Why white people keep calling the cops on black Americans (1 Viewer)

Optimus Prime

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Good article. Not sure if EE or PDB is best place for this. Mods please move if necessary.

The video Flip posted in the Fathers thread reminded me of this article. My girlfriend's brother told his son who was just going to college that there may be times dealing with the police that you have to choose between your dignity and your life. And as hard as it is to swallow ALWAYS choose your life.

This is ridiculous. The BBQ, The Air BnB, the Yale common room, reading a book

I'm just reading about the swimming pool one today. The cops weren't called but they were threatened with calling the cops
==================================================================================================================
Tina, a black woman from Milwaukee, was on a road trip with her eldest son when she had an unpleasant encounter with the police of a sort that’s all too common.

After stopping to fuel up the car, she realized that she hadn’t gotten the correct change from the station attendant. The attendant angrily disagreed.

“I said, “Let’s not argue with the man. Let’s go get the police,” Tina, whose name has been changed to protect her confidentiality, told me. ”When the police came, instead of him talking to me like I’m talking to you — respectfully — he got up in my face and told me to ‘shut up.’” When Tina told the police officer that he shouldn’t address her that way, he arrested Tina and her son.

The result seems drastic. But after hundreds of conversations in communities across the country that I conducted for my research on policing in America, I’ve learned that such testimonies are a common experience for black Americans, no matter the locality. I am a political scientist who studies how Americans understand government through their direct experience of it, which, for many, is interacting with the police. The gulf between how black America and white America experience the police is vast.

Many other Americans are waking up to the reality that white people have the power to turn minor disputes, or their own anxiety, into interventions by the police (which is hardly news in the black community).

Such incidents keep making news, including a white student at Yale calling police officers on a black student who had nodded off in a common area and a white woman in Oakland calling the police on a black family barbecuing in a part of a park that allowed barbecuing. (Three years ago at Yale, a campus police officer pulled a gun on a black student — the son of a prominent New York Times columnist — who was casually walking through campus.)

Many people are rightly questioning why black people going about their business are aggressively policed for selling loose cigarettes, barbecuing, sipping a latte, and simply existing in public spaces.....................

Whites calling the police have an altogether different experience. They do not endure long response times, treatment that negates their victimization, or the slide from victim to suspect in the eyes of the police. They may even gain a sense of personal efficacy in seeing the state perform its basic function of protecting them.

As Charles Epp and his colleagues wrote in their book Pulled Over, which grew out of a large representative survey analysis of white and black drivers, even when whites have involuntary contact with police, they overwhelmingly experience the police as helpful, benevolent, fair, and efficient problem solvers.

This mismatch in experience equates to powerful incentives for people of one racial group to call the police on others who could be seen as breaching “white space.” It’s also a powerful disincentive for black people to call the police in almost any situation except when their lives depend on it........................

Why white people keep calling the cops on black Americans
 

N.O.Bronco

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What evidence do you have that BBQ woman called the cops because the BBQ'ers were black?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evasion_(ethics)

Take some lessons here, you are being kinda rude.

People are asking you questions. They did so first. If you have a question the polite thing to do is to place it AFTER answering their inquiries first. It’s how this works...and given the rather enormous maximum word allowance for posts here, there is certainly the space to fit both your answers followed by whatever questions you have next.
 
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guidomerkinsrules

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Not really.. Perhaps I used a bad analogy... But my point is I have cops called on white folks around here all the time.. I am sure more throughout the nation... But yet ridiculous calls to the cops happen all the time. I am sure that more stupid calls happen to white folk... But it just doesn't make good news. There's really no way to spin it...

White woman calls cops on white kids playing in park..<<-- No biggie
White woman calls cops on Black kids playing in park... <<-- Whoa, potential news story here.

I am not going to dismiss the fact that I am sure that there are unwarrented calls on Black people by whites that are undeserving... But I am going to say that I bet there are way more unwarrented calls by white people on white people but it just doesn't make as good of click bait.
then i would say there are two possible routes to travel (probably lots more, but two is what i got off the top of my head)
- look for historical/social trends- is there historical precedent for this ie have white people called the cops on black people for being black - the history of lynchings give a resounding "yes"
- then you can also turn to others who've had experience with this and listen to their stories

then you can also look back to yourself and ask yourself why you believe things like dressing in women's clothing can turn boys gay or video games can make people sociopaths but you don't think racism is a prevalent issue
maybe check-in with yourself and see what's going on
 

WhoDatPhan78

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Well Ward.. Let me ask... The woman that called the cops on the people BBQ'ing in the park... Is there any evidence that the reason she called was because they were black? Or was she just a goody goody busybody?

If those people had been White, would the story have ever made the national news? Or would it have been nothing?

I'll await your answer...
The example you gave doesn’t work. Can’t you just acknowledge his point?
 

Joe OKC

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Wow, Using sarcasm is no longer acceptable here anymore!

