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While the membrane is primarily designed for use in wastewater treatment plants or for drinking water treatment, it could also be used in air filtration systems or even in masks. Since it consists exclusively of ecologically sound materials, it could simply be composted after use—and its production requires minimum energy.
 

Optimus Prime

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So all those 80s commercials were bull shirt?
=========================

How many of us were told as children to drink our milk because it would give us strong bones?

The idea does make some sense. Milk contains calcium. Calcium is known to improve bone mineral density.

But demonstrating a definitive link between the consumption of milk and the possession of strong bones is harder than it sounds. The ideal study would take two large groups of people and randomly assign every member of one group to drink plenty of milk daily for several decades, while the other group would drink some kind of milk placebo instead. Obviously, this is too difficult to do in practice.

What we can do instead is to take many thousands of people, ask them how much milk they’ve been drinking over the years, and then follow them for at least a decade to see whether the people who regularly drink milk are any less likely to suffer from broken bones later in life.

This is what happened in research published in 1997 conducted by Harvard University. An impressive 77,000 female nurses were followed for 10 years. The researchers found no significant difference in the numbers of arm or hip fracturesbetween those who drank one glass of milk a week or less and those who drank two or more.

When the team did a similar study with 330,000 male health professionals, again milk didn’t seem to make a difference to fracture rates........




 

faceman

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So all those 80s commercials were bull shirt?
=========================

How many of us were told as children to drink our milk because it would give us strong bones?

The idea does make some sense. Milk contains calcium. Calcium is known to improve bone mineral density.

But demonstrating a definitive link between the consumption of milk and the possession of strong bones is harder than it sounds. The ideal study would take two large groups of people and randomly assign every member of one group to drink plenty of milk daily for several decades, while the other group would drink some kind of milk placebo instead. Obviously, this is too difficult to do in practice.

What we can do instead is to take many thousands of people, ask them how much milk they’ve been drinking over the years, and then follow them for at least a decade to see whether the people who regularly drink milk are any less likely to suffer from broken bones later in life.

This is what happened in research published in 1997 conducted by Harvard University. An impressive 77,000 female nurses were followed for 10 years. The researchers found no significant difference in the numbers of arm or hip fracturesbetween those who drank one glass of milk a week or less and those who drank two or more.

When the team did a similar study with 330,000 male health professionals, again milk didn’t seem to make a difference to fracture rates........
Milk may not make for strong bones,but it's still the best fluid we can drink for hydration. It's mostly water,but also contains healthy fats,protiens and sugars which slows the absorption rate down.

 

Optimus Prime

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very trippy stuff
===============

In upcoming research, scientists will attempt to show the universe has consciousness. Yes, really. No matter the outcome, we’ll soon learn more about what it means to be conscious—and which objects around us might have a mind of their own.

What will that mean for how we treat objects and the world around us? Buckle in, because things are about to get weird.

What Is Consciousness?​

The basic definition of consciousness intentionally leaves a lot of questions unanswered. It’s “the normal mental condition of the waking state of humans, characterized by the experience of perceptions, thoughts, feelings, awareness of the external world, and often in humans (but not necessarily in other animals) self-awareness,” according to the Oxford Dictionary of Psychology.

Scientists simply don’t have one unified theory of what consciousness is. We also don’t know where it comes from, or what it’s made of.

However, one loophole of this knowledge gap is that we can’t exhaustively say other organisms, and even inanimate objects, don’t have consciousness. Humans relate to animals and can imagine, say, dogs and cats have some amount of consciousness because we see their facial expressions and how they appear to make decisions. But just because we don’t “relate to” rocks, the ocean, or the night sky, that isn’t the same as proving those things don’t have consciousness.

This is where a philosophical stance called panpsychism comes into play, writes All About Space’s David Crookes:

“This claims consciousness is inherent in even the tiniest pieces of matter — an idea that suggests the fundamental building blocks of reality have conscious experience. Crucially, it implies consciousness could be found throughout the universe.”
It’s also where physics enters the picture. Some scientists have posited that the thing we think of as consciousness is made of micro-scale quantum physics events and other “spooky actions at a distance,” somehow fluttering inside our brains and generating conscious thoughts................

