Superdelegate (1 Viewer)

Optimus Prime

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This may be a stupid question but what exactly is a superdelegate?

Why do we have them?

The press seems to be saying that regardless of the normal delegate numbers it's the superdelegates that will decide the nominee. If that's true then why have normal delegates?

How does one become a superdelegate?
 

JimEverett

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Both parties have unpledged delegates, each accounting for roughly 20% of the total delegate total - and the media has called them superdelegates. They are unpledeged because their support of a candidate is not tied to primary or caucus results.
You get to be an unpledged delegate due to your status - as a Member of Congress, member of the party's national committee, etc.
 

Saint by the Bay

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Only the DNC has super delegates and they only have had them since the early 80's I think, maybe the late 70's.
 

Saint by the Bay

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BTW, I recently learned Lieberman was stripped of his Super Delegate status after endorsing McCain.

Just a bit of election year trivia.
 

JimEverett

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Only the DNC has super delegates and they only have had them since the early 80's I think, maybe the late 70's.
Actually - I believe the Republicans have more unpledged delegates as a percentage of the total number of delegates.
The difference is that the Republicans have fewer delegates that become delegates automatically, ie as a result of their status within the party. Some of them are elected at state conventions, some are elected at the primary or caucus, some are appointed, etc. But the fact is that they are unpledged, just like the Democrats.
 

Saint by the Bay

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Actually - I believe the Republicans have more unpledged delegates as a percentage of the total number of delegates.
The difference is that the Republicans have fewer delegates that become delegates automatically, ie as a result of their status within the party. Some of them are elected at state conventions, some are elected at the primary or caucus, some are appointed, etc. But the fact is that they are unpledged, just like the Democrats.
Wow, your right. The Republicans have 538 unpledged delegates which is 24.4% of the total delegates and Dems have 795 unpledged which is 19.6% of their total.

Learn something everyday.
 

johnnyrockets42

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While I can't answer why we have them, I do know this year they are more important than most. There is a target apparently that each candidate needs to cross to secure the nomination (different for each party, obviously), which I assume is 50% of the delegates and super delgates. If a nominee can't do that during the caucuses/primaries then the super delegates can sway the nomination. With Obama and Clinton running so close it is not likely (or probably possible) at this point that either will lock up the nomination without the help of the superdelegate. Therefore, it is actually possible that someone who does not win the popular vote could get nomination by the party.

Remember, in primaries you are not voting for president but who has the chance to run for president within that party. Personally, it seems to be a very misguided system to me, but what about american politics isn't.
 

Saint77

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I once got a few superdelagates in a box of caption crunch. I wasn't able to collect them all unfortunately
 

Saint by the Bay

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I once got a few superdelagates in a box of caption crunch. I wasn't able to collect them all unfortunately
I got Ted Kennedy in a Happy Meal the other day. I just dropped him off at a bar and left.
 

DadsDream

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Here, Optimus...

US NEWS & WORLD REPORT
Meet the Superdelegates: Many Congress Members Reluctant to Choose Between Obama, Clinton
By Nikki Schwab
Posted February 15, 2008


Of the 48 Democratic senators who are eligible to vote as superdelegates at the convention, which includes Washington, D.C.'s "Shadow Senators" Michael Brown and Paul Strauss, more than half have yet to publicly endorse a candidate. Twelve have pledged their support to Clinton, and nine have endorsed Obama. Among those not endorsing are Sens. Chris Dodd and Joe Biden, who both were running for the presidency earlier in the primary season and have since dropped out.

A higher percentage of the 216 eligible House superdelegates have endorsed, with about 73 going for Clinton and 59 choosing Obama. Of those who endorsed, many endorsed regionally. For example, most of the representatives from Illinois are backing Obama, while all the New York delegation and almost all of neighboring New Jersey's representatives support Clinton.

READ MORE
http://www.usnews.com/articles/news...eluctant-to-choose-between-obama-clinton.html

Al Gore's old political consultant, Tad Devine, sums it up with a strong note of caution which Senator Obama's campaign is already starting to use.

"If the superdelegates determine the party's nominee before primary and caucus voters have rendered a clear verdict, Democrats risk losing the trust that we are building with voters today. The perception that the votes of ordinary people don't count as much as those of political insiders, who get to pick the nominee in some mythical back room, could hurt our party for decades to come."
 

Pure Energy

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This may be a stupid question but what exactly is a superdelegate?

Why do we have them?

The press seems to be saying that regardless of the normal delegate numbers it's the superdelegates that will decide the nominee. If that's true then why have normal delegates?

How does one become a superdelegate?
My 7 year old son walked in as I was watching a news story that mentioned Super Delegates. He asked me what is a Super Delegate. I told him and then he said, "Cool, when I grow up I want to be a SUUUPUUURRRRR DELICATE!" as he whisked around the room with his arms stretched outwards.
 

cruize

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Wow, your right. The Republicans have 538 unpledged delegates which is 24.4% of the total delegates and Dems have 795 unpledged which is 19.6% of their total.

Learn something everyday.
The Republicans want to make sure "their" candidate gets the nomination. God forbid the little people actually have a say.
 

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