I admitted two posts back that my analogy was not a good one... So to answer Ward since sarcasm is not a thing around here anymore... Those white kids may or may not have been breaking the law.. I don;t know.. I didn;t ask the cop or see them go to jail. But most likely they were doing something they shouldn't have been... Now.. With that said.

guido, loco, whodatphan... and Ward

What evidence is there that BBQ woman called the cops on the BBQ'ers because they were black?
 

Oye

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Well Ward.. Let me ask... The woman that called the cops on the people BBQ'ing in the park... Is there any evidence that the reason she called was because they were black? Or was she just a goody goody busybody?

If those people had been White, would the story have ever made the national news? Or would it have been nothing?

I'll await your answer...
I've stayed out of this thread, which has largely been one group of posters talking past other groups of posters. But I think this is worth jumping in on because it seems to be a culminating point of the false equivalency disconnect that's been going on.

So I'll try to take this step by step.

Is it true that people are busy bodies and call cops on other people - including whites calling on whites? Yes.

Is it true that white people have had the cops called on them for comparable reasons to the ones we are seeing here (trespassing, e.g.)? Yes.

Does it happen because those people are white? Perhaps. With the sort of frequency of these calls, it would not surprise me in the same way that it would not surprise me if there are aliens - because the sheer numbers of the thing we are talking about makes it seem reasonable that this has happened. Some resentful non-white calling cops on whites for trifling reasons because they are white. I'll grant you and anyone else that possibility.

But here's the thing: none of these is what some/many of the posters in the thread are talking about - which is the relative likelihood of a white person to call the cops on a black person or stop a black person in interrogative fashion out of a sense of entitlement (you don't live here, and I do, so I get to question you because I don't think you belong here, e.g.) or because they are outright racist or because they have succumbed (perhaps not even wittingly or willingly) to messages about how black people are dangerous, buying into the metonymical association that has been created (going back a *long* way in our society) between black skin and criminality. That last group might not be racist, but rather have what has been called 'racial stress' that I've talked about before.

That last group is what I understand the point is - and it's pervasive. The 'calling the cops' is merely one - increasingly public - version this takes. But it takes on all sorts of other forms. It doesn't have to result in a call to the police. It can be assumptions about a black kid's role in a fight with a white kid about being the instigator or deserving of harsher punishment. It's about assuming the black kid is doing drugs, more than the white kid is. It could be a black patron in a retail store being followed or watched more closely because they are black. It's about thinking that someone doesn't belong in a certain place based on his skin color. It's about assuming that someone must have stolen the car because a black woman wouldn't have a BMW in a nice neighborhood.

These are all things that I know about through work - actual examples. And there are many, many others.

And they happen because the person is black, many times. That doesn't mean the person who is calling is some out and out racist, KKK member, white supremacist.

The issue is, "Why are black people so frequently treated like X because they are black?" There are a lot of reasons and it happens with a frequency that would probably alarm you.

When you reach for "the white meth head" as a comparison, you're missing the larger point. There are black people who get arrested for commiting a crime and only that. But there a *lot* of black people who are troubled, harassed, pulled over, followed, suspected, etc simply because they have black skin.

That doesn't happen with nearly the same frequency with white people.

And the reason this issue is critical is - imo - because we are the United States of America, who prides ourselves on self-deterministic, meritocratic ideals in a land of opportunity.

When we deny people that - for any reason, including skin color - that's a worthwhile topic. And it gains increasing urgency with the relative frequency with which it happens. And it happens a lot.

When you respond by saying, "What about this white meth head around the corner the cop arrested?" only serves to highlight a lack of awareness or willingness to engage with what this topic is obviously about.
 

Joe OKC

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When you respond by saying, "What about this white meth head around the corner the cop arrested?" only serves to highlight a lack of awareness or willingness to engage with what this topic is obviously about.
The last two times I have been pulled over have been by a black cop ironically... So should I question his reasoning as to why he pulled me over? That he only did it because I was white? Or I wasn't wearing my seatbelt?


I've stayed out of this thread, which has largely been one group of posters talking past other groups of posters. But I think this is worth jumping in on because it seems to be a culminating point of the false equivalency disconnect that's been going on.
If there is absolutely zero evidence that BBQ woman called the cops on BBQ people because they were black. Then that makes the statistics and stats false.
 
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rajncajn

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In this case, if it's not on Breitbart or Fox, it most likely happens very rarely.
This is possibly one of the most closed-minded arguments I have ever seen in this board. It doesn't get out on YouTube and Twitter and Fox and whatever because nobody cares. It's everyday occurrences, it doesn't garner attention which is all they care about. How much evidence can you find on the internet if cops generally harassing white people? Not a whole lot. Yet most of us have our own stories of it happening. Just because nobody gives a damn about watching grass grow, paint dry and a bear crapping in the woods doesn't mean it doesn't happen and it's not common. If you believe what you see in the internet to be the norm then you are lost.
 
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Oye

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The last two times I have been pulled over have been by a black cop ironically... So should I question his reasoning as to why he pulled me over? That he only did it because I was white? Or I wasn't wearing my seatbelt?