 

Optimus Prime

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Milk may not make for strong bones,but it's still the best fluid we can drink for hydration. It's mostly water,but also contains healthy fats,protiens and sugars which slows the absorption rate down.


Looks like the dairy industry may have dropped the ball by not having a Milk: Better than Gatorade campaign

But the last line gives me a little pause
==================

The study is funded by Dairy Farmers of Canada.

=============================

I'm sure the Gatorade funded Institute for Hydration Science has a study saying otherwise

Has an industry funded study ever found that the industry wasn't as good as advertised?
 

Optimus Prime

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Exoplanet discoveries used to be nothing but a dream for scientists, but new telescope technology and more advanced observation techniques have made the task of finding planets outside of our solar system easier than ever. In fact, so many new exoplanets are being found these days that scientists have to pick and choose which ones are most in need of study since there simply aren’t enough eyes to go around.

Now, a massive international team of astronomers and other scientists have revealed the discovery of a particularly interesting exoplanet that is sure to get a lot of attention. It’s called TOI-1231b, and it orbits a star much cooler than our own Sun. The star, named NLTT 24399, is a red dwarf, so despite TOI-1231b being much closer to its star than Earth is to the Sun, the planet is actually similar in temperature, and it is thought to have a robust atmosphere that warrants future study..........

 

Optimus Prime

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National Geographic announced this week that it is officially recognizing a fifth ocean: the Southern Ocean.

This body of water lies around the Antarctic, stretching from the coastline to the 60 degrees latitude mark.

All oceans are connected, so in a way, there is only one ocean. But the planet's waters have been traditionally split into four regions: the Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, and Indian oceans.

The change makes the Southern Ocean the second-smallest, only bigger than the Arctic ocean.............


 

faceman

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Looks like the dairy industry may have dropped the ball by not having a Milk: Better than Gatorade campaign

But the last line gives me a little pause
==================

The study is funded by Dairy Farmers of Canada.

=============================

I'm sure the Gatorade funded Institute for Hydration Science has a study saying otherwise

Has an industry funded study ever found that the industry wasn't as good as advertised?
I get where you're coming from. Ie, I'm very leery of environtmental impact studies funded by oil companies. The benefits of milk have also been shown by medical research

 
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But that’s just the beginning of engineering life’s superpowers. Until now, scientists have only been able to slip one designer amino acid into a living organism. The new work opens the door to hacking multiple existing codons at once, copyediting at least three synthetic amino acids at the same time. And when it’s 3 out of 20, that’s enough to fundamentally rewrite life as it exists on Earth.
 

SystemShock

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So all those 80s commercials were bull shirt?
=========================

How many of us were told as children to drink our milk because it would give us strong bones?

The idea does make some sense. Milk contains calcium. Calcium is known to improve bone mineral density.

But demonstrating a definitive link between the consumption of milk and the possession of strong bones is harder than it sounds. The ideal study would take two large groups of people and randomly assign every member of one group to drink plenty of milk daily for several decades, while the other group would drink some kind of milk placebo instead. Obviously, this is too difficult to do in practice.

What we can do instead is to take many thousands of people, ask them how much milk they’ve been drinking over the years, and then follow them for at least a decade to see whether the people who regularly drink milk are any less likely to suffer from broken bones later in life.

This is what happened in research published in 1997 conducted by Harvard University. An impressive 77,000 female nurses were followed for 10 years. The researchers found no significant difference in the numbers of arm or hip fracturesbetween those who drank one glass of milk a week or less and those who drank two or more.

When the team did a similar study with 330,000 male health professionals, again milk didn’t seem to make a difference to fracture rates........

