Science! (9 Viewers)

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
12,491
Reaction score
16,409
Online
Scientists have created a new phase of matter, in which time has two dimensions.

The creation of an “extra” dimension in time could change the way we think about matter as well as helping build quantum computers that could themselves change the world, according to the researchers who found it.

And the perplexing quality was discovered in an almost equally astonishing way: by shining lasers, flashing in a pattern of pulses inspired by the Fibonacci sequence, at atoms inside of a quantum computer…..

 

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
12,491
Reaction score
16,409
Online
Scientists have found an unusual and repetitive signal coming from a distant galaxy.

The blast of radio energy is flashing, in a pattern that has been likened to a heartbeat.

Scientists say it is a fast radio burst, or the still-mysterious and powerful blasts of energy that come from deep in space, and which scientists still do not understand. But it is strange among those blasts: it is nowhere near as fast, lasting for up to three seconds rather than the milliseconds of usual FRBs.


The signal is flashing in a “periodic” pattern of a kind that is rarely found in the universe. The bursts of energy repeat every 0.2 seconds.

Daniele Michilli, a postdoc at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, said: “There are not many things in the universe that emit strictly periodic signals.

“Examples that we know of in our own galaxy are radio pulsars and magnetars, which rotate and produce a beamed emission similar to a lighthouse.

“And we think this new signal could be a magnetar or pulsar on steroids.”

Called FRB 20191221A, the signal is currently the longest-lasting FRB, with the clearest periodic pattern, detected to date……

 

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
12,491
Reaction score
16,409
Online
Anyone a napper?

I usually have to be sick or really really tired to sleep during the day

And I’m not one of those people who can close their eyes for two minutes are fast asleep

=======================
CNN) - People who often nap have a greater chance of developing high blood pressure and having a stroke, a large new study has found.

"This may be because, although taking a nap itself is not harmful, many people who take naps may do so because of poor sleep at night.

Poor sleep at night is associated with poorer health, and naps are not enough to make up for that," said clinical psychologist Michael Grandner in a statement.

Grandner directs the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinic at the Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona, and was not involved in the study.

Study participants who typically napped during the day were 12% more likely to develop high blood pressure over time and were 24% more likely to have a stroke compared with people who never napped.

If the person was younger than age 60, napping most days raised the risk of developing high blood pressure by 20% compared with people who never or rarely nap, according to the study published Monday in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. The AHA recently added sleep duration as one of its eight essential metrics to optimal heart and brain health……


 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
47,234
Reaction score
38,806
Age
51
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
Anyone a napper?

I usually have to be sick or really really tired to sleep during the day

And I’m not one of those people who can close their eyes for two minutes are fast asleep

=======================
CNN) - People who often nap have a greater chance of developing high blood pressure and having a stroke, a large new study has found.

"This may be because, although taking a nap itself is not harmful, many people who take naps may do so because of poor sleep at night.

Poor sleep at night is associated with poorer health, and naps are not enough to make up for that," said clinical psychologist Michael Grandner in a statement.

Grandner directs the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinic at the Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona, and was not involved in the study.

Study participants who typically napped during the day were 12% more likely to develop high blood pressure over time and were 24% more likely to have a stroke compared with people who never napped.

If the person was younger than age 60, napping most days raised the risk of developing high blood pressure by 20% compared with people who never or rarely nap, according to the study published Monday in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal. The AHA recently added sleep duration as one of its eight essential metrics to optimal heart and brain health……


Yeah, the only time I ever nap is when I'm stupid tired from a lack of sleep. That might happen once a month, if that.
 

faceman

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Jun 1, 2000
Messages
8,758
Reaction score
10,178
Age
60
Online
Wow! If you could predict quakes 48 hours in advance, that would save countless lives. Of course, you would still get a few, "I'll ride it out" people, but most that could, would leave.
I remember watching the 89 world series when that quake hit SF. I've always said I'll take a hurricane any day. We can see them coming .
 

Sailorsaint

Guest
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
5,654
Reaction score
9,658
Online
I figured this fits here as well as anywhere. Russia says they are going to leave the ISS and build their own space station after 2024. Riiiight, you can't build guided missiles but you're going to build and equip a new space station.....

 
OP
OP
bonnjer

bonnjer

Let the Wins Count begin!
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Oct 24, 2000
Messages
13,396
Reaction score
10,730
Age
44
Online
 

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
12,491
Reaction score
16,409
Online
A group of scientists has concluded that ancient Europeans drank milk for millennia despite the digestive problems it may have caused, casting doubt on theories on how humans evolved to tolerate it.

Scientists have long speculated that an enzyme needed to avoid any gastrointestinal discomfort developed rapidly in populations where domesticating dairy animals was prevalent.


People who could tolerate milk, that theory goes, gained a new source of calories and protein and passed on their genes to more healthy offspring than those without the genetic trait — known as lactase persistence — that allows them to digest the sugar in milk into adulthood.

But a new study has offered a radically different theory, arguing that side effects such as gas, bloating and intestinal cramps weren’t enough on their own to move the evolutionary needle on the genetic mutation.

“Prehistoric people in Europe may have started consuming milk from domesticated animals thousands of years before they evolved the gene to digest it,” the study’s authors said.

