Science! (1 Viewer)

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bonnjer

bonnjer

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Bad news, when this happens to our sun, every planet in our solar system will be instantly vaporized.


The good news. We still have a few more million years.
I still find it absolutely incredible that we have technology that can see things like this that are so far away. Love it!
 

Eeyore

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Bad news, when this happens to our sun, every planet in our solar system will be instantly vaporized.


The good news. We still have a few more million years.
I'm here for it! 🥳
 

Optimus Prime

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None of the potentially habitable Earth-like exoplanets known to astronomers today have the right conditions to sustain life as we know it on Earth, with a rich biosphere of plants, microbes and animals, a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society on Wednesday (June 23), assessed the basic conditions for oxygen-based photosynthesis on ten Earth-like exoplanets with known masses that orbit in the so-called habitable zones around their stars.

The habitable zone is a region around a star with the right temperature for the presence of liquid water, a major prerequisite for the existence of life as we know it on Earth. However, the study, by a team of astronomers from the University of Naples, Italy, found that being in the habitable zone by itself is not enough.

Photosynthesis, the life-giving process that allows plants and some microorganisms to convert light into organic matter, producing oxygen as a by-product, requires the right amount of sunlight. Not all stars can provide that.

The researchers calculated how much photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) — radiation in the wavelength range between 400 to 700 nanometers that photosynthetic organisms can use — the planets receive from their stars. They found that the planets orbit frequently around stars that are too cool to provide enough PAR. For example, a star about half the temperature of the sun would provide enough PAR to power some photosynthesis but not enough to create such a rich biosphere as Earth has.

In fact, only one of the planets in the studied sample, Kepler-442b, a super Earth orbiting a star some 1,200 light years away in the constellation Lyra, came close to receiving enough PAR to sustain a large biosphere, the scientists said in a statement...............

 

Optimus Prime

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In news that’s a lot less sinister than it sounds, but no less exciting, Russian scientists have revived and cloned 24,000-year-old zombies.

Don’t worry—this isn’t a Walking Dead situation. The undead organisms in questions are called bdelloid rotifers, or microscopic “wheel animals” named for their circular mouths surrounded by tiny hairs. Like the more charismatic tardigrade, bdelloid rotifers are extremophiles—organisms that can withstand astonishing conditions like red-hot undersea vents or the vacuum of space.

For this experiment, the scientists went to Siberia and carved off a slice of permafrost, the term for ground that permanently stays frozen. This particular area has been frozen since at least the end of the Pleistocene epoch (2.6 million to 11,700 years ago).

The scientists took the frozen rotifers and thawed them gently, at which point the rotifers began to just live their lives again, including their characteristic asexual reproduction. The secret of the rotifers’ success is a state of suspended animation called cryptobiosis..............

 

WhoDatPhan78

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In news that’s a lot less sinister than it sounds, but no less exciting, Russian scientists have revived and cloned 24,000-year-old zombies.

Don’t worry—this isn’t a Walking Dead situation. The undead organisms in questions are called bdelloid rotifers, or microscopic “wheel animals” named for their circular mouths surrounded by tiny hairs. Like the more charismatic tardigrade, bdelloid rotifers are extremophiles—organisms that can withstand astonishing conditions like red-hot undersea vents or the vacuum of space.

For this experiment, the scientists went to Siberia and carved off a slice of permafrost, the term for ground that permanently stays frozen. This particular area has been frozen since at least the end of the Pleistocene epoch (2.6 million to 11,700 years ago).

The scientists took the frozen rotifers and thawed them gently, at which point the rotifers began to just live their lives again, including their characteristic asexual reproduction. The secret of the rotifers’ success is a state of suspended animation called cryptobiosis..............

I hope those things can't transmit viruses. We don't need no 10,000 or 1 million year old virus coming back to life(ish).
 

faceman

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I hope those things can't transmit viruses. We don't need no 10,000 or 1 million year old virus coming back to life(ish).
We'd probably be ok. Our ancestors have passed down genetic resistance. I remember the debate when Jurassic Park was first released. Dinosaurs and other animals would be far more vulnerable to modern viruses than we are to ancient ones
 
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We'd probably be ok. Our ancestors have passed down genetic resistance. I remember the debate when Jurassic Park was first released. Dinosaurs and other animals would be far more vulnerable to modern viruses than we are to ancient ones
Over that amount of time could that resistance have faded significantly?
 

faceman

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Yatman

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the war of the worlds
1898 = book by h.g. wells
1938 = radio drama by orson welles
1953 = movie 1
2005 = movie 2
 

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