If there is absolutely zero evidence that BBQ woman called the cops on BBQ people because they were black. Then that makes the statistics and stats false.
you continue to push false equivalencies - for the record, I addressed your first specific question explicitly. You've chosen to ignore it and continue to repeat the same insipid statements/questions over and over.

if you're not going to read/respond to anything then just say so and we can save each other time

whether or not one individual woman called on BBQ'ing black folk doesn't invalidate the systemic reality of racial discrimination/paranoia/metonymic/etc instances that happen every single day.

Do you not think black people are profiled, followed, suspected, harassed, pulled over, feared, questioned, etc based on their skin color alone? Every time this happens in this country's history or today it has nothing to do with skin color?

And if you think the lack of awareness of the inside of one woman's head (you don't know that she isn't/wasn't doing it because they were black - but you're running with a truth as it we do know - that's hypocritical, but nevermind) somehow invalidates "statistics" and "stats" (not sure how those are two different things), then you're not here for a discussion of reality and you have very little idea about these statistics and the larger body of research and what much of it actually says.

So why are you here?
 

Saint_Ward

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Well Ward.. Let me ask... The woman that called the cops on the people BBQ'ing in the park... Is there any evidence that the reason she called was because they were black? Or was she just a goody goody busybody?

If those people had been White, would the story have ever made the national news? Or would it have been nothing?

I'll await your answer...
Answer my question and I'll consider yours.

The white folk you specifically mentioned... were the cops called for cause? And was that cause correct?
 

Joe OKC

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I guess you should read all my replies before you claim that I didn't answer.
 

Oye

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I guess you should read all my replies before you claim that I didn't answer.
I did. You are routinely evasive and resort to the same false equivalencies

nowhere did you answer:

Do you think black people are often profiled, followed, suspected, harassed, pulled over, feared, questioned, etc based on their skin color alone?

A simple yes no will do.

If the child was raised by his mother watching drag queen shows since 2.. and she encouraged him to notice how pretty the costumes were. (Which she admits)

Then therefore watching these shows DID have an effect...

So Oye.. Do you support this?
Is an 11 year old boy dancing in drag at a gay bar that serves alcohal ok by you?

A simple yes no will do?
Quid pro quo
 

Joe OKC

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Since no one can provide
I did. You are routinely evasive and resort to the same false equivalencies

nowhere did you answer:

Do you think black people are often profiled, followed, suspected, harassed, pulled over, feared, questioned, etc based on their skin color alone?

A simple yes no will do.
Yes.. I do believe that.. Just as much as I do believe Bikers are, tweekers, Suspicious white people and many others that are White....

Want me to go into countless stories about Bikers being pulled over harassed and searched, or the local cops in my town... That have 10 cops per only 800 residences.

But since no one can provide any evidence that BBQ woman called the cops on BBQ people because they were black... Then that means the claim she did it because they were black is false, and the whole thing was a bunch of BS to fit the narrative.

BTW- that in no way means some of these claims aren't true.. But showing that one incident to be driven by other factors.
 

Oye

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Since no one can provide


Yes.. I do believe that.. Just as much as I do believe Bikers are, tweekers, Suspicious white people and many others that are White....

Want me to go into countless stories about Bikers being pulled over harassed and searched, or the local cops in my town... That have 10 cops per only 800 residences.

But since no one can provide any evidence that BBQ woman called the cops on BBQ people because they were black... Then that means the claim she did it because they were black is false, and the whole thing was a bunch of BS to fit the narrative.

BTW- that in no way means some of these claims aren't true.. But showing that one incident to be driven by other factors.
so you are saying that the institutional and social racism toward blacks is the same as that toward bikers, tweakers, and 'suspicious whites'? That is, this is an actual equivalency, and not a false equivalency?

whites have to be tweaking and a biker to be suspicious - and you think that blacks aren't 'suspicious' based on skin color alone? You added "tweaker" and "biker" to "white" - you seem to be hedging your bets.

this is a whole lot of 'yes, but' and it seems that you don't think that racism toward blacks - based on skin color alone - is really a problem in the US because white bikers get pulled over.
 

Joe OKC

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OMG Oye... Stop trying to put words in my mouth dude..

But why don;t you go back to BBQ woman and admit that was a bunch of Bullshirt to fit the narrative.
 

Oye

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OMG Oye... Stop trying to put words in my mouth dude..
they are your words - I asked a question about prevalance of discrimination/racism/harassment toward blacks and you reply "white bikers" and "white tweakers"

that's not me "dude" - that's you. You keep bringing it up when asked questions. You keep making the argument. You can say that this is actually equivalent or not. Up to you.

But why don;t you go back to BBQ woman and admit that was a bunch of Bullshirt to fit the narrative.
I already have.

This woman might not be racist. Or she might.

You seem to be assuming she isn't - or that we don't know - and that means something on a national scale. That the fact that we don't know means that every time a black person is harassed, followed, arrested, demeaned, questions, suspected, etc is all of a sudden in doubt.

So, say this woman isn't/wasn't racist.

Does that mean that blacks don't face unfair scrutiny and suspicion based on skin color alone?

It's not important to me if this woman, individually, is racist or not. My point doesn't rely on it.

It seems that yours does
 

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