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I'd read about this before but didn't get such good detail. I do have this condition and learning this has caused an epiphany. I never knew that the minds eye was actually supposed to produce images. All I've ever seen was darkness with a vague knowledge of what I should be imagining based on descriptions.

 

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I'd read about this before but didn't get such good detail. I do have this condition and learning this has caused an epiphany. I never knew that the minds eye was actually supposed to produce images. All I've ever seen was darkness with a vague knowledge of what I should be imagining based on descriptions.

I do this when I'm doing math in my head sometimes if it's several digits. Like 278 + 153. I'll picture them in my head so I can keep track of things like carried numbers and what not.
 

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I'd read about this before but didn't get such good detail. I do have this condition and learning this has caused an epiphany. I never knew that the minds eye was actually supposed to produce images. All I've ever seen was darkness with a vague knowledge of what I should be imagining based on descriptions.

Never heard of this. I'm the opposite of you. I see things as images. Just this weekend we went to a camp near Nachitoches for the first time. My wife asked me if I need the printed directions or Siri. I told her I think I can get there because I studied the map. I'm not good at remembering all of the road names, but can picture the turns and road changes.

Same with the NY subway maps. I know the routes better by their color than their number.

I'm also a graphic designer/illustrator, which makes sense. Not to this extreme degree, but I can relate to Temple Grandin in how I see things. Really good movie, BTW:

 

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Twenty-one years ago, researchers announced the first “draft” of sequencing the complete human genome. It was a monumental achievement, but the sequence was still missing about 8 percent of the genome. Now, scientists working together around the world say they’ve finally filled in that reclusive 8 percent.

If their work holds up to peer review and it turns out they really did sequence and assemble the human genome in its entirety, gaps and all, it could change the future of medicine.

Sequencing the human genome has long been a huge project with worthy goals. Why? Because as humans understand their genetic code better, they can make better, more customized medicines, for example—including the kind of gene-focused medicine that powered the first effective COVID-19 vaccines...........

 

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NASA is finally going to Venus. And the missions—two missions, actually—could shine a light on a planet that, despite being Earth’s closest neighbor, has been cloaked in clouds and mystery for a generation.

The space agency on Wednesday announced not one but two missions to Venus, the second planet from the Sun and, at no more than 150 million miles distant, the closest planet to Earth. Mars, the fourth rock from the sun, is 212 million miles from Earth at its closest.

“We know a lot about Mars and even Jupiter and Saturn,” John Logsdon, a former NASA adviser and ex-director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, told The Daily Beast. “Venus is our nearest neighbor and is largely unexplored.”

NASA last went to Venus in 1990. That’s when the Magellan probe arrived over Mars for a four-year stay loosely mapping the volcanic planet. Spacecraft from foreign space agencies have visited since then—the European Space Agency sent a probe in 2006; the Japanese space agency visited in 2010—but NASA, despite its much greater resources, has sat it out, instead preferring to spend its time and money on missions to the moon and Mars.

But Venus is special. It’s not as close by, and it’s ripe for mining, as the moon is. It’s not as benign as Mars is, meaning it’s less welcoming to human explorers. But its poisonous sulfuric clouds and potentially volcanic surface could harbor important secrets that, if and when we crack them, could tell us as much about Earth as Venus............

 

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Using new data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, researchers believe they have solved a longstanding mystery of solar system science: the length of a day on Saturn. It's 10 hours, 33 minutes and 38 seconds.

The figure has eluded planetary scientists for decades, because the gas giant has no solid surface with landmarks to track as it rotates, and it has an unusual magnetic field that hides the planet's rotation rate.

The answer, it turned out, was hidden in the rings.......

 

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I'd read about this before but didn't get such good detail. I do have this condition and learning this has caused an epiphany. I never knew that the minds eye was actually supposed to produce images. All I've ever seen was darkness with a vague knowledge of what I should be imagining based on descriptions.

Not able to watch it. Is it about aphantasia?

I don't see images except in dreams.

I'd love to find out if psilocybin would help but the penalty is too steep if I were to be caught with it.
 
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Not able to watch it. Is it about aphantasia?

I don't see images except in dreams.
Guess
I'd love to find out if psilocybin would help but the penalty is too steep if I were to be caught with it.
Yes it is about aphantasia. It just goes into some studies and impacts of the differences as well as areas of the brain where damage can cause it. All in all tho, the science of it is still very new so there's much left to understand.
 

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Coxcatlan Cave in Mexico's Tehuacan Valley is a time capsule like no other. Its dusty floor is a history book, its pages detailing thousands of years of food and technology of the land's inhabitants.

Archaeologists from the US and Mexico have finally dug into its earliest chapter, using advanced dating techniques to determine the age of animal bones buried among the rock shelter's oldest layers.

The results were astonishing, hinting at a human presence in the area as far back as 33,000 years ago – thousands of years before ice sheets stretched to their peak, and around 20,000 years earlier than currently accepted evidence suggests.

It'll take more than a few odd radiocarbon measurements to demand a complete rethink, of course. But the results of this recent study led by Iowa State University archaeologist Andrew Somerville are bound to fuel the ongoing debate over the timeline of human migration into the heart of the Americas..........

 
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bonnjer

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Optimus Prime

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China’s“artificial sun” tokamak has sustained a plasma reaction for a whopping 101 seconds at 120 million degrees Celsius, setting new records in the field of nuclear fusion. The breakthrough could pave the way for a carbon-neutral energy future.

EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), or HT-7U, is a custom-built fusion reactor that has operated in different phases since 2006. Like many of the world’s tokamak experiments, EAST has reached fusion before. As a refresher, inside the donut-shaped (or, sometimes, more spherical) containment of a tokamak, sun-hot plasma swirls in a circle that’s held in place by supercooled electromagnets.

This magnetic field is the only thing floating between 360-million-degree plasma and a bunch of human-made materials that obviously can’t sustain that temperature. The plasma results from smashing different nuclei together, fusing them rather than splitting them.

This requires a huge energy investment, which critics say means fusion will never really get off the ground. And so far, all tokamaks work for just a scant few seconds at lower temperatures before something goes wrong.

This is why EAST—which just properly “turned on” last December—running for 101 seconds at 120 million Celsius is such a huge deal. It’s a double whammy: a very long runtime at an extraordinarily high temperature. In 2018, the tokamak reached 180 million degrees Fahrenheit, or about 82 million degrees Celsius. But back then, EAST could only sustain the plasma for around 10 seconds................

 

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Our universe is unimaginably big. Hundreds of billions, if not trillions, of galaxies spin through space, each containing billions or trillions of stars. Some researchers studying models of the universe speculate that the universe's diameter could be 7 billion light-years across. Others think it could be infinite.

But is it all that's out there? Science fiction loves the idea of a parallel universe, and the thought that we might be living just one of an infinite number of possible lives. Multiverses aren't reserved for "Star Trek," "Spiderman" and "Doctor Who," though. Real scientific theory explores, and in some cases supports, the case for universes outside, parallel to, or distant from but mirroring our own.

Multiverses and parallel worlds are often argued in the context of other major scientific concepts like the Big Bang, string theory and quantum mechanics.

Around 13.7 billion years ago, everything we know of was an infinitesimal singularity. Then, according to the Big Bang theory, it burst into action, inflating faster than the speed of light in all directions for a tiny fraction of a second. Before 10^-32 seconds had passed, the universe had exploded outward to 10^26 times its original size in a process called cosmic inflation.

And that's all before the actual expansion of matter that we usually think of as the Big Bang itself, which was a consequence of all this inflation: As the inflation slowed, a flood of matter and radiation appeared, creating the classic Big Bang fireball, and began to form the atoms, molecules, stars and galaxies that populate the vastness of space that surrounds us.

That mysterious process of inflation and the Big Bang have convinced some researchers that multiple universes are possible, or even very likely. According to theoretical physicist Alexander Vilenkin of Tufts University in Massachusetts, inflation didn't end everywhere at the same time. While it ended for everything that we can detect from Earth 13.8 billion years ago, cosmic inflation in fact continues in other places. This is called the theory of eternal inflation. And as inflation ends in a particular place, a new bubble universe forms, Vilenkin wrote for Scientific American in 2011.

Those bubble universes can't contact each other because they continue to expand indefinitely. If we were to set off for the edge of our bubble, where it might butt up against the next bubble universe over, we'd never reach it because the edge is zipping away from us faster than the speed of light, and faster than we could ever travel................

 

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Our universe is unimaginably big. Hundreds of billions, if not trillions, of galaxies spin through space, each containing billions or trillions of stars. Some researchers studying models of the universe speculate that the universe's diameter could be 7 billion light-years across. Others think it could be infinite.

But is it all that's out there? Science fiction loves the idea of a parallel universe, and the thought that we might be living just one of an infinite number of possible lives. Multiverses aren't reserved for "Star Trek," "Spiderman" and "Doctor Who," though. Real scientific theory explores, and in some cases supports, the case for universes outside, parallel to, or distant from but mirroring our own.

Multiverses and parallel worlds are often argued in the context of other major scientific concepts like the Big Bang, string theory and quantum mechanics.

Around 13.7 billion years ago, everything we know of was an infinitesimal singularity. Then, according to the Big Bang theory, it burst into action, inflating faster than the speed of light in all directions for a tiny fraction of a second. Before 10^-32 seconds had passed, the universe had exploded outward to 10^26 times its original size in a process called cosmic inflation.

And that's all before the actual expansion of matter that we usually think of as the Big Bang itself, which was a consequence of all this inflation: As the inflation slowed, a flood of matter and radiation appeared, creating the classic Big Bang fireball, and began to form the atoms, molecules, stars and galaxies that populate the vastness of space that surrounds us.

That mysterious process of inflation and the Big Bang have convinced some researchers that multiple universes are possible, or even very likely. According to theoretical physicist Alexander Vilenkin of Tufts University in Massachusetts, inflation didn't end everywhere at the same time. While it ended for everything that we can detect from Earth 13.8 billion years ago, cosmic inflation in fact continues in other places. This is called the theory of eternal inflation. And as inflation ends in a particular place, a new bubble universe forms, Vilenkin wrote for Scientific American in 2011.

Those bubble universes can't contact each other because they continue to expand indefinitely. If we were to set off for the edge of our bubble, where it might butt up against the next bubble universe over, we'd never reach it because the edge is zipping away from us faster than the speed of light, and faster than we could ever travel................

So there are countless DR threads about Skynard and heaven metal throughout the multiverse...
 
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I might be the only one, but it's a bit suspect that the only seed fossil was destroyed in a freak accident. I mean, that's exactly what a carnivorous plant would destroy if it was targeting humans as a food source.

 
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