What y’all eatin’ - Coronavirus edition (1 Viewer)

gummbo70114

Pro-Bowler
Joined
Dec 1, 2006
Messages
1,948
Reaction score
2,344
Age
62
Location
In the o.c.
Online
Thanks for kicking it up a notch. Not sure why, but never appreciated the taste of olives, although I like olive oil.

1603547858963.png

I bought some Vega chocolate protein power and it is helping me to forget about ice cream.
Never thought of that, since I’ve never met a food I didn’t like I’m not always alert to the fact that some people may not like olives. For some reason the salty taste of the olives and the avocado go well together on my pallet.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
1,607
Reaction score
1,251
Location
Florida
Online
Never thought of that, since I’ve never met a food I didn’t like I’m not always alert to the fact that some people may not like olives. For some reason the brain a taste of the olives and the avocado go well together on my pallet.
That's great that you like all foods. You get to be a polite house guest! Will you eat Brussel Sprouts?

The processing of olives and why some may have a reason of not liking olives.

https://www.mic.com/p/if-you-hate-olives-there-could-be-a-good-reason-why-16329785

"So what makes olives so unappealing? Blame it on the processing. When they're freshly picked from the tree, unripe olives are inedible. The taste is so astringent that even the most bitter lover would have trouble getting them down. This pungent flavor is caused by a chemical called oleuropein, which is both unpalatable and a powerful antioxidant that could have cancer-fighting effects. Go figure.

Table olives have to be processed to remove some of that bitterness. Traditional methods use salt and spices, but the most popular way uses the power of sodium hydroxide, also known as lye.

A nice, cold chemical bath. Lye, as anyone who watched Fight Club will remember, is a powerful chemical used in everything from industrial cleaning to drain openers. As a caustic chemical, lye is described by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry as "strongly irritating and corrosive." At certain levels, it can be extremely dangerous, potentially causing severe burns or respiratory damage. Luckily, lower levels have been deemed safe enough by the Food and Drug Administration to go in our food, as long as it's done right".
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2019
Messages
1,607
Reaction score
1,251
Location
Florida
Online
I like Brussells sprouts.

And lye isn't as terrible as it sounds. Lots of things are processed with alkalines, like bagels and pretzels.
But I like bagels! Don't say anything bad about them, I will go into withdrawal. haha

The Brussell Sprouts farming community thanks you.

1603555469858.png
 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
33,043
Reaction score
20,835
Age
49
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
I like Brussells sprouts.

And lye isn't as terrible as it sounds. Lots of things are processed with alkalines, like bagels and pretzels.
My wife has been grilling Brussel sprouts lately and adding it to whatever food we eat. She seasons them a bit and they're actually pretty good.
 

Marty_Graw

Don't Rain on My Parade
Joined
Mar 22, 2006
Messages
3,705
Reaction score
5,026
Location
Conjunction Junction
Offline
I often grill them in a foil packet with bacon scraps, shallots, salt, pepper and olive oil. Usually halve or quarter them, depending on their size.

Tastes great and takes all the healthiness right out of them. Still leaves you a bit gassy the next day, though.
 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
33,043
Reaction score
20,835
Age
49
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
I often grill them in a foil packet with bacon scraps, shallots, salt, pepper and olive oil. Usually halve or quarter them, depending on their size.

Tastes great and takes all the healthiness right out of them. Still leaves you a bit gassy the next day, though.
Yeah. Halving them here.
 

gummbo70114

Pro-Bowler
Joined
Dec 1, 2006
Messages
1,948
Reaction score
2,344
Age
62
Location
In the o.c.
Online
That's great that you like all foods. You get to be a polite house guest! Will you eat Brussel Sprouts?

