Taking a new job, plenty of PTO left (1 Viewer)

saintmdterps

I've been dreamin', floatin' down the stream and..
VIP Subscribing Member
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Jan 15, 2007
Messages
17,005
Reaction score
19,602
Age
60
Location
Salisbury, Maryland
Offline
I cannot speak for your employer, but what i can tell you is that a lot of companies (maybe most?) will cut you loose as soon as you inform the that you are resigning/accepting another position/putting in two weeks etc…. So, while I’m not advocating NOT giving two weeks notice, what i am saying is do not worry at all about doing exactly what is best for you in this situation, since most companies would do exactly what is best for them if the situation were reversed.
Maryland is an "at will" state so the 2 weeks notice is a grace you give your employer if they've treated you well. You can quit at any time for any reason or no reason, just as you can be fired at any time for any reason or no reason unless you are protected (or hamstrung) by a contract.
 

Grandadmiral

Infinite Power is da ****
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
23,433
Reaction score
15,721
Age
45
Offline
It varies by employer, so either check with them or your trusty employee handbook. Unless, you're in California, where the laws are much more employee-friendly.
 

Sailorsaint

Guest
Joined
Mar 8, 2005
Messages
143
Reaction score
169
Offline
When I retired from the sheriff's office they paid me for all my accumulated vacation time, but not my accumulated sick days. Google Louisiana Employment Law and see if there are any answers there, or substitute your present state.
 

Complex Kid

Most things I worry about Never happen anyway
Joined
Nov 14, 2002
Messages
12,459
Reaction score
20,859
Age
41
Location
Lake Charles, LA
Online
I’m in Texas, this is about employer friendly a state as there is.


Payouts of accrued leave are required under the Texas Payday Law only if such a payment is promised by the employer in a written policy or agreement. The payout would be controlled by the wording of the policy or agreement. If no such policy exists, the company would not owe such a payment.

I'd check the HR handbook and see what the policy says. It might be if you give 2 weeks they are obligated to pay your accrued time.
 

BELOWSEALEVEL

Almost Heaven :o)
Joined
Mar 27, 2004
Messages
6,515
Reaction score
4,076
Offline
Certain states allow the employer to make the decision on pto pay.
It all depends on the company and the state u live in .
 

Saint_Ward

Don't be a Jerk.
Staff member
Administrator
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 1, 2007
Messages
48,231
Reaction score
42,563
Location
Fort Lauderdale, FL
Offline
It varies by employer, so either check with them or your trusty employee handbook. Unless, you're in California, where the laws are much more employee-friendly.
This. There should be a policy. Or ask HR.

But, I will say that some companies really hate it when you give two weeks notice and use a week or so vacation. So, it sort of defeats the purpose of 2 weeks. Allows them time to get some stuff wrapped up and communicated.

Every company I've worked for pays you for accrued and unused PTO, unless there is a min years thing. They also usually had policies of how much you could carry over, to limit their payouts.
 

Saint_Ward

Don't be a Jerk.
Staff member
Administrator
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Mar 1, 2007
Messages
48,231
Reaction score
42,563
Location
Fort Lauderdale, FL
Offline
Also, depending on the relationship, it doesn't have to be 2 weeks.

I stayed on for a month at my last employer.

I've seen people walked out of the building minutes after they gave notice.
 

CoolBrees

Veteran Starter
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
716
Reaction score
1,364
Age
44
Location
Portland, OR
Offline
If they don’t payout, take the final 12 days off, and on about 8 day notify them you won’t be returning if you like them. Day 12 if you don’t.

If they have approved the vacation then they are obligated to pay it out.

If they do pay out, notify them at lunch on your last day.

companies don’t give any information about former employees to other companies when they call regarding employment history. All they will say is the hire date, last work day and if you are eligible for rehire. You would be fine with the third, as you did nothing to deem you not eligible for rehire.
 

DCSaints_Fan

Hall-of-Famer
Joined
Mar 2, 2005
Messages
5,108
Reaction score
2,210
Location
San Jose, CA
Offline
Also, depending on the relationship, it doesn't have to be 2 weeks.

