US shortage of skilled labor is worsening - requiring labor to be imported (1 Viewer)

superchuck500

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We hear politicians continue to talk jobs, jobs, jobs. Many critics refuse to accept the fairly rosy picture of less than 5 percent employment - and they point to the participation rate as the elephant in the room. It is not, however, as simple as matching up an unemployed person of working age with an available job; the employee must have the necessary skills and employers continue to carry large numbers of unfilled jobs.

So the true elephant in the room is that we have neglected education and training - there are hundreds of thousands of vacancies in nearly every sector . . . jobs that have not been filled because the applicants lack the necessary skills. The irony of this failure to educate and train our workforce is that it requires American employers to seek labor through legal immigration and the H2 Visa program.

Perhaps if we focused on improving education and workforce training, our participation rate would increase and no one would be worried about losing their job to an illegal immigrant - for which the average education is about 9th or 10th grade level.




American manufacturing is either on the cusp of a remarkable renaissance or in the throes of a long-term death spiral. And there’s plenty of data and anecdotal evidence to satisfy both views.

Although BCG generally sees the needle moving in the right direction, we’ve noted with concern the sharp slowdown in U.S. manufacturing productivity, which for years had been increasing at more than 4% per year, but now is moving in reverse, as the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) illustrates here.

We’ve also noted the need for skilled workers. According to BLS’s October 2016 Job Openings and Labor Turnover Summary (the so-called JOLTS report), released in December, the U.S. had approximately 322,000 manufacturing job vacancies.

The National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) sees the skilled labor shortage existing for years to come. NAM has projected that U.S. manufacturers will need an additional three-and-a-half million workers over the next 10 years; but more than half of these jobs—as many as two million—may go unfilled, NAM believes, because employers can’t find workers with the proper skills.
Forbes Welcome


While job growth in December disappointed and the unemployment rate got worse, the chief global strategist at JPMorgan Funds warned Friday that the U.S. labor force is running out of "well-qualified" American workers.

"We actually need more immigration," David Kelly told CNBC's "Squawk on the Street," calling into question any policies that restrict skilled immigrants from entering the U.S. to take jobs that can't be filled by the existing labor pool.

"We need these workers," he stressed. "We're almost out of well-qualified native-born workers."

Kelly said he's concerned by "signs of further restrictions on immigration in this country," obliquely addressing Donald Trump's tighter border security proposals, which received new attention after the president-elect tweeted about one of them Friday morning.
. . .
Politics aside, Kelly said, "One of the remarkable things about the labor market over the next 10 years is [that] around 85 percent of the new growth in the working-age population is going to have to come from immigrants, not from the native-born population."
The US is 'almost out' of qualified workers, and more immigration is the answer, JPMorgan strategist says
 

not2rich

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Wouldn't it be easier to force U.S. manufacturers to open new factories in the rural areas of the country that will give high-paying jobs to low-skilled workers?
 

varanook

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Not sure why we cant train the people we have here.

I see articles like this a lot. I work with a lot of "uneducated" folks that can be trained to do just about anything in a relatively short amount of time.
 

Saint_Ward

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Well, when a lot of companies stop training people and just try to hire people who can already do the job, you'll eventually run out.

Interestingly enough, it's usually government contractors and union jobs that train people up to eventually go from a gopher to a machinist to a welder. But you know.. unions bad... :jpshakehead:

I'd also imagine that vacancy stat is heavily misleading, and probably also accounting for degreed jobs, and lots of duplicates.

Companies are looking for people already trained, skilled, and often in things specific to their company.. so no wonder they can't find anyone.

If a company really needed something, they'd partner with a community college or their city/county/state to run some training sessions to graduate a small class, and pick from them to give them the jobs they're trying to fill.

But $$$, effort.. nope.
 

V Chip

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jobs that have not been filled because the applicants lack the necessary skills
AKA they don't meet the requirements for the job.

What are those requirements?

The typical ones for the job -- years of experience doing X, familiarity with Y, experience with XZ program/procedure/technique, education or training in ABC area -- and oh yeah, a salary 25-50% less than the going rate for those skills.

See? We cannot find someone who matches our requirements! Guess we have to import foreign workers who fit every one of those requirements, particularly the last one.
 

Taurus

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AKA they don't meet the requirements for the job.

What are those requirements?

The typical ones for the job -- years of experience doing X, familiarity with Y, experience with XZ program/procedure/technique, education or training in ABC area -- and oh yeah, a salary 25-50% less than the going rate for those skills.

See? We cannot find someone who matches our requirements! Guess we have to import foreign workers who fit every one of those requirements, particularly the last one.
QFT

We all, (left, right, centrist, liberal, libertarian) need to push back against this meme.

No, dear Forbes, we do not have a labor shortage. We have a training shortage. That's on you. Or do all Mexicans come with a welder's certification? And all Indians have an A+?

