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Optimus Prime

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Researchers have used deceased spiders’ legs as mechanical grippers in a macabre experiment.

Rice University mechanical engineers have been developing ‘necrobotics’ based on existing research of using non-traditional materials like hydrogels and elastomers that can reach to chemicals or light – in this instance using a spider that they killed and experimented on.

“This area of soft robotics is a lot of fun because we get to use previously untapped types of actuation and materials,” Daniel Preston of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineeringsaid

“The spider falls into this line of inquiry. It’s something that hasn’t been used before but has a lot of potential.”

Spiders use hydraulics to move their limbs, rather than muscles. A chamber near their head contracks to send blood to the limbs, and when it expands the legs extend and release……

 

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Researchers have used deceased spiders’ legs as mechanical grippers in a macabre experiment.

Rice University mechanical engineers have been developing ‘necrobotics’ based on existing research of using non-traditional materials like hydrogels and elastomers that can reach to chemicals or light – in this instance using a spider that they killed and experimented on.

“This area of soft robotics is a lot of fun because we get to use previously untapped types of actuation and materials,” Daniel Preston of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineeringsaid

“The spider falls into this line of inquiry. It’s something that hasn’t been used before but has a lot of potential.”

Spiders use hydraulics to move their limbs, rather than muscles. A chamber near their head contracks to send blood to the limbs, and when it expands the legs extend and release……

Well we know where this is going…
1659310356007.jpeg
 

DaveXA

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Researchers have used deceased spiders’ legs as mechanical grippers in a macabre experiment.

Rice University mechanical engineers have been developing ‘necrobotics’ based on existing research of using non-traditional materials like hydrogels and elastomers that can reach to chemicals or light – in this instance using a spider that they killed and experimented on.

“This area of soft robotics is a lot of fun because we get to use previously untapped types of actuation and materials,” Daniel Preston of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineeringsaid

“The spider falls into this line of inquiry. It’s something that hasn’t been used before but has a lot of potential.”

Spiders use hydraulics to move their limbs, rather than muscles. A chamber near their head contracks to send blood to the limbs, and when it expands the legs extend and release……

 

Eeyore

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Researchers have used deceased spiders’ legs as mechanical grippers in a macabre experiment.

Rice University mechanical engineers have been developing ‘necrobotics’ based on existing research of using non-traditional materials like hydrogels and elastomers that can reach to chemicals or light – in this instance using a spider that they killed and experimented on.

“This area of soft robotics is a lot of fun because we get to use previously untapped types of actuation and materials,” Daniel Preston of Rice’s George R. Brown School of Engineeringsaid

“The spider falls into this line of inquiry. It’s something that hasn’t been used before but has a lot of potential.”

Spiders use hydraulics to move their limbs, rather than muscles. A chamber near their head contracks to send blood to the limbs, and when it expands the legs extend and release……

A bit disrespectful to the spiders
 

Optimus Prime

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I'm sure this will be just like the square bunker on the moon
=======================================

NASA’s Perseverance rover captured an unusual image of something lying in the red sand of Mars: a bundle of string.

The rover’s front left hazard avoidance camera took a photo of the light-colored object on July 12 that some people likened to spaghetti.

Officials at the space agency confirmed that they believe the object to be a string left over from Perseverance’s landing.

The string could be from the rover or its descent stage, a component similar to a rocket-powered jet pack used to safely lower the rover to the planet’s surface, according to a spokesperson for the Perseverance mission at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Perseverance had not previously been in the area where the string was found, so it’s likely the wind blew it there, the spokesperson said...........


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CoolBrees

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Damn we haven’t even gotten humans to Mars yet and we are already leaving garbage behind.

Next I bet you they find one of those flossers. Those effing things are everywhere
 

Sailorsaint

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I'm sure this will be just like the square bunker on the moon
=======================================

NASA’s Perseverance rover captured an unusual image of something lying in the red sand of Mars: a bundle of string.

The rover’s front left hazard avoidance camera took a photo of the light-colored object on July 12 that some people likened to spaghetti.

Officials at the space agency confirmed that they believe the object to be a string left over from Perseverance’s landing.

The string could be from the rover or its descent stage, a component similar to a rocket-powered jet pack used to safely lower the rover to the planet’s surface, according to a spokesperson for the Perseverance mission at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Perseverance had not previously been in the area where the string was found, so it’s likely the wind blew it there, the spokesperson said...........


1659386471201.png

1659386493162.png
A baby overlord...

