What do you collect? (1 Viewer)

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Anyone else collect a lot of crap?
I've got a bunch - Lots of Saints/sports memorabilia, stamps/coins, bobbleheads, ticket stubs, you name it.

Lately I've been collecting growlers from different breweries. (Started as more of a drinking habit but then they start piling up)

Also shown, very small part of the sports memorabilia collection. (next post)
 

Joe OKC

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Figured I would post something a little cooler this time.

Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife... aka.. The British Commando Dagger.



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This thing is Razor Sharp... The thinness of the blade was designed for better penetration through the ribcage. This is a quote from the designer. It is essential that the blade have a sharp stabbing point and good cutting edges, because an artery torn through (as against a clean cut) tends to contract and stop the bleeding. If a main artery is cleanly severed, the wounded man will quickly lose consciousness and die.

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This is also a Third Pattern knife... The first two designs had smooth handles, but after complaints that they became hard to handle after being soaked in blood, they latter designed the grip with the ringed style handles for better grip.


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The F-S fighting knife was made famous during World War II when issued to British Commandos, the Airborne Forces, the SAS and many other units, especially for the Normandy landings in June 1944.

Here is the knife pictured in Training exercises. Notice the soldier getting stabbed has one in his leg pocket... That one is a first pattern with smoother diamond edged handle.

The leather sheath would actually sometimes be sewn into their uniform for quick and easy access.

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The length of the blade was chosen to give several inches of blade to penetrate the body after passing through the 3 in (7.6 cm) of the thickest clothing that was anticipated to be worn in the war, namely that of Soviet greatcoats. Later production runs of the F-S fighting knife have a blade length that is about 7.5 in (19 cm).

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Joe OKC

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I posted this once somewhere else... I am doing it again since I already have the picture and I wanted to put it on this thread... Another Home Front Item... a Button...

There are more items to go...

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button 2.jpg

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Joe OKC

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Although this item was produced before WWI... It is a WWII item as it was used in WWII as well... This one really speaks for itself...

Bugle and Trumpet Calls for The British Army 1906

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You

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I have a collection of mardi gras memorabelia back to 1850. Also some Louisiana artwork and books written by Louisiana authors.
I also have some civil war collections: knives, swords. Would like some guns, letters or clothing.
Also collect maritime artifacts. I have a Small collection of sports memorabelia.
 
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Dago

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I will be dogged... I have been thinking about making this very thread...

I collect WWII items and I have been thinking about showing this collection here on SR.com. I have one bedroom here that is an actual little museum...

Would anyone like to actually like see this collection?
looked at the stuff you posted....very interesting
my father is a WWII buff (especially the Pacific Theater) and collects stuff along with what we give him
he has a mint condition working artillery timer, cruise books, die cast aircraft, etc

I actually found a sterling silver ring from a crew member from the CV2 USS Lexington which is his favorite ship.
 

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I have a pretty big gun collection. It ranges from a World War 2 Era 1911 to a just purchased Beretta 92. Most of my collect is 1911 style guns, but I have several others. Over the Last 20 years I built my collection to 53 handguns and 8 Rifles. I just love fooling with them, cleaning them. And taking them apart. They are really works of Art and I’m fascinated with the different design of each. That is almost as fun as going to the range and shooting them.
 

Joe OKC

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Now that Lent is over and My good old Buddy @guidomerkinsrules is back with us again I can post on this thread... I wouldn't want him to miss anything...

WWII Item.... sort of.. But known as a Period item... an item from that period although not necessarily War related.

Ticket Stub to The Red River Rivalry Football game Between OU and Texas.
Oct 9. 1943
OU lost 7-13
Coach - Dewey William "Snorter" Luster University of Oklahoma from 1941 to 1945, compiling a career college football coaching record of 32–22–4.
Ticket Cost - $2.50

In the six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, nearly 60 Sooner athletes in all sports had enlisted in some branch of the armed services and more continued to enlist as the war progressed.

114479

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Joe OKC

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First off, I am going to try and merge all my posts into one thread only... I will try that later. Now on to today's WWII Item.

These were manufactured by a bunch of different companies back then. Of course by your regular card manufacturing companies and then like this one for the advertising specialty.

and what turned out to be just showing another WWII item from my collection actually turning into a history lesson for me. I will post the pictures of the item.. and then go into the little history that I learned today. These items pretty Much Speak for themselves...

Aircraft spotter Cards from Coca-Cola. 1943... But other card makers produced them themselves. I actually have a couple different decks. The cards that I picked were at random.

