Stalled Out on Tesla’s Electric Highway (1 Viewer)

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
I got home late last night, and rather than watch re-runs of the Mary Tyler Moore show, which is my normal 9:00 pm viewing, I wandered over to Bloomberg TV. And son of a gun, if Elon Musk wasn't on Bloomberg West with Emily Chang complaining vehemently about a review of his $100,000+ Tesla in the NY Times. Apparently the car ran out of juice on the test drive. Uh-Oh.

Doh! I almost forgot the obligatory Bloomberg West Host pic, Emily Chang.

Stalled Out on Tesla’s Electric Highway
WASHINGTON — Having established a fast-charging foothold in California for its electric cars, Tesla Motors has brought its formula east, opening two ultrafast charging stations in December that would, in theory, allow a speedy electric-car road trip between here and Boston.

But as I discovered on a recent test drive of the company’s high-performance Model S sedan, theory can be trumped by reality, especially when Northeast temperatures plunge.

Tesla, the electric-car manufacturer run by Elon Musk, the billionaire behind PayPal and SpaceX, offered a high-performance Model S sedan for a trip along the newly electrified stretch of Interstate 95. It seemed an ideal bookend to The Times’s encouraging test drive last September on the West Coast.

The new charging points, at service plazas in Newark, Del., and Milford, Conn., are some 200 miles apart. That is well within the Model S’s 265-mile estimated range, as rated by the Environmental Protection Agency, for the version with an 85 kilowatt-hour battery that I drove — and even more comfortably within Tesla’s claim of 300 miles of range under ideal conditions. Of course, mileage may vary.

The 480-volt Supercharger stations deliver enough power for 150 miles of travel in 30 minutes, and a full charge in about an hour, for the 85 kilowatt-hour Model S. (Adding the fast-charge option to cars with the midlevel 60 kilowatt-hour battery costs $2,000.) That’s quite a bit longer than it takes to pump 15 gallons of gasoline, but at Supercharger stations Tesla pays for the electricity, which seems a reasonable trade for fast, silent and emissions-free driving. Besides, what’s Sbarro for?
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/automobiles/stalled-on-the-ev-highway.html?_r=0

So if you see some poor individual stranded by the side of the road next to their $100,000 Tesla, out of juice, do the right thing, loan them your cell phone, give them a ride into town. They're probably already embarrassed enough with the incident, no use adding fuel to the fire.
 

Attachments

OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
More Uh-Oh...this time from the Washington Post's Charles Lane:

The electric car mistake
The Obama administration’s electric-car fantasy finally may have died on the road between Newark, Del., and Milford, Conn.

The New York Times’s John M. Broder reported Friday that the Tesla Model S electric car he was test-driving repeatedly ran out of juice, partly because cold weather reduces the battery’s range by about 10 percent.

Broder’s trip turned into a nightmare, including a stretch with the conked-out car riding the back of a flatbed truck.

The Times is standing by its story. My take is that even if Musk is 100 percent right and Broder is 100 percent wrong — which I doubt — Musk loses.

Who wants a $101,000 car that might die just because you feel like taking “a long detour”?

President Obama repeatedly declared that, with enough federal aid, we can put a million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. His administration has invested about $5 billion in grants, guaranteed loans — including $465 million for Tesla — and tax incentives to buyers.

Yet Americans bought just 71,000 plug-in hybrids or all-electric vehicles in the past two years, according to GreenCarReports.com. That’s about a third as many as the Energy Department forecast in a 2011 report that attempted to explain why Obama’s goal was not preposterous.

Federal billions cannot overcome the fact that electric vehicles and plug-in electric hybrids meet few, if any, of real consumers’ needs. Compared with gas-powered cars, they deliver inferior performance at much higher cost. As an American Physical Society symposium on battery research concluded last June: “Despite their many potential advantages, all-electric vehicles will not replace the standard American family car in the foreseeable future.”

If you don’t believe the scientists, listen to Takeshi Uchiyamada, the “father” of the Toyota Prius: “Because of its shortcomings — driving range, cost and recharging time — the electric vehicle is not a viable replacement for most conventional cars.”