Were they expecting people who didn't drink milk just to crack and crumble over a stiff wind?
You can have weak bones and never break them, just like you can have strong bones and break them, depending on activity.
 

faceman

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Were they expecting people who didn't drink milk just to crack and crumble over a stiff wind?
You can have weak bones and never break them, just like you can have strong bones and break them, depending on activity.
Strong bones do help though. Bears for example have bones that are 4 times more dense than Humans. It's the main reason A grizzly or polar bear would easily dispatch a lion or tiger in a fight. Felines have lightweight bones built for speed . It's natures way of allowing them to chase down prey over a short distance. One paw swipe from a Kodiak or Polar bear would easily break the spine of any feline. Yes, I'm a nerd who researches useless info like this :)
 

saintmdterps

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very trippy stuff
===============

In upcoming research, scientists will attempt to show the universe has consciousness. Yes, really. No matter the outcome, we’ll soon learn more about what it means to be conscious—and which objects around us might have a mind of their own.

What will that mean for how we treat objects and the world around us? Buckle in, because things are about to get weird.

What Is Consciousness?​

The basic definition of consciousness intentionally leaves a lot of questions unanswered. It’s “the normal mental condition of the waking state of humans, characterized by the experience of perceptions, thoughts, feelings, awareness of the external world, and often in humans (but not necessarily in other animals) self-awareness,” according to the Oxford Dictionary of Psychology.

Scientists simply don’t have one unified theory of what consciousness is. We also don’t know where it comes from, or what it’s made of.

However, one loophole of this knowledge gap is that we can’t exhaustively say other organisms, and even inanimate objects, don’t have consciousness. Humans relate to animals and can imagine, say, dogs and cats have some amount of consciousness because we see their facial expressions and how they appear to make decisions. But just because we don’t “relate to” rocks, the ocean, or the night sky, that isn’t the same as proving those things don’t have consciousness.

This is where a philosophical stance called panpsychism comes into play, writes All About Space’s David Crookes:


It’s also where physics enters the picture. Some scientists have posited that the thing we think of as consciousness is made of micro-scale quantum physics events and other “spooky actions at a distance,” somehow fluttering inside our brains and generating conscious thoughts................

Buddhism has been teaching a Universal Consciousness for 2500 years. It's in the notion that we are all interconnected, whether we like it or not, with every other being and object in the Universe. "Emptiness is Form, and Form is Emptiness" There is no independent origination, all things arise dependent and reliant on all other creations for their existence.

Interconnectedness is further born out by the Quantum Entanglement principle of physics whereby if you separate a pair of electrons and stimulate one, the other immediately responds regardless of the distance.

What honors one honors all and what harms one harms all. Buddhists and the indigenous peoples have understood this concept for centuries, but in the US it runs smack into the inherently flawed notion of the "rugged individual" pulling himself up by his bootstraps.

Yes, the Universe is indeed alive and aware.
 

faceman

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Buddhism has been teaching a Universal Consciousness for 2500 years. It's in the notion that we are all interconnected, whether we like it or not, with every other being and object in the Universe. "Emptiness is Form, and Form is Emptiness" There is no independent origination, all things arise dependent and reliant on all other creations for their existence.

Interconnectedness is further born out by the Quantum Entanglement principle of physics whereby if you separate a pair of electrons and stimulate one, the other immediately responds regardless of the distance.

What honors one honors all and what harms one harms all. Buddhists and the indigenous peoples have understood this concept for centuries, but in the US it runs smack into the inherently flawed notion of the "rugged individual" pulling himself up by his bootstraps.

Yes, the Universe is indeed alive and aware.

My wife is Bhuddist. I'm a southern baptist. One thing both religions share in common is treat your fellow person as you would yourself. it's advice not to hard to follow. The golden rule crosses all religions .
 

SystemShock

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Strong bones do help though. Bears for example have bones that are 4 times more dense than Humans. It's the main reason A grizzly or polar bear would easily dispatch a lion or tiger in a fight. Felines have lightweight bones built for speed . It's natures way of allowing them to chase down prey over a short distance. One paw swipe from a Kodiak or Polar bear would easily break the spine of any feline. Yes, I'm a nerd who researches useless info like this :)

My issue is with the way the study was conducted: "these get milk, those don't, let's see who breaks more bones" isn't a good premise.
 

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