I stayed on for a month at my last employer.

I've seen people walked out of the building minutes after they gave notice.
Way I see it it’s what the employer would give you in case of a layoff.. If they wouldn’t give you anything, feel free to jump ship at a moments notice. If they give you some severance, only fair you give them sone time to make arrangements for your departure.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

Still P***ed at Yoko
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
25,255
Reaction score
15,313
Location
Between the Moon and New York City
Online
Unless, you're in California, where the laws are much more employee-friendly.




True dat.

With my last job in CA, i had pretty much checked out mentally for the last couple months i was there, and was just going through the motions, ‘phoning it in’ as it were.. normally i have/had more pride than that, but my boss was a jerk, so i didnt feel bad.. i had planned to quit shortly, but before i could, they terminated me- and on the spot, i was given like 5 or 6 different checks.. the HR lady was like, “And this is for your unpaid vacation, and this is your severance, and this is ….” on and on.. to the tune of like $10k ! .. I was shocked , but in the most pleasant way…. (This was several years ago, and it wasnt a great-paying job, so $10k was actually a decent amount of money).. Even that amount wasn’t worth what i had to put up with from my boss, but it didnt hurt…. I think it was partially so I would go away quietly , and not complain or sue or anything .. and partially just becuase of the laws there.. either way, it gave me a great head start into my next (current) career.
 

Mr. Blue Sky

Still P***ed at Yoko
VIP Contributor
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
25,255
Reaction score
15,313
Location
Between the Moon and New York City
Online
companies don’t give any information about former employees to other companies when they call regarding employment history. All they will say is the hire date, last work day and if you are eligible for rehire. You would be fine with the third, as you did nothing to deem you not eligible for rehire.


This is kinda true.. except (and if you work in HR, then correct me if I’m wrong)- but i thought they could ONLY ask the two questions: 1) Was he/she employed there and 2) What were the dates of employment …. I was under the impression that they couldn’t even ask if eligible for rehire, since most companies are so terrified of lawsuits that they dont even want to reveal that info… So i tell all my friends, if you’re interviewing with a company and they ask your salary history- you can literally name your own hourly/weekly/yearly wage, as long as it’s not way out of whack with the industry…. For instance, i have a buddy who has worked at airports for the last 11 or 12 years but has never made more than $15/hr.. i told him when applying for new jobs, definitely put AT LEAST $20 OR $22 per hour, becuase there’s little way for them to verify…. And in re to ‘eleigible for rehire’- even if they DO say, ‘No he is ineligible for rehire‘.. i dont know that a company you are interviewing with would make a decision not to hire you based on that, since they have no idea what went down at the last company.
 

Waymer

Waymer
Super Moderator
VIP Subscribing Member
Gold VIP Contributor
Joined
Sep 1, 1997
Messages
11,965
Reaction score
3,291
Offline
You earned that time through service. It isn't the company's. Keep that in mind. So either use it if you can't get paid, or if you can get paid for it and want money instead, then get paid. Do not just throw it away.
 

CoolBrees

Veteran Starter
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
716
Reaction score
1,364
Age
44
Location
Portland, OR
Offline
@Mr. Blue Sky

I believe that the list of “ineligible for rehire” is fairly well defined by the Department of Labor and not up to the whim of the HR Director.

I believe that “ineligible for rehire”includes - “for cause” events (drug use, fighting, egregious safety violation, harassment, etc), No Shows and some other pretty obvious offenses.

But just being fired and the fact that the company has no intention of ever hiring you again doesn’t mean you are “ineligible.”

This is why it is why anyone I know that hires people (including myself) aren’t going to move forward with someone who isn’t eligible for rehire. They did something…. Not great.

I agree with you re: opinions. I would never give a you know what even if the company rep did say something. I don’t know them from a can of paint; why would I take their opinion into consideration.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users who are viewing this thread

 

New Orleans Saints Twitter Feed

 

Headlines

Top Bottom