What do you collect? (1 Viewer)

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Anyone else collect a lot of crap?
I've got a bunch - Lots of Saints/sports memorabilia, stamps/coins, bobbleheads, ticket stubs, you name it.

Lately I've been collecting growlers from different breweries. (Started as more of a drinking habit but then they start piling up)

Also shown, very small part of the sports memorabilia collection. (next post)
 

Joe OKC

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This is actually a re-post of sorts.. But in Honor of D-Day's 75th Anniversary.

This ship was at Normandy on June 6th.

USS Henrico

USSHenricoAPA45 (1).jpg

Normandy invasion[edit]
Henrico embarked her invasion troops on 26 May at Portland, England, and sailed on 5 June as a part of Rear Admiral John Hall's Omaha Beach Assault Force. On the following day, 6 June, Henrico landed her troops, the 16th Regiment of the First Infantry Division,[3] in the first assault wave on the Easy Red Sector of Omaha Beach in the face of heavy seas and strong enemy fortifications. As the tempo of fighting increased, the ship received casualties from the beaches, returning to Portland later on "D-Day." As the assault area was secured and the advance began, Henrico stood by for shuttle duty, finally sailing for the Firth of Clyde on 19 June.

Anyways...

Henrico's Christmas Day Menu 6 months before the invasion.


Henrico Menu 1.jpg


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Joe OKC

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This is my latest pickup.. and I also have a reason for posting it now, that I may or may reveal at a later date.

WWII Item of the Week... Japanese "Good Luck" Flag. -yosegaki hinomaru.
Now I am no expert on these but the big question is: "Is this real or not."
During WWII these flag were given to the soldiers when they were drafted into the army. Did you have to be just drafted, I don;t know. But the flag was to be carried in the pockets of the soldiers. Most of them tied them to their guns.
It became a tradition for the family and friends to write on a soldiers flag statements of Good Luck, well Wishes, stay safe etc on these flags. The majority of them that you see have this writing on them. I would say about 75%. The writing also went out like sun rays most time.
But, some of the flags did not have writing on them as seen by the other pictures I am posting...
After the war was over, people in Japan would still make these flags and write on them to sell to troops that were wanting war souvenirs as they were occupying Japan. Therefore it makes it extremely difficult to tell the During the war vs, post war flags.
Heck they would write "Die American" and we would never know unless we read Japanese haha.
But anyways, just trying to decide if this is an actual piece from WWII or a post war copy is the question. And this is also a fun part of collecting this stuff.
So we are going to look at this piece real quick.
1. It's pretty Old. You can tell by the moth holes that it has some age to it.
2. The leather corners are still on the flag. There was no cost cutting by a defeated nation there.
3. There is NO fancy writings on it. This was used to the extra WOW and sales factor.
4. The Flag ties on the ends used to tie the flag to something have been "CUT". As if the person who took it had cut it off something.
5. There is machine stitching of the Flag.
6. It was purchased from a renowned dealer.
The person that carried this may have not been in a combat unit. He may have not gotten back home to have his family and friends sign it. We will never know.
None of these things will actually allow me to date this flag to say it was a Pre-war, Mid-war or Post-War manufacture. But given these factors that I stated above. I do believe that there is a 60% chance or more that this is an actually Mid-War Flag and not a post war manufacture.
Anyways.. Thanks all....



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zeetes

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i know i have posted in here, not sure if i disclosed my love for lock picking. fork yeah.

i have a lot of older locks; german, russian, european (lol), and a few oddballs.

much cooler than looking at boat pictures.
 

Joe OKC

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I am really proud of this little piece... Most of my WWII collection has a theme of Christmas, Music, Food and Oklahoma. If that makes sense. But this very small piece is such a huge statement.

You Navy guys could explain what this is better than I could. But the bottom line it is used as money aboard ship.

Oklahoma Chit.jpg


Thing that really makes it unique and or valuable, is that the USS Oklahoma was sunk and capsized on December 7, 1941 in the Attack at Pearl Harbor with 429 Men lost after taking 5 torpedos in the attack.

It took over 15 months but the ship was uprighted, and all her armament salvaged.

After WWII she was being hauled from Oahu to California shipyard, she sank in a storm about 500 miles east of Hawaii and her whereabouts are unknown today.









USS Oklahoma (BB-37) was a Nevada-class battleship built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation for the United States Navy in 1910, notable for being the first American class of oil-burning dreadnoughts.

Commissioned in 1916, Oklahoma served in World War I as a part of Battleship Division Six, protecting Allied convoys on their way across the Atlantic. After the war, she served in both the United States Battle Fleet and Scouting Fleet. Oklahoma was modernized between 1927 and 1929. In 1936, she rescued American citizens and refugees from the Spanish Civil War. On returning to the West Coast in August of the same year, Oklahoma spent the rest of her service in the Pacific.

On 7 December 1941, Oklahoma was sunk by several torpedoes during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Torpedoes from torpedo bomber airplanes hit the Oklahoma's hull and the ship capsized. A total of 429 crew died; survivors jumped off the ship 50 feet (15 m) into burning hot water or crawled across mooring lines that connected Oklahoma and Maryland. Some sailors inside escaped when rescuers drilled holes and opened hatches to rescue them. In 1943, Oklahomawas righted and salvaged. Unlike most of the other battleships that were recovered following Pearl Harbor, Oklahoma was too damaged to return to duty. Her wreck was eventually stripped of her remaining armament and superstructure before being sold for scrap in 1946. The hulk sank in a storm in 1947, while being towed from Oahu, Hawaii, to a breakers yard in San Francisco Bay.
 