DWldF2kXkAAypAg.jpg
 

Optimus Prime

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Nearly every sea turtle born on the beaches of Florida in the past four years has been female, according to scientists.

The spike in female baby turtles comes as a result of intense heatwaves triggered by a growing climate crisis that is significantly warming up the sands on some beaches, as CNN reported this week.

According to the National Ocean Service, if a turtle’s eggs incubate below 27C (82F), the turtle hatchlings will be male. If the eggs incubate above 31C (89F), the hatchlings will be female. Temperatures that waver between the two extremes will result in a mix of male and female baby turtles……

 

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Since there's no camera aimed at the solar arrays, the team had to figure out another way to find the problem. To that end, they fired the spacecraft's thrusters to measure any anomalous vibrations, and created a detailed model of the array's motor assembly to determine the array's rigidness. They finally figured out that a lanyard designed to pull the array open was probably snagged on its spool.
 

porculator

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Nearly every sea turtle born on the beaches of Florida in the past four years has been female, according to scientists.

The spike in female baby turtles comes as a result of intense heatwaves triggered by a growing climate crisis that is significantly warming up the sands on some beaches, as CNN reported this week.

According to the National Ocean Service, if a turtle’s eggs incubate below 27C (82F), the turtle hatchlings will be male. If the eggs incubate above 31C (89F), the hatchlings will be female. Temperatures that waver between the two extremes will result in a mix of male and female baby turtles……


In theory that could create a population boom (think one rooster, dozens of hens) though I'm sure there are lots of other factors at play. The effects won't be known for a really long time though, since from what I understand turtles don't start boning for a while
 

0rion

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In theory that could create a population boom (think one rooster, dozens of hens) though I'm sure there are lots of other factors at play. The effects won't be known for a really long time though, since from what I understand turtles don't start boning for a while
Sounds like a great time to be a male turtle....even an ugly fat one.
 

Optimus Prime

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Hours after pumping synthetic fluids through the bodies of dead pigs, a team of researchers from Yale University observed their hearts beginning to beat faintly. Blood circulation was restored, and some cellular functions were revived in vital organs such as the heart and liver.


The peer-reviewed findings, published Wednesday in Nature, have far-reaching consequences in medical fields such as organ transplantation.

But they also add to the thorny ethical issues surrounding the definition of death, as the distinction between the dead and the living becomes increasingly blurred.


According to the Nature article, the Yale research team used the OrganEx system — consisting of a device similar to the heart-lung machines used in surgery and the experimental mixture of fluids that promotes cellular health and reduces inflammation — on pigs one hour after they no longer had a pulse.

Another group of dead pigs was put on ECMO, a life-support measure that oxygenates the blood outside of the body. By the end of the six-hour trial, the scientists found that the OrganEx technology was capable of delivering “adequate levels of oxygen” to the pigs’ whole bodies, which restored certain key cellular functions in organs such as the heart, liver and kidneys.


“Under the microscope, it was difficult to tell the difference between a healthy organ and one which had been treated with OrganEx technology after death,” Zvonimir Vrselja, a neuroscientist at the Yale School of Medicine who took part in the study, said in a news release……..

 

Sailorsaint

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Hours after pumping synthetic fluids through the bodies of dead pigs, a team of researchers from Yale University observed their hearts beginning to beat faintly. Blood circulation was restored, and some cellular functions were revived in vital organs such as the heart and liver.


The peer-reviewed findings, published Wednesday in Nature, have far-reaching consequences in medical fields such as organ transplantation.

But they also add to the thorny ethical issues surrounding the definition of death, as the distinction between the dead and the living becomes increasingly blurred.


According to the Nature article, the Yale research team used the OrganEx system — consisting of a device similar to the heart-lung machines used in surgery and the experimental mixture of fluids that promotes cellular health and reduces inflammation — on pigs one hour after they no longer had a pulse.

Another group of dead pigs was put on ECMO, a life-support measure that oxygenates the blood outside of the body. By the end of the six-hour trial, the scientists found that the OrganEx technology was capable of delivering “adequate levels of oxygen” to the pigs’ whole bodies, which restored certain key cellular functions in organs such as the heart, liver and kidneys.


“Under the microscope, it was difficult to tell the difference between a healthy organ and one which had been treated with OrganEx technology after death,” Zvonimir Vrselja, a neuroscientist at the Yale School of Medicine who took part in the study, said in a news release……..

But, without brain activity, death is death. You can keep a body alive mechanically, but not a brain. Once the brain is dead, it's all over.
 

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