Even Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn, whose commitment to the all-electric Leaf helped his firm get a $1.4 billion U.S. loan guarantee, has reduced his boosterism in the face of disappointing sales.

As for Vice President Biden’s 2009 forecast of “billions and billions and billions of dollars in good, new jobs,” the electric car factory at which he made that statement sits idle. Ditto the taxpayer-backed Michigan factory of battery maker LG Chem. Two Energy Department-funded lithium-ion battery makers have gone bankrupt.

There’s simply no denying that the administration’s electric-vehicle project was a mistake.

Rather, the debacle is a case study in unchecked righteousness. The administration assumed the worthiness and urgency of its goals. Americans should want electric cars, and therefore they would, apparently.
Charles Lane: Obama
 

Taurus

More than 15K posts served!
VIP Contributor
Joined
Dec 20, 1997
Messages
26,084
Reaction score
15,895
Age
52
Location
Yacolt, WA
Offline
Sounds like the kind of review you could've read in 1902 about them new-fangled horseless carriages.
 

UncleTrvlingJim

Administrator
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
24,772
Reaction score
10,792
Offline
If the review is honest it's a problem for Tesla - it does not deliver the range it advertises. If instead Tesla is correct and the review is a fake (ie the driver took detours and didn't actually fully charge his battery), then it's just BS and *****ing and moaning.
 
OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
If the review is honest it's a problem for Tesla - it does not deliver the range it advertises. If instead Tesla is correct and the review is a fake (ie the driver took detours and didn't actually fully charge his battery), then it's just BS and *****ing and moaning.
Whether the reviewer wandered a bit off course or not, I think the much larger problem is if the car is telling you 85 miles of range and you've really got 67 miles of range, that's a long walk home, especially in a pair Allen Edmonds.
 
OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
Sounds like the kind of review you could've read in 1902 about them new-fangled horseless carriages.
I'd defintiely buy one...If I had an extra $100,000+ to spend, and didn't have to make long distance trips, and had a charging station close by, and trusted the mileage available indicator...
 

Sun Wukong

Worlds Deadliest Fighting Arts Champion and Master
Joined
Oct 6, 2009
Messages
11,664
Reaction score
26,342
Location
Around
Online
Sounds like the kind of review you could've read in 1902 about them new-fangled horseless carriages.
Cars were already being mass-produced by 1902 and there were a couple of dozen manufacturers within a year or two after that, but your point still stands.
 
OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
Sounds like the kind of review you could've read in 1902 about them new-fangled horseless carriages.
Or, much closer to the mark, a failed technology that's being artificially propped-up. The arrogance of using taxpayer monies to prop up such failures is nothing short of Forrest Gump territory, stupid is as stupid does.

Biggest Tech Failures of The Last 10+ Years - TechSpot

There are lots of failures in the world, for a variety of reasons, and many times by huge, otherwise successful companies. But failure needs to be allowed to fall by the wayside and be replaced by products more acceptable to the people who use the products. No use continuing to bang our collective heads against the wall in a vain attempt to prove political points, we're beginning to draw blood at this point.
 

UncleTrvlingJim

Administrator
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
24,772
Reaction score
10,792
Offline
Whether the reviewer wandered a bit off course or not, I think the much larger problem is if the car is telling you 85 miles of range and you've really got 67 miles of range, that's a long walk home, especially in a pair Allen Edmonds.
If that is true then Tesla has a problem -- if the car isn't reliable. Although my gas car currently can't tell me how much range I have left, just a light saying I'm low.
 
OP

dapperdan

Super Forum Fanatic
Joined
Jul 29, 1998
Messages
11,295
Reaction score
7,242
Age
58
Location
Juanita Beach, WA
Offline
If that is true then Tesla has a problem -- if the car isn't reliable. Although my gas car currently can't tell me how much range I have left, just a light saying I'm low.
But you know when you need to pull into a gas station. Also, we know that mostly all cars give some leeway when you hit Empty, heck, Seinfeld had part of an episode devoted to that topic.

Just from a common sense perspective, I would think it's a problem.

