Why the red states are red. (1 Viewer)

staphory

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I found this article on cracked(dot)com that explains why the author feels that red states are red. In short, it all boils down to cities vs small towns and rural areas. People who grew up and remained in those small towns and rural areas have a different perspective on life and therefore different priorities. I'm from a very small town and what he has written seems plausible to me.

I'll link it but beware, plenty of NSFW language.
How Half Of America Lost Its ******* Mind | Cracked.com
 

Saint_Ward

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I found this article on cracked(dot)com that explains why the author feels that red states are red. In short, it all boils down to cities vs small towns and rural areas. People who grew up and remained in those small towns and rural areas have a different perspective on life and therefore different priorities. I'm from a very small town and what he has written seems plausible to me.

I'll link it but beware, plenty of NSFW language.
How Half Of America Lost Its ******* Mind | Cracked.com
Thanks work....

This Websense category is filtered: Tasteless
This small town raised boy will have to read this later.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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am about to read, but posting ignorant is more fun (y'all better hit that, they won't all be softballs)
but couldn't you distill any one of dozens of sociological markers and get your venn diagram or bell curve to show "significance"?
 
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It seems plausible, but ignores that the same things those urban dwellers would like to see such as higher min wage, progressive tax rates, education, and infrastructure spending would benefit the the rural areas just as much if not more.

That 100 foot wall of cost of living is a lot less tall when you have businesses around because the average person does have money for discretionary spending. They probably don't even need to move to the city since they can be quite happy with the min wage job in the rural area. Add in better education and the ability to do well might just skyrocket. But to do that, the 1% and businesses have to pay back into the economy instead of just taking out.

It is more us against them, more divide and conquer.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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am about to read, but posting ignorant is more fun (y'all better hit that, they won't all be softballs)
but couldn't you distill any one of dozens of sociological markers and get your venn diagram or bell curve to show "significance"?
ok, REALLY good article - that reminded me of the way i felt reading NY Times Magazine articles that really bore down on stories and peeled back layers on stuff that seem obvious (which is obviously a super "blue" thing to say)

Dems get accused of keeping the ghetto poor so they can keep their votes (i would argue that the systemic nature of generations of poverty and the cities being hollowed out for the suburbs are at least contributing factors)

but, in these (poor) red towns there's been red mayors and red congressman and red governors and 8 yrs of red presidency - seems to me that if there was red will to do something about the problems the article cited, nothing could have stopped it
but it was the reds who starved the states of any monies that could have been spent fixing the problem
aside from the untoward aspersions what are the city folk doing to perpetuate the problem?
 

Kin Korn Karn

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To me it highlights the challenges of living in rural areas and explains why they are stuck in that loop. Same thing goes for urban voters who haven't seen much progress on their issues either. Takeaway for me is that there are a lot of low income families on both sides who are being manipulated into voting for people who only provide lip service for votes.
 

Saint_Ward

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It seems plausible, but ignores that the same things those urban dwellers would like to see such as higher min wage, progressive tax rates, education, and infrastructure spending would benefit the the rural areas just as much if not more.

That 100 foot wall of cost of living is a lot less tall when you have businesses around because the average person does have money for discretionary spending. They probably don't even need to move to the city since they can be quite happy with the min wage job in the rural area. Add in better education and the ability to do well might just skyrocket. But to do that, the 1% and businesses have to pay back into the economy instead of just taking out.

It is more us against them, more divide and conquer.
Meh, it depends.

Cost is living is lower, but job outlook is dismal. Every job is a min wage job, unless you work for the town (assuming you're not just in the county), have your own business, or the random factory/office/grocery store. So, a lot of people are in trades, but people have to be able to pay plumbers, carpenters, etc.

I grew up in a town of about 2000. However, we're right on Lake Michigan, so we get a lot of summer time Chicago visitors. Many of them own summer homes in the area, especially the big homes near the Lake. (let me tell you, does that build some resentment as well). The nearest Walmart was in a different town that was a 15-20 min drive. In winter that sucks. We had a mom and pop grocery store and mom and pop drug store. We still don't have a starbucks... you have to drive to that same town with the Walmart to get that. However, we do have a local, non-chain coffee shop that is awesome. But that didn't arrive until after I was in college (2000's). The famous ice cream shop does well, but the guy only hires High School kids to save on costs (which is fine by the kids). There are a few restaurants. We now have a hydroponic vegetable garden/store that's pretty cool, but that's in the old Plastic Injection Molding factory (cool how they cleaned that place up though). So, that's a major net loss. There is a Native Casino in the area that was approved about 5-10 years ago, so the school is getting a ton of money from that. We probably have one of the best schools in the area.

Now, I look at what was our rival school back in the mid 90's, and they are actually a consolidated school of about 3-4 towns in the area. Only one town has a bit of character to them, the others are super rural. You know it's bad, when rural kids, make fun of the really rural kids. Even though, my town never felt overly rural. Those areas are decimated. Other than farming, and the random boutique, it's pretty barren. Houses all could have used paint about 10 years ago. Heck, even my town is looking run down, minus the newer houses/summer houses.

My parents have let their place fall apart. They have some money to fix some of it, but for whatever reason haven't done anything with it. I guess that's an age thing.

