Taking Fire (Discovery Channel)

superchuck500

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This show premiers tonight. Through video taken by and narrated by the unit's members, it shows a platoon with the 101st Airborne in Pech Valley, Afghanistan assigned to hold control of a vital supply route between Kabul and Taliban safe havens in Pakistan. The series will span a year of action with the platoon.

Looks to be pretty intense and very interesting. Definitely a first of its kind, for a series.

EDIT - Just watched first episode. The last 10 minutes were powerful. God bless all of our men and women in harm's way.
 

Alan

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I give support to all that put themselves on the front line so that I can be a small individual "complaining" about something without being shot. I am afraid to watch the last 10 as I know enough about you that the story would invoke "genetic" empathy and make me break down and cry.

My question is...would YOU recommend it as an exercise in education...to my son?
 
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superchuck500

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I give support to all that put themselves on the front line so that I can be a small individual "complaining" about something without being shot. I am afraid to watch the last 10 as I know enough about you that the story would invoke "genetic" empathy and make me break down and cry.

My question is...would YOU recommend it as an exercise in education...to my son?


I never served so I cannot give a fully informed "recommendation" about the military experience for a young man. It is my impression, however, that it shouldn't be called an exercise in anything. If a young man goes in thinking it's for any other purpose than to serve his country at risk of his own life, he's probably misapprehending what he has undertaken.

I caveat that response by noting that it applies equally to young women (I was just answering the specific question about a son), and within the context of serving in a combat platoon . . . similar to what is seen in the series. There are, of course, many other functions in the military and in many ways, it does seem to be an excellent education for many young Americans growing up, getting training, serving their country, and then using that training in the workforce.
 

LOONEY

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I never served so I cannot give a fully informed "recommendation" about the military experience for a young man. It is my impression, however, that it shouldn't be called an exercise in anything. If a young man goes in thinking it's for any other purpose than to serve his country at risk of his own life, his probably misapprehending what he has undertaken.

I caveat that response by noting that it applies equally to young women (I was just answering the specific question about a son), and within the context of serving in a combat platoon . . . similar to what is seen in the series. There are, of course, many other functions in the military and in many ways, it does seem to be an excellent education for many young Americans growing up, getting training, serving their country, and then using that training in the workforce.


As a Veteran just wanted to say thank you Chuck your response was better then anything i could write, but you did capture what i was thinking.
 
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superchuck500

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As a Veteran just wanted to say thank you Chuck your response was better then anything i could write, but you did capture what i was thinking.


Thanks Looney, and thank you, again, for your service. I'm curious about something, maybe you could comment. I was watching this show last night and I texted my friend who saw combat in Iraq. We've had a few late night, alcohol-fueled discussions where he opened up about the experience and I know it was emotional on so many levels, including excitement and trauma, all rolled into one. I know he doesn't talk about it to many people but he felt comfortable talking to me for some reason.

But last night when I mentioned this show, he told me he hadn't heard of it. I was wondering if given his experience, would he even be interested in watching it, or is it the kind of thing that he lived and would just as well not spend time watching it on tv. I could see it both ways, but it would be easily understandable if he didn't have any interest. The best way I could relate to it would be Hurricane Katrina. I have watched very little about it and I just don't have any desire to.

He never responded.
 

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Thanks Looney, and thank you, again, for your service. I'm curious about something, maybe you could comment. I was watching this show last night and I texted my friend who saw combat in Iraq. We've had a few late night, alcohol-fueled discussions where he opened up about the experience and I know it was emotional on so many levels, including excitement and trauma, all rolled into one. I know he doesn't talk about it to many people but he felt comfortable talking to me for some reason.

But last night when I mentioned this show, he told me he hadn't heard of it. I was wondering if given his experience, would he even be interested in watching it, or is it the kind of thing that he lived and would just as well not spend time watching it on tv. I could see it both ways, but it would be easily understandable if he didn't have any interest. The best way I could relate to it would be Hurricane Katrina. I have watched very little about it and I just don't have any desire to.

He never responded.