Funny thing is, there is a Tesla dealership just a few blocks down from where I work. I know one of the salesmen at the dealership and went down to sit in it. It is a VERY cool car. In all seriousness, it is totally cool. Looks cool...and when you go to the swanky Bellevue bars after work, there is usually one in the parking lot, amongst the Porsche's and the Mercedes' and Lexus'. It's definitely got stature. If it wasn't for that pesky problem that it doesn't always work all that well.
 

dtc

VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
29,298
Reaction score
28,320
Location
Redneck Riviera
Offline
I saw that as well, in the Charles Lane column...I'll say this, Musk was putting up one heck of a fuss last night on Bloomberg...but the part of the interview that cracked me up was when Emily Chang started angling to get a Tesla for Bloomberg's West (her) to test drive. Musk suggested a drive from SF to Lake Tahoe.
There was a curious mention of a heater in the original review.

Is it missing somewhere that running the heater would somehow kill the range or is the whole review a hoax perpetrated only so right wingers would post it on their FB and blogs?
 

UncleTrvlingJim

Administrator
Administrator
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 22, 2000
Messages
24,772
Reaction score
10,792
Offline
But you know when you need to pull into a gas station. Also, we know that mostly all cars give some leeway when you hit Empty, heck, Seinfeld had part of an episode devoted to that topic.

Just from a common sense perspective, I would think it's a problem.

Funny thing is, there is a Tesla dealership just a few blocks down from where I work. I know one of the salesmen at the dealership and went down to sit in it. It is a VERY cool car. In all seriousness, it is totally cool. Looks cool...and when you go to the swanky Bellevue bars after work, there is usually one in the parking lot, amongst the Porsche's and the Mercedes' and Lexus'. It's definitely got stature. If it wasn't for that pesky problem that it doesn't always work all that well.
From what I read the guy knew he was running low on charge, so it's not like he didn't have a warning. However, electric or gas - if you're going to say if you have X number of miles before you need to charge up then it better be accurate.

That's the only problem I see with the article of merit - does the Model S get the advertised range? How much does the cold effect the range? Is the range estimate reasonably accurate?

Just because someone runs out of fuel doesn't make the Model S a bad car... I've run out of gas in my regular car b/c I thought I could make it to the next station, turns out I was wrong. That wasn't the cars fault.. it performed within advertised ranges.

However, if cold weather drops the range as much as the guy is claiming... that's a problem. If the range estimate is wrong, that's a problem.
 

dtc

VIP Subscribing Member
VIP Contributor
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
29,298
Reaction score
28,320
Location
Redneck Riviera
Offline
Or, much closer to the mark, a failed technology that's being artificially propped-up. The arrogance of using taxpayer monies to prop up such failures is nothing short of Forrest Gump territory, stupid is as stupid does.

Biggest Tech Failures of The Last 10+ Years - TechSpot

There are lots of failures in the world, for a variety of reasons, and many times by huge, otherwise successful companies. But failure needs to be allowed to fall by the wayside and be replaced by products more acceptable to the people who use the products. No use continuing to bang our collective heads against the wall in a vain attempt to prove political points, we're beginning to draw blood at this point.
I love your attitude.

It's as if you think digital watches were a failure because the first ones cost $2,000 when $2,000 would buy a fancy sports car.

I'd bet those idiots that started that silly computer thing where they made the wooden box hold the thing reading tapes or punch cards should have given up way before they got to phones that could manage Apollo 8, huh?
 

Galbreath34

Very Banned
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
May 8, 2008
Messages
32,273
Reaction score
30,806
Offline
IMHO, we're a long way from any pure electric vehicle, luxury sports or not, being viable/safe for intercity travel. Intracity, sure, you're a fool if you don't have your own way to charge at home or if you don't go home for a 20+ laps around the city. There's just no way I'd want to travel in a gasoline powered car if there were only 20 or fewer gas stations in the state either. Until someone sees the curve of enough folks buying them, it's not worth the investment in charging stations all over the place, and until then folks may not want to buy them. First thing would have to be proving out that it's cheaper than gasoline for intracity and getting that nailed, and that seems a decade or more away at least.

It's foolish to even waste time with proof of concept between city stations until you get more than a few early adopters driving them around town.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
El Caliente Tesla could be in trouble Everything Else Board 57

Similar threads



Headlines

Top Bottom