Why No Threads about Mansanto? (1 Viewer)

MrEMann83

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With the Mansanto protection act being passed and all.

I've heard some really bad stuff about this company, but as is par for the course, I am not sure which is propaganda, and which is true.

What say you?
 

ianm892

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It's terrible, they basically force farmers to use their seeds, it's sick, I can't believe they let them do this, gunna be interesting to say the least, the food industry is the reason we're extremely fat, all processed food diets
 

Galbreath34

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The only good thing about Monsanto is that they aren't ADM. That's not saying much.
 

tjharris

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GMO produce causes cancer and makes lab rats sterile.
Also, GMO produce has all infertile seeds.
 

IntenseSaint

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They have both republicans and democrats in their back pockets. So the sheep that follow each side won't raise a stink about them either.
 

Goatman Saint

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From what I have read the biggest issue is not the genetic manipulation as much as what is done to the plants themselves. The one area I have an issue with is where the plants are immune to Roundup. Plants are then sprayed routinely with Roundup to keep the fields weed free. The toxic residue from the Roundup then is present in many of the things we eat. This the interferes with mammalian fetal development.

studies show that glyphosate acts as a disruptor of mammalian cytochrome P450 aromatase activity from concentrations 100 times lower than the recommended use in agriculture; this is noticeable on human placental cells after only 18 hr, and it can also affect aromatase gene expression. It also partially disrupts the ubiquitous reductase activity but at higher concentrations. Its effects are allowed and amplified by at least 0.02% of the adjuvants present in Roundup, known to facilitate cell penetration, and this should be carefully taken into account in pesticide evaluation. The dilution of glyphosate in Roundup formulation may multiply its endocrine effect. Roundup may be thus considered as a potential endocrine disruptor. Moreover, at higher doses still below the classical agricultural dilutions, its toxicity on placental cells could induce some reproduction problems. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1257596/.

More good stuff on potential cancer link due to disruption in cell division.
http://www.biosafety-info.net/article.php?aid=267

There is a lot more where those came from.
 
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MrEMann83

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So we've got Andy G saying one thing, and Dave saying another. Both sound highly plausible. This is why it's hard to figure out.
 

HJBandME

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From what I have read the biggest issue is not the genetic manipulation as much as what is done to the plants themselves. The one area I have an issue with is where the plants are immune to Roundup. Plants are then sprayed routinely with Roundup to keep the fields weed free. The toxic residue from the Roundup then is present in many of the things we eat. This the interferes with mammalian fetal development.

studies show that glyphosate acts as a disruptor of mammalian cytochrome P450 aromatase activity from concentrations 100 times lower than the recommended use in agriculture; this is noticeable on human placental cells after only 18 hr, and it can also affect aromatase gene expression. It also partially disrupts the ubiquitous reductase activity but at higher concentrations. Its effects are allowed and amplified by at least 0.02% of the adjuvants present in Roundup, known to facilitate cell penetration, and this should be carefully taken into account in pesticide evaluation. The dilution of glyphosate in Roundup formulation may multiply its endocrine effect. Roundup may be thus considered as a potential endocrine disruptor. Moreover, at higher doses still below the classical agricultural dilutions, its toxicity on placental cells could induce some reproduction problems. Differential Effects of Glyphosate and Roundup on Human Placental Cells and Aromatase.

More good stuff on potential cancer link due to disruption in cell division.
Biosafety Information Centre

There is a lot more where those came from.
Thanks, Dave!

What say Ye, Andy G?
 

JimEverett

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Its amazing how people get worked up over things without really reading them.

I just searched for a few minutes to try and find the actual language of the rider or riders in question and could not find them.
Its just a ton of "reporting" on the fears of the riders.

Anyone actually read it? Anyone know where to find without reading thousands and thousands of pages?
 

Galbreath34

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Full Text of H.R. 933: Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013 - GovTrack.us

Sec 735, just search for 735 and it's the only hit.

Here it is though:

Sec. 735. In the event that a determination of non-regulated status made pursuant to section 411 of the Plant Protection Act is or has been invalidated or vacated, the Secretary of Agriculture shall, notwithstanding any other provision of law, upon request by a farmer, grower, farm operator, or producer, immediately grant temporary permit(s) or temporary deregulation in part, subject to necessary and appropriate conditions consistent with section 411(a) or 412(c) of the Plant Protection Act, which interim conditions shall authorize the movement, introduction, continued cultivation, commercialization and other specifically enumerated activities and requirements, including measures designed to mitigate or minimize potential adverse environmental effects, if any, relevant to the Secretary’s evaluation of the petition for non-regulated status, while ensuring that growers or other users are able to move, plant, cultivate, introduce into commerce and carry out other authorized activities in a timely manner: Provided, That all such conditions shall be applicable only for the interim period necessary for the Secretary to complete any required analyses or consultations related to the petition for non-regulated status: Provided further, That nothing in this section shall be construed as limiting the Secretary’s authority under section 411, 412 and 414 of the Plant Protection Act.
Bold mine. The thrust is that any producer requesting that they use any seeds/products already deemed illegal MUST be granted an immediate temporary ability to plant it anyway until the USDA can jump through some hoops to redetermine what they already determined.

It basically says that even if the USDA issues a ruling, they can't enforce it for at least another growing season whenever anyone objects, and despite the last sentence it completely undermines any regulation.
 

Goatman Saint

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Couldn't tell you Jim. There is a lot of irrational fear about GMOs. I can't claim to know anything about it or the ongoing Monsanto conspiracy. I only have one problem with them, and its more about the chemicals and such that food now gets basted in routinely, which is why I posted what I did.
 

blackadder

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It's terrible, they basically force farmers to use their seeds, it's sick, I can't believe they let them do this, gunna be interesting to say the least, the food industry is the reason we're extremely fat, all processed food diets
Apparently the use investigators to run around neighboring farms of customers and check crop samples. If they find the DNA pattern matches their GMO stuff (could be due even to natural random cross pollenization due to wind) they will sue the farmer for using their product without a license...

And therein lies my opposition to GMO, apart from the bit about facilitating the massive use of weed killing chemicals -- you can't control how your genetically modified plant inserts itself into the gene pool out in nature...

EDIT:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/20...awyer-suggests-new-standard-for-suing-farmers

That was one landmark lawsuit and apparently they have not done it since due to the PR backlash...but I still don't trust greedy profit motivated humans who've purchased carte blanche from the government to mokey around with plant DNA and release it into the wild.
 

Galbreath34

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By the way, the "notwithstanding any other provision of law" basically means that the Secretary is supposed to be able to and even required to issue an exemption even if a court has ruled against Monsanto or ADM or whoever, meaning that until the corp wins or drops the case or it gets to the SCOTUS it's considered under a "required [analysis] or consultation". Opponents claim that it's basically a response to losing court orders on GM beets and alfalfa and directly intended to stop lawsuits from holding up use of their products even when a ruling goes against them.
 

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