though the exaggerations that took place in the movie, it might as well have been the Irish.:hihi:

I love how this article spends like 5 paragraphs talking about the Vikings bounty program (which a players admits to), and then the final 13 is spent on
the Saints bounty program (which no player admits to).
 

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