The study, published in the journal Nature, was produced in collaboration with more than 100 scientists across a range of fields including genetics, archaeology and epidemiology. The scientists mapped out estimated milk consumption in Europe from approximately 9,000 years ago to 500 years ago.

By analyzing animal fat residues in pottery from hundreds of archaeological sites, alongside DNA samples harvested from ancient skeletons, the researchers concluded that lactase persistence was not common until around 1,000 B.C., nearly 4,000 years after it was first detected.......

 

faceman

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Jun 1, 2000
Messages
8,758
Reaction score
10,178
Age
60
Online
A group of scientists has concluded that ancient Europeans drank milk for millennia despite the digestive problems it may have caused, casting doubt on theories on how humans evolved to tolerate it.

Scientists have long speculated that an enzyme needed to avoid any gastrointestinal discomfort developed rapidly in populations where domesticating dairy animals was prevalent.


People who could tolerate milk, that theory goes, gained a new source of calories and protein and passed on their genes to more healthy offspring than those without the genetic trait — known as lactase persistence — that allows them to digest the sugar in milk into adulthood.

But a new study has offered a radically different theory, arguing that side effects such as gas, bloating and intestinal cramps weren’t enough on their own to move the evolutionary needle on the genetic mutation.

“Prehistoric people in Europe may have started consuming milk from domesticated animals thousands of years before they evolved the gene to digest it,” the study’s authors said.

The study, published in the journal Nature, was produced in collaboration with more than 100 scientists across a range of fields including genetics, archaeology and epidemiology. The scientists mapped out estimated milk consumption in Europe from approximately 9,000 years ago to 500 years ago.

By analyzing animal fat residues in pottery from hundreds of archaeological sites, alongside DNA samples harvested from ancient skeletons, the researchers concluded that lactase persistence was not common until around 1,000 B.C., nearly 4,000 years after it was first detected.......

Milk is better for hydration thane plain water.
 

Optimus Prime

Subscribing Member
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jul 18, 1998
Messages
12,491
Reaction score
16,409
Online
As the British research vessel RRS Shackleton steamed toward Antarctica in 1971, scientist James Lovelock was a familiar presence on deck along with his invention: an ultrasensitive instrument that could detect virtually any trace of pollutants and other environmental toxins.


Even in the most remote reaches of the South Atlantic, Dr. Lovelock’s device found that the air carried chlorofluorocarbons then used in aerosols, refrigerants and other commercial applications.


It was a moment where the major threads of Dr. Lovelock’s groundbreaking work and theories began to braid into one. He was already exploring his hypothesis that Earth itself is a fully interwoven ecosystem — “like a gigantic living thing” — that can self-regulate to sustain life.


The readings from the ship brought a sharper edge to his Gaia theory, named after the Greek goddess who personified the Earth.

It showed no place on the planet was untouched by man-made threats to the environment, findings that helped launch Dr. Lovelock’s reputation as a planetary caretaker with an ailing patient.


“The biosphere and I are both in the last 1% or our lives,” Dr. Lovelock told the Guardian in 2020.

It was an environmental warning repeated in many variations during a more than 80-year career of remarkable scientific range and originality — winning widespread praise as a visionary and scorn as a doomsday fatalist……

 

Eeyore

Ded inside
VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Aug 1, 1997
Messages
21,444
Reaction score
16,666
Age
51
Location
The People's Republic of Indianastan
Offline
Wow! If you could predict quakes 48 hours in advance, that would save countless lives. Of course, you would still get a few, "I'll ride it out" people, but most that could, would leave.
We thought that people would take a vaccine to prevent a deadly virus too
 

Crzycjunx76

Iron Era Origional
Joined
Nov 28, 2001
Messages
6,408
Reaction score
4,655
Age
42
Location
Seattle by way of Texas, originating in SELA.
Offline
As the British research vessel RRS Shackleton steamed toward Antarctica in 1971, scientist James Lovelock was a familiar presence on deck along with his invention: an ultrasensitive instrument that could detect virtually any trace of pollutants and other environmental toxins.


Even in the most remote reaches of the South Atlantic, Dr. Lovelock’s device found that the air carried chlorofluorocarbons then used in aerosols, refrigerants and other commercial applications.


It was a moment where the major threads of Dr. Lovelock’s groundbreaking work and theories began to braid into one. He was already exploring his hypothesis that Earth itself is a fully interwoven ecosystem — “like a gigantic living thing” — that can self-regulate to sustain life.


The readings from the ship brought a sharper edge to his Gaia theory, named after the Greek goddess who personified the Earth.

It showed no place on the planet was untouched by man-made threats to the environment, findings that helped launch Dr. Lovelock’s reputation as a planetary caretaker with an ailing patient.


“The biosphere and I are both in the last 1% or our lives,” Dr. Lovelock told the Guardian in 2020.

It was an environmental warning repeated in many variations during a more than 80-year career of remarkable scientific range and originality — winning widespread praise as a visionary and scorn as a doomsday fatalist……

Does this mans toombstone read "I told you so" ? Because if it does not, it should.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users who are viewing this thread

New Orleans Saints Twitter Feed

 

Headlines

Top Bottom