I see where you going with this Chuck, I love war movies i grew up watching John Wayne and others, but some movies affect me more then others because they do feel to real and they can bring back those feelings we felt when overseas, Black Hawk down is one of these movies for me when i first saw it i left the theater covered in sweat. 13 hours was a good movie but i couldnt watch the combat scenes near the end, i bought it on dvd but have never finished it.
I think some movies or Tv shows can be spot on and can bring back those old feelings. Heck even watching Cops i find myself yelling at the Tv because its real . So i can understand your friend (while im not a afghan vet) plenty of my friends who i served with during the first gulf war are also afghan vets and they are the same way with certain movies, we could get togther watch the longest day with no issues , but other shows and movies my friends wont even discuss them.
So watching something like this new show maybe to hard for them to process due to the feelings and memories that start to flood back even after years of being removed from combat.

this is why you see police officers only being friends with other officers, veterans hanging out with other veterans, firemen hanging out with other firemen, its hard to share your memories and feeling with others who have never lived that experience. If i told some stories on this board or with my family they would never understand them. Im glad he is sharing his feelings and memories with you Chuck it shows what a good and trusted friend you are for him.
 

nolaspe

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Yeah, those last 10 min or so sucked from an emotional standpoint. Isn't this by the same ppl who did Restrepo? That's a documentary I really suggest to watch...

NSFW
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-DjqR6OucBc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

nolaspe

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Thanks Looney, and thank you, again, for your service. I'm curious about something, maybe you could comment. I was watching this show last night and I texted my friend who saw combat in Iraq. We've had a few late night, alcohol-fueled discussions where he opened up about the experience and I know it was emotional on so many levels, including excitement and trauma, all rolled into one. I know he doesn't talk about it to many people but he felt comfortable talking to me for some reason.

But last night when I mentioned this show, he told me he hadn't heard of it. I was wondering if given his experience, would he even be interested in watching it, or is it the kind of thing that he lived and would just as well not spend time watching it on tv. I could see it both ways, but it would be easily understandable if he didn't have any interest. The best way I could relate to it would be Hurricane Katrina. I have watched very little about it and I just don't have any desire to.

He never responded.

I actually texted an ex-Marine friend of mine (was in Iraq in '03, now NOPD/SWAT, and in some episodes of Nightwatch in a minor form of irony) about the show, first asking if he had Discovery. When he replied yes, I kinda went into some detail about the show too and said maybe he'd find it interesting, and all I got was crickets as well. I did tell him that as a non-Vet I wouldn't know how he thought about it, but I figured I'd tell him about the show anyway.
 

nolaspe

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I see where you going with this Chuck, I love war movies i grew up watching John Wayne and others, but some movies affect me more then others because they do feel to real and they can bring back those feelings we felt when overseas, Black Hawk down is one of these movies for me when i first saw it i left the theater covered in sweat. 13 hours was a good movie but i couldnt watch the combat scenes near the end, i bought it on dvd but have never finished it.
I think some movies or Tv shows can be spot on and can bring back those old feelings. Heck even watching Cops i find myself yelling at the Tv because its real . So i can understand your friend (while im not a afghan vet) plenty of my friends who i served with during the first gulf war are also afghan vets and they are the same way with certain movies, we could get togther watch the longest day with no issues , but other shows and movies my friends wont even discuss them.
So watching something like this new show maybe to hard for them to process due to the feelings and memories that start to flood back even after years of being removed from combat.

this is why you see police officers only being friends with other officers, veterans hanging out with other veterans, firemen hanging out with other firemen, its hard to share your memories and feeling with others who have never lived that experience. If i told some stories on this board or with my family they would never understand them. Im glad he is sharing his feelings and memories with you Chuck it shows what a good and trusted friend you are for him.

My uncle took his father in law who was at D-Day to see Saving Pvt Ryan in the theater when it came out. He lasted 10 min before he had to get out of there b/c of the flashbacks....
 

efil4stnias

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I never served so I cannot give a fully informed "recommendation" about the military experience for a young man. It is my impression, however, that it shouldn't be called an exercise in anything. If a young man goes in thinking it's for any other purpose than to serve his country at risk of his own life, he's probably misapprehending what he has undertaken.

I caveat that response by noting that it applies equally to young women (I was just answering the specific question about a son), and within the context of serving in a combat platoon . . . similar to what is seen in the series. There are, of course, many other functions in the military and in many ways, it does seem to be an excellent education for many young Americans growing up, getting training, serving their country, and then using that training in the workforce.

