Squeaky brakes (1 Viewer)

SaintShane

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So I changed the brake pads and rotors on my wife's Lincoln Aviator(like a ford explorer) last week. For some reason, they seem to squeak badly when you break now.

Is there anything that can be put on the rotors to stop this?

The first day they didn't b/c they had that oily coating that they put on new rotors to stop them from rusting in the box, but as soon as it wore off, they seem to squeak. It also seems to come from one side. And if you really hit them hard, they don't, but just normal breaking they do.

Anyone have any ideas?

Thanks
 

BHM

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Oh man, tell me you did not leave that oil coating on the rotors?




The new rotors should be cleaned with brake cleaner before re-installing the calipers. It is possible they are now glazed. Did you change the pads as well?



The key to a good brake job is new(clean) rotors and new ceramic pads. Now depending on the type and make of pads, they may or may not have a insulator pad on the back of the pad. Does not really matter anyway, you need to spray this stuff on the backs of the pads.



41Q7ntnbhlL._SS500_.jpg








Proper pad break in is important as well. I normally drive it up to about 50mph and stop very aggressively about five times in a row.

Take a look at your rotors for any signs of glazing. If they are, get them turned down and re-installed with the dosc brake quiet sprayed on the backs of the pads.
 

Redfish

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Its worth it to pay the extra for ceramic disc pads.
 
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SaintShane

SaintShane

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BHM,
I did not clean the rotors off, per say. There was just a little oil??? on them...like someone sprayed them with a very light lubricant to prevent rusting.

How would I tell if they are "glazed"?

I will try to find the can of stuff or something similar at the local autoparts store tomorrow that you posted the pic of.

I'm not sure what pads and rotors I used, as my father has a corporate account at O'Reilly and he picked them up for me. My dad always goes with the higher end parts, so I would think they are the best that were offered.

Thanks, any and all advice is appreciated.
 

BHM

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The oil that is sprayed on the rotors is exactly as you thought, to prevent rusting shile in storage. The way brakes work is through friction. The friction of the pads squeezing on the rotors is what makes the vehicle stop. With the oil on the rotors, that friction was reduced and it took a lot more pressure to stop which may have overheated the rotors. You may be ok...


If you look at the rotor surface, it should be uniform with no shiny spots and it should almost have a rough texture appearence. If thet look real shiny or glassy, they are probably glazed. I would remove the pads and spray the disc quiet on the backs of the pads and let dry for 15 minutes or so. I like two or three coats. Try not to getany on the pad surfaces.

While that is drying, you can take some very very fine sandpaper and lightly scuff up the rotor surface on both sides. Sand from the center of the rotor out to the outer edges. This should remove any light glazing they may have. Get a can of brake clean and spray the rotors down.


They also have little packs of brake grease. Use that grease on the points where the pads sit in the brackets and if you have floating calipers, grease the little piston sliders.



H6_8.jpg




This is a picture of the slider. Grease it up real well and stick it back in making sure the rubber boot snaps back in place to seal it off. If you look right above his index finger, there are the two horizontal slots where the pads sit in. Stick a little bake grease there as well.

Re-install the pads and give it a drive with a few hard stops from 40 or 50mph all the way to a full stop.
 

Goatman Saint

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Pull the pads off. Get a tube of silicone and put a thin layer on the back of the pad where it meets the caliper. Let it set up then put them back together. If you use metallic pads they Squeek when you use them. Old mechanics trick to get them to be quiet.
 

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