Small business runs the towns. Corporations might as well be Martians.
 
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Cost is living is lower, but job outlook is dismal.
My argument is that is due to all the resources being sucked to the very top. It leaves precious little for everyone else. By increasing the tax on wealthier in order to foster growth at the bottom, you create more jobs.

A business doesn't expand production in order to spur sales. Increased sales spurs production. However, if people are too constrained to purchase items then there is no expansion. You get our current situation in which a few people are outrageously wealthy while everyone else scraps by.

I'm sure it's quite a bit more complex than that too, but history shows that higher tax rates on the top makes for a larger more robust middle class.
 

Galbreath34

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Combine the vid Chuck posted in the other thread with this and you have the full picture of the election. I do challenge Wong's assertion a bit that there's no real understanding in rural America of the legacy they are fighting for and its connection to old hatred. I think sometimes it's a guilty secret, and sometimes not a secret at all. I live now in a town under 40k. Sure the pain is real in small town America, not denying that, but Wong calls for a bit too much of Norman Rockwell sentimentality.

<blockquote class="twitter-video" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">&quot;In the good ol&#39; days...&quot; <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/13TH?src=hash">#13TH</a> <a href="https://t.co/2IzF87ODP6">pic.twitter.com/2IzF87ODP6</a></p>&mdash; 13TH (@13THFilm) <a href="https://twitter.com/13THFilm/status/786295040314253312">October 12, 2016</a></blockquote>
<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 

JimEverett

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ok, REALLY good article - that reminded me of the way i felt reading NY Times Magazine articles that really bore down on stories and peeled back layers on stuff that seem obvious (which is obviously a super "blue" thing to say)

Dems get accused of keeping the ghetto poor so they can keep their votes (i would argue that the systemic nature of generations of poverty and the cities being hollowed out for the suburbs are at least contributing factors)

but, in these (poor) red towns there's been red mayors and red congressman and red governors and 8 yrs of red presidency - seems to me that if there was red will to do something about the problems the article cited, nothing could have stopped it
but it was the reds who starved the states of any monies that could have been spent fixing the problem
aside from the untoward aspersions what are the city folk doing to perpetuate the problem?
Doesn't the failure of the"reds"go towards explaining the rise of Trump?

I think it is interesting to compare this article with the Vox article that Chuck posted a few weeks ago. That Vox article was trying to make the point that Trump supporters were motivated by white nationalism in an effort to maintain "white privilege." Which seems absurd to me.
One georgraphical area where Trump has his most support is Appalachia - the bank of the country that runs from north Alabama and Georgia through east Tennessee, western North Carolina, western Virginia, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, western Pennsylvania, and eastern Ohio. the majority of that area has been one of the poorest, and least "privileged" areas of the country almost from the start of the nation.
Further, I doubt you can find a group of people that self-identify in some way that have a more negative outlook on the present and future (economically) than Trump supporters. There is little "privilege" they have that they wish to maintain.
If you want to equate voting with maintaining privileged status - look at who the white people living in Manhattan, DC, San Fran, and other wealthy areas are voting.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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Doesn't the failure of the"reds"go towards explaining the rise of Trump?

I think it is interesting to compare this article with the Vox article that Chuck posted a few weeks ago. That Vox article was trying to make the point that Trump supporters were motivated by white nationalism in an effort to maintain "white privilege." Which seems absurd to me.
One georgraphical area where Trump has his most support is Appalachia - the bank of the country that runs from north Alabama and Georgia through east Tennessee, western North Carolina, western Virginia, eastern Kentucky, West Virginia, western Pennsylvania, and eastern Ohio. the majority of that area has been one of the poorest, and least "privileged" areas of the country almost from the start of the nation.
Further, I doubt you can find a group of people that self-identify in some way that have a more negative outlook on the present and future (economically) than Trump supporters. There is little "privilege" they have that they wish to maintain.
If you want to equate voting with maintaining privileged status - look at who the white people living in Manhattan, DC, San Fran, and other wealthy areas are voting.
no, i agree (except for the at paragraph) - you have to wonder why the 'reds" "identify with" a Trump or a GW Bush and villify Bill Clinton and Obama whose experiences are much closer to theirs
my best guess is it's harder watching someone "leave the hood" (thus turning more light on your predicament) than a silver spoon scion skating by in life

but to go to your privilege jab a bit
privilege is the number of doors open to you
if you live in Appalachia and 2 doors are open to you, and you know that 30 doors are open to someone in DC- that's going to be your focus
you're not going to even notice if your neighbor has only 1 door open to them

but really you're supposing that people are voting on their economics when that seems to be about 5th or 6th on the list of concerns
 

porculator

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It seems plausible, but ignores that the same things those urban dwellers would like to see such as higher min wage, progressive tax rates, education, and infrastructure spending would benefit the the rural areas just as much if not more.

That 100 foot wall of cost of living is a lot less tall when you have businesses around because the average person does have money for discretionary spending. They probably don't even need to move to the city since they can be quite happy with the min wage job in the rural area.
If you can't get a job, which is the underlying problem with these rural areas, an increase in minimum wage doesn't help you, it just means you have to pay more for everything.

One of the reasons I'm not sold on raising the federal minimum wage the way progressives want to.
 

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