But the bottom line is that for the Men and Women overseas in WWII there was a lot of idle time, and a lot of boredom. These cards were created in an effort that as the men were playing card games with these cards during that idle time, it would possibly help with identification of enemy and friendly aircraft. This Technique was also used in our Gulf Wars as well with the Iraqi Most wanted playing cards.

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german bomber.jpgQueen of spades.jpgjap bomber.jpg


In the making of this post I learned a lot more about Coca-Cola in WWII... From some of the history sights.

In 1941, longtime Coca-Cola leader Robert Woodruff said that any person in uniform should get a bottle of Coke for 5 cents, wherever he is and whatever it costs the Company.

During WWII, a special group of Coca-Colaemployees called Technical Observers were asked to fulfill Woodruff's promise. The "TOs" supervised the shipment and operation of 64 complete bottling plants that distributed over 5 billion bottles of Coca-Cola to servicemen and women.

One hundred forty-eight men served as TOs, compete with Army officer's rank, pay and uniforms that had a unique identification patch. Two TOs were killed in the line of duty.

Providing Coke to troops in remote areas of the South Pacific posed one of the most difficult problems to the TOs. The Brisbane, Australia, bottler offered one solution to the problem when he re-commssioned a portable soda fountain that had been used at drugstore conventions and had it flown into the hills to quench the thirsts of B-26 pilots. It was so successful that the Army requested a hundred more immediately.

Technicians from the Coca-Cola Export Corporation, working with the Liquid Carbonic and Hussman-Ligonier Companies, quickly developed a portable dispensing unit know as a "jungle fountain." Combining a standard Junior Dole Dispenser with an ice-making machine, the unit could be easily transported by truck to any location.



Here is coca-cola being delivered to Front Line troops in Italy. I think that the expression on their faces says it all.

"Soldiers of the 133rd F.A. BN. BTRY C of the 36th Div. dug in on the front lines near San Michele, Italy, 2 March 1944, get their first Coca-Cola in over a year. Drinking a “Coke” is Pvt Norman A Martin of Detroit, MI. Passing them on downto the men in the gun position are Pvt John L. Hill of Louisville, KY, and Pfc Roy F. Jones of Marshall, TX." (U.S. Army Photo Courtesy of Dwight D. Eisenhower Library)

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Marines in the Pacific.

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Naval SeaBees Refrigeration Unit in the Pacific.

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and this little bit...


During World War II, America shipped an entire Coca-Cola bottling factory overseas so that our fighting soldiers could enjoy the Real Thing. We did this more than once, in both the European and Pacific theaters of war. It all began in 1943. That's when General Dwight Eisenhower (who grew up in Abilene!) decided he wanted to make the iconic American soda available to his soldiers as close to the battle front as possible.

While commanding troops in North Africa, Ike sent a message to his boss, Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall, requesting 3 million bottles of Coke. He also requested the equipment and supplies needed to wash, refill, bottle and cap six million more bottles worth of Coke each month. Ike's boss approved the request and the Coca-Cola Company was happy to help out. The company essentially put together an entire bottling facility and shipped it to Eisenhower's troops.



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and from Bill Mauldin. Cartoonist with the 45th Infantry Division.

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I haven't been drinking soft drinks in years.. But today I think that I may just run out and have me a Coca-Cola.

Joe
 
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Yoweigh

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I work at a school getting ready to demolish its old science building, and nothing in there is inventoried or has any kind of paper trail. I found unopened boxes of PYREX (all caps) test tubes, petri dishes, flasks, beakers, bulbs, bell jars, all sorts of glassware. Cold gas discharge tubes with power supples. Pressurized cylinders of hazardous gasses. A Laserdisc player!!! Triple balance scale, microscope, vacuum pump... I pretty much have a science lab at home now. My wife hates it!

I also found a radioactive bucket but left that one there. It's going to cost the school $20K just to get rid of it!
 

Joe OKC

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In Honor of D-Day June 6th, 1944. The 75th Anniversary.

This is one of my prized pieces.

Normandy Invasion Map

I picked this piece up with the story that it came from an estate sale in Canada. If you notice how the map was originally folded you can see how the beach invasion areas of the map are darken with dirt and how the man actually carried the map. The area that he mainly used clearly shows Juno Beach where the 3rd Canadian Division landed.

The invasion area was 50 miles wide.

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Utah Beach and the St. Mere Eglise area.


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