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Dago

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just found a great Christmas gift for my dad. His favorite plane from WWII was the F4U Corsair

This is a squadron book for Wright's Raiders and it is signed by most of the members

s-l500 (1).jpg

s-l500 (2).jpg
 

Joe OKC

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just found a great Christmas gift for my dad. His favorite plane from WWII was the F4U Corsair

This is a squadron book for Wright's Raiders and it is signed by most of the members

s-l500 (1).jpg

s-l500 (2).jpg
Dude.. That is Nice... Signed pieces are some of the best... and give increased value. Nice find... I just won off ebay a small 1943 Calendar from an Insurance company in Missouri.. Little things...
 
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Joe OKC

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I might as well go ahead and add this piece. I have had it for a few years...

US Army Signal Corp Pigeon Carrier. It carried two pigeons into battle along with a top containment area for the pigeon supplies like Feed, Message capsules and message book...

good photo.jpg

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backside.jpg

The bottle of beer is just to show scale.

beer scale.jpg




I lost an ebay bidding war on a letter home by a soldier that worked for the pigeon corp... It went for over $50.. But I wish I had stayed in the bidding now... The soldier writes home to his wife and says.. "They race the pigeons regular and have wagers on them... and every now and then an officer will come up and bet on a pigeon. Boy" he says: "When an officer tell you that you better win... You better win or you'll be doing extra duty."
I wish that I had won the letter...

anyways.. This is about all the I know about the US Army Pigeon Corp.

--------------------------------

The United States Army Pigeon Service (a.k.a. Signal Pigeon Corps) was a unit of the United States Army during World War I and World War II. Their assignment was the training and usage of homing pigeons for communication and reconnaissance purposes.[1]

During World War II, the force consisted of 3,150 soldiers and 54,000 war pigeons, which were considered an undetectable method of communication. Over 90% of US Army messages sent by pigeons were received.[2]

During the Italian Campaign of World War II, G.I. Joe was a pigeon who saved the lives of the inhabitants of the village of Calvi Vecchia, Italy, and of the British troops of 56th (London) Infantry Division occupying it. Air support had been requested against German positions at Calvi Vecchia on 18 October 1943, but the message that the 169th (London) Infantry Brigade had captured the village, delivered by G.I. Joe, arrived just in time to avoid the bombing. G.I. Joe flew this 20-mile distance in an impressive 20 minutes, just as the planes were preparing to take off for the target. He saved a thousand men.

For his efforts, G.I. Joe was presented the Dickin Medal for "the most outstanding flight made by a United States Army pigeon in World War II."[5]


By the beginning of World War 2, the U.S. Army had approximately 54,000 pigeons working under the Signal Pigeon Corps. As these birds became more frequently used over the course of the war, the U.S. Army Veterinary Service had to dedicate a unit to "the protection of pigeon health, the preservation of their physical efficiency, and the safeguard against introducing or disseminating pigeon-borne diseases affecting other animals and the human being."[8]

These objectives were obtained by furnishing professional services and supervisory assistance in the care, feeding, housing, and transporting of pigeons; conducting laboratory diagnostic and investigative studies on pigeon diseases; establishing controls against the diseases of pigeons by quarantine procedures; inspecting and reporting on factors having a bearing on pigeon health; and giving technical assistance in the training of pigeoneers. Although 36,000 pigeons were deployed overseas, the foregoing veterinary services were not practiced uniformly in all of the theaters and oversea areas because of the newness in the concept of military veterinary medicine for the Army Pigeon Service.





pigeon Cartoon.jpg
 

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Joe OKC

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This came in the mail today... measures about 11" x 16".. Has all the months in it..

1943 Calendar.jpg


That said... I can see that i should be wasting any more time on this thread.
 

Marty_Graw

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Cool piece. Any explanation as to the little red #'s under the larger #'s? Is it just a count of the days of the year? For example, does Feb 1st have a "32" under it?

And, finally, what # does 3-28 have under it? I don't feel up to doing the math...
 

Dago

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i know i have posted in here, not sure if i disclosed my love for lock picking. fork yeah.

i have a lot of older locks; german, russian, european (lol), and a few oddballs.

much cooler than looking at boat pictures.
yeah I am never gonna let you know where I live
 
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I will be dogged... I have been thinking about making this very thread...

I collect WWII items and I have been thinking about showing this collection here on SR.com. I have one bedroom here that is an actual little museum...

Would anyone like to actually like see this collection?
Yes l would please
 

Joe OKC

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Cool piece. Any explanation as to the little red #'s under the larger #'s? Is it just a count of the days of the year? For example, does Feb 1st have a "32" under it?

And, finally, what # does 3-28 have under it? I don't feel up to doing the math...
Thanks for the reply...

3-28 #87

You are correct. It's the number of the day in the year... My mothers Birthday is Saturday 3-13-43 , day # 72.. 1st QTR. Moon... just so ya know...

1943 Calendar 2 a.jpg
 

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