It worked for me. Taught me self-discipline and structure is needed. To realize potential and that with hard work, goals are attainable.

I needed that coming out of High School. I was extremely bright...but found that i could put in minimal effort to achieve what others had to work pretty hard to get ( grades ).

I joined in 1989...with the notion of never having to "serve" in war-time. About 90% of Echo Company were your run-of-the-mill midwestern boys looking for something. Be it what i needed, or just something to get out of the town they were stuck in, helping provide for family....so many different reasons. But what is truly amazing is that by the end of Basic Training, we were all on the same page. Didnt matter who was there for what reason. We became "brothers".

Im sure its probably a bit different today, but i would imaging the "psychology" behind it is still the same. They break you, then, over the course of Basic, mold you. Its actually pretty amazing as i have looked back over the years in just how successful it is. There are a few who drop out, cant handle the stresses, but for the most part, all succeed, graduate and move on to their specialized training ( AIT) after.

My rotation for Basic was the LAST rotation to roll thru Ft. Bliss in El Paso. The Army was shutting it down for Basic. So we caught absolute hell from the Drill Sgts and Drill Cadets ( West Point dudes looking to become Drill Sgts i guess - they were royal !@$@#$@#$#$$@# lol ) My platoons Drill Cadet had a "lazy eye" and of course, i made the mistake of looking at it in formation during his introduction.

I dont think the experience is for everyone, but for many a young boy, its learning how to be self-motivated, self disciplined and give 100% effort to achieve what it is you want to achieve. Thats the most enduring thing i took from Basic. And it served me quite well.

Then the call came in late summer of 89. Gulf War I. Everything about Basic changed in an instant. The demeanor, the training ....all of it. We were now faced with having to come to terms with "going to war". Drills were quite blunt, which in all honesty, scared me to death. First reaction is " ok this is all BS". Then your getting "overseas shots" and you are like " ok hold up...what?!?!?!" and you realize this is for real. So from that point on, you know the only thing thats going to be of use is every bit of training you get from the Drill instructors. Then you make sure the guy next to you is paying just as close attention as you are, because he may very well be the reason you live. A switch goes off...you begin to compartmentalize and your entire focus in basic becomes about gleaning as much as you can to ensure your surviveability.

Sheesh...looking back now- all i remember was standing in formation the day we were told that we were going to war and that training was now taking on a whole different aspect.

Yeah, joining the military today, these young men have to know exactly what they are signing up for.

and I dont know if thats a good thing or not. ( as opposed to my reasons, but then mid training, finding out we are going to war- ) dont know if focus is better one way or another.

Yeah god bless the young men and women of today that don the uniform and put their country first.
 

efil4stnias

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Hopefully they will re-run this ...i will watch.

I liked Outpost: Restrepo. Its a glimpse into what these young men face....days of absolute boredom followed by the most intense, stressful minutes/hrs during an operation or siege.

If you remember what you were doing at 21 or 22 or 23 years of age, then it puts it in perspective. Probably ALL of what they were doing during the "boredom" parts. None of what they had to deal with during the firefight parts. Having to go from making fun of a guy who just got a letter from his girlfriend to SNAFU/Cluster$%#$.

in an instant.
 
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superchuck500

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Hopefully they will re-run this ...i will watch.

I liked Outpost: Restrepo. Its a glimpse into what these young men face....days of absolute boredom followed by the most intense, stressful minutes/hrs during an operation or siege.

If you remember what you were doing at 21 or 22 or 23 years of age, then it puts it in perspective. Probably ALL of what they were doing during the "boredom" parts. None of what they had to deal with during the firefight parts. Having to go from making fun of a guy who just got a letter from his girlfriend to SNAFU/Cluster$%#$.

in an instant.


Taking Fire is a five-part series that just started - Episode 1 premiered Tuesday night but I'm sure Discovery will re-run it during the week (or weekend). The second episode will air next Tuesday (9pm CDT).

Here's a review of the show that places it in the context of Restrepo: ‘Taking Fire’ review: Worthy return to Afghanistan’s Korengal | Newsday
 

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