Stop lying to us and train Americans to do those jobs. Those coal miners are going to need something to do when they learn that Trump doesn't have a TARDIS.
 

Det. Brees

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Seems to me we are doing a poor job educating our people. We will sale education in useless degrees but no avaible jobs in that set field.
 

Saint_Ward

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Seems to me we are doing a poor job educating our people. We will sale education in useless degrees but no avaible jobs in that set field.
And ironically, a lot of jobs would be fine with any college degree, because just the fact you have one means you can finish things, you can learn, aka you're trainable.

But many people can learn how to do many skilled trades work, they just need a pathway of learning. Companies wait until Jon is 72 and retires before they start thinking about who will replace him.
 

staphory

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And ironically, a lot of jobs would be fine with any college degree, because just the fact you have one means you can finish things, you can learn, aka you're trainable.

But many people can learn how to do many skilled trades work, they just need a pathway of learning. Companies wait until Jon is 72 and retires before they start thinking about who will replace him.
My company does that. We are an aerospace company that maintains Navy training aircraft. They only hire people who have been through a military "A" school or have an A&P certificate and have been working in aviation sometime within the past five years. Problem is, Meridian MS is short on those people.
The company wants nothing to do with training anyone or creating an apprenticeship program or partnerships with local community colleges. Our union local is too small to do anything on its own. The local president approached the site manager about creating apprentice/helper positions (at much lower pay) to get some area natives trained but he refused to discuss it.
The average age of our workforce is around 56. They need to get some younger mechanics in but they don't have the corporate vision to do it.
 

Galbreath34

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Killing all the infrastructure and benefits unions offered out of greed has really come home to roost.
 

WhoDatPhan78

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AKA they don't meet the requirements for the job.

What are those requirements?

The typical ones for the job -- years of experience doing X, familiarity with Y, experience with XZ program/procedure/technique, education or training in ABC area -- and oh yeah, a salary 25-50% less than the going rate for those skills.

See? We cannot find someone who matches our requirements! Guess we have to import foreign workers who fit every one of those requirements, particularly the last one.
100% this.

There is no debate.

I'll just say laws were made to be abused, and there isn't enough discretion allowed to those enforcing the laws to effectively prevent the abuse.
 

saintmdterps

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We hear politicians continue to talk jobs, jobs, jobs. Many critics refuse to accept the fairly rosy picture of less than 5 percent employment - and they point to the participation rate as the elephant in the room. It is not, however, as simple as matching up an unemployed person of working age with an available job; the employee must have the necessary skills and employers continue to carry large numbers of unfilled jobs.

So the true elephant in the room is that we have neglected education and training - there are hundreds of thousands of vacancies in nearly every sector . . . jobs that have not been filled because the applicants lack the necessary skills. The irony of this failure to educate and train our workforce is that it requires American employers to seek labor through legal immigration and the H2 Visa program.

Perhaps if we focused on improving education and workforce training, our participation rate would increase and no one would be worried about losing their job to an illegal immigrant - for which the average education is about 9th or 10th grade level.






Forbes Welcome




The US is 'almost out' of qualified workers, and more immigration is the answer, JPMorgan strategist says
For those who may be interested, there is still a shortage in many areas of the country, especically rural, of occupational and physical therapy assisitants (COTA/L and PTA). The programs are 2.5 years and can be found at many community colleges where tuition is much lower. Starting salaries are in the $26-28/hr range, healthcare being one of the few areas where salaries are typically given as per hour and not annual. 27.00/hr = 56,160/yr, not bad for a 2.5 year degree.

Many full OT's and PT's have said they'd forego the salary difference, skip the 2-3 years of grad school with its attendant student loans, and just get their PTA or COTA licensure.

I understand there is also a shortage of welders and truck drivers just to name a few other professions where extensive and expensive schooling isn't necessary.
 

saintmdterps

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Well, when a lot of companies stop training people and just try to hire people who can already do the job, you'll eventually run out.

Interestingly enough, it's usually government contractors and union jobs that train people up to eventually go from a gopher to a machinist to a welder. But you know.. unions bad... :jpshakehead:

I'd also imagine that vacancy stat is heavily misleading, and probably also accounting for degreed jobs, and lots of duplicates.

Companies are looking for people already trained, skilled, and often in things specific to their company.. so no wonder they can't find anyone.

If a company really needed something, they'd partner with a community college or their city/county/state to run some training sessions to graduate a small class, and pick from them to give them the jobs they're trying to fill.

But $$$, effort.. nope.
I'm not sure if it's still true but many unions had their own training programs. You signed on as apprentice, moved up to journeyman, then to master. This was true for plumbers, welders, steamfitters, and even carpenters.

As you say, unions bad, put folks out of work, destroy companies, ruin country :jpshakehead:
 

Stealth Matrix

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Raising an entire generation or two to believe that they can't possibly become anything worthwhile without expensive college education is doing a bit of damage too. Everyone wants that desk job with the company truck from the get-go.
 

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