The processing of olives and why some may have a reason of not liking olives.

https://www.mic.com/p/if-you-hate-olives-there-could-be-a-good-reason-why-16329785

"So what makes olives so unappealing? Blame it on the processing. When they're freshly picked from the tree, unripe olives are inedible. The taste is so astringent that even the most bitter lover would have trouble getting them down. This pungent flavor is caused by a chemical called oleuropein, which is both unpalatable and a powerful antioxidant that could have cancer-fighting effects. Go figure.

Table olives have to be processed to remove some of that bitterness. Traditional methods use salt and spices, but the most popular way uses the power of sodium hydroxide, also known as lye.

A nice, cold chemical bath. Lye, as anyone who watched Fight Club will remember, is a powerful chemical used in everything from industrial cleaning to drain openers. As a caustic chemical, lye is described by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry as "strongly irritating and corrosive." At certain levels, it can be extremely dangerous, potentially causing severe burns or respiratory damage. Luckily, lower levels have been deemed safe enough by the Food and Drug Administration to go in our food, as long as it's done right".
Sounds delicious
 

buzd

party lamp
Staff member
Tech-Admin
Joined
Jan 11, 2002
Messages
32,911
Reaction score
27,106
Location
Duncan Plaza
Online
Yeah. Halving them here.
Half them, and cook them cut side down in an iron skillet with just a touch of oil, so that the cut side chars a little. Then throw them in the oven for 10 or 15 minutes with your seasoning of choice - I have an IPA (like the beer) seasoning that is really good on vegetables.
 

sfidc3

Pro-Bowler
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
3,128
Reaction score
3,538
Offline
I like Brussells sprouts.

And lye isn't as terrible as it sounds. Lots of things are processed with alkalines, like bagels and pretzels.
Hated them growing up, always the mushy, sour, can version.

Was at my friend's brothers 50th party at his house and he made oven roasted brussels with a bit of bacon and spring onion with cajun spice, I couldn't believe how much I liked them. They in no way resembled or tasted like the crap in the can....
 

DaveXA

I love the Lord!
Staff member
Super Moderator
Joined
Sep 6, 2001
Messages
33,043
Reaction score
20,835
Age
49
Location
Vienna, VA via Lafayette
Offline
Half them, and cook them cut side down in an iron skillet with just a touch of oil, so that the cut side chars a little. Then throw them in the oven for 10 or 15 minutes with your seasoning of choice - I have an IPA (like the beer) seasoning that is really good on vegetables.
Yeah, similar here, using a regular skillet though. Wife hates using the cast iron because it's too heavy for her. Cast iron does cook better and more even heat, but it's not a huge difference.
 

buzd

party lamp
Staff member
Tech-Admin
Joined
Jan 11, 2002
Messages
32,911
Reaction score
27,106
Location
Duncan Plaza
Online
Hated them growing up, always the mushy, sour, can version.

Was at my friend's brothers 50th party at his house and he made oven roasted brussels with a bit of bacon and spring onion with cajun spice, I couldn't believe how much I liked them. They in no way resembled or tasted like the crap in the can....
That story is the same for me with most vegetables. Brussels spouts, asparagus, beets, spinach - we had the nasty can versions of all of them. It wasn’t really until I was an adult that I realized how good fresh vegetables are.
 

buzd

party lamp
Staff member
Tech-Admin
Joined
Jan 11, 2002
Messages
32,911
Reaction score
27,106
Location
Duncan Plaza
Online
Yeah, similar here, using a regular skillet though. Wife hates using the cast iron because it's too heavy for her. Cast iron does cook better and more even heat, but it's not a huge difference.
Nothing wrong with a skillet. Our cast iron just lives on the stove.
 

sfidc3

Pro-Bowler
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
3,128
Reaction score
3,538
Offline
That story is the same for me with most vegetables. Brussels spouts, asparagus, beets, spinach - we had the nasty can versions of all of them. It wasn’t really until I was an adult that I realized how good fresh vegetables are.
With you on asparagus and spinach but will never like beets or broccoli....wish I did as both are good for you....
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Similar threads



Headlines

Top Bottom