Why white people keep calling the cops on black Americans (1 Viewer)

Optimus Prime

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Good article. Not sure if EE or PDB is best place for this. Mods please move if necessary.

The video Flip posted in the Fathers thread reminded me of this article. My girlfriend's brother told his son who was just going to college that there may be times dealing with the police that you have to choose between your dignity and your life. And as hard as it is to swallow ALWAYS choose your life.

This is ridiculous. The BBQ, The Air BnB, the Yale common room, reading a book

I'm just reading about the swimming pool one today. The cops weren't called but they were threatened with calling the cops
==================================================================================================================
Tina, a black woman from Milwaukee, was on a road trip with her eldest son when she had an unpleasant encounter with the police of a sort that’s all too common.

After stopping to fuel up the car, she realized that she hadn’t gotten the correct change from the station attendant. The attendant angrily disagreed.

“I said, “Let’s not argue with the man. Let’s go get the police,” Tina, whose name has been changed to protect her confidentiality, told me. ”When the police came, instead of him talking to me like I’m talking to you — respectfully — he got up in my face and told me to ‘shut up.’” When Tina told the police officer that he shouldn’t address her that way, he arrested Tina and her son.

The result seems drastic. But after hundreds of conversations in communities across the country that I conducted for my research on policing in America, I’ve learned that such testimonies are a common experience for black Americans, no matter the locality. I am a political scientist who studies how Americans understand government through their direct experience of it, which, for many, is interacting with the police. The gulf between how black America and white America experience the police is vast.

Many other Americans are waking up to the reality that white people have the power to turn minor disputes, or their own anxiety, into interventions by the police (which is hardly news in the black community).

Such incidents keep making news, including a white student at Yale calling police officers on a black student who had nodded off in a common area and a white woman in Oakland calling the police on a black family barbecuing in a part of a park that allowed barbecuing. (Three years ago at Yale, a campus police officer pulled a gun on a black student — the son of a prominent New York Times columnist — who was casually walking through campus.)

Many people are rightly questioning why black people going about their business are aggressively policed for selling loose cigarettes, barbecuing, sipping a latte, and simply existing in public spaces.....................

Whites calling the police have an altogether different experience. They do not endure long response times, treatment that negates their victimization, or the slide from victim to suspect in the eyes of the police. They may even gain a sense of personal efficacy in seeing the state perform its basic function of protecting them.

As Charles Epp and his colleagues wrote in their book Pulled Over, which grew out of a large representative survey analysis of white and black drivers, even when whites have involuntary contact with police, they overwhelmingly experience the police as helpful, benevolent, fair, and efficient problem solvers.

This mismatch in experience equates to powerful incentives for people of one racial group to call the police on others who could be seen as breaching “white space.” It’s also a powerful disincentive for black people to call the police in almost any situation except when their lives depend on it........................

Why white people keep calling the cops on black Americans
 

Joe OKC

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Your evidence guido? Link please. Don;t want you to discuss it.. I want you to provide it.
Does that mean that blacks don't face unfair scrutiny and suspicion based on skin color alone?
Of course there are incidents where black people face unfair scrutiny because of their skin color... Do you think that I am naive to the world we live in??? Are you happy Now?

But now you can admit like this instance about BBQ... The Uproar was internet and media sensation trying to say it was because they were black.. Had they been White.. There would have been no news or uproar at all...

But I will bet that you can't or won't admit to anything.. Just more typing and analyst ...
 

guidomerkinsrules

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Since no one can provide


Yes.. I do believe that.. Just as much as I do believe Bikers are, tweekers, Suspicious white people and many others that are White....

Want me to go into countless stories about Bikers being pulled over harassed and searched, or the local cops in my town... That have 10 cops per only 800 residences.
i agree with this - which would mean that bikers ALSO have a legit gripe about being over policed and (probably) overly scrutinized by 'locals'
you're positing it as a rebuttal to hypersensitive SJW's, but it actually supports the argument that's being made

i would imagine that the end of Easy Rider was indicative of situations that happened throughout small towns across the country - so over aggressive police and prejudiced (about long haired freaks in that instance) locals is something that is easy for you to believe
if you had some guy come up to you and she he was harassed bc of his long hair or cut or bike, you've indicated that you'd believe him - you wouldn't ask for proof
but for some reason with BBQ Becky you need some sworn affidavit to even consider it
 

Loco Hornet Fan

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Wow, Using sarcasm is no longer acceptable here anymore!

I admitted two posts back that my analogy was not a good one... So to answer Ward since sarcasm is not a thing around here anymore... Those white kids may or may not have been breaking the law.. I don;t know.. I didn;t ask the cop or see them go to jail. But most likely they were doing something they shouldn't have been... Now.. With that said.

guido, loco, whodatphan... and Ward

What evidence is there that BBQ woman called the cops on the BBQ'ers because they were black?
I’m going to stay out of this for the time being, but since you mentioned me, I thought I’d at least post that clarification.

There are still some questions other posters have asked you that haven’t been addressed yet. You have said many times that you don’t have time to respond to multiple people and feel ganged up on a lot (echo chamber).

I don’t want to muddy the waters or be a reason that some of these questions don’t get the answers they deserve.

I’ll simply say that I have issues with some of the examples you’ve used and wonder how you can be all in on tv turning people gay (or straight) but need a bunch of evidence when it comes to black people being treated with more suspicion.
 

Oye

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But I will bet that you can't or won't admit to anything.. Just more typing and analyst ...
I have already outlined your specific examples and said that they exist. Again, it's pretty evident you aren't reading. It was in the first post I made today in this thread.

The discussion is the equivalency - in degree and type - of discrimination that blacks face relative to white tweakers or white bikers or etc. Which you keep bringing up as relevant but then ignoring the begged questions/follow ups.

But continue to ignore my responses and acting like I haven't so that you can position yourself as a victim to everyone else just looking to be mean to you on the internet.
 

guidomerkinsrules

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then i would say there are two possible routes to travel (probably lots more, but two is what i got off the top of my head)
- look for historical/social trends- is there historical precedent for this ie have white people called the cops on black people for being black - the history of lynchings give a resounding "yes"
- then you can also turn to others who've had experience with this and listen to their stories

then you can also look back to yourself and ask yourself why you believe things like dressing in women's clothing can turn boys gay or video games can make people sociopaths but you don't think racism is a prevalent issue
maybe check-in with yourself and see what's going on
@Joe OKC here's one

k, i'm not surprised you're having the same difficulties OP is b/c it's similar to the difficulties you had with your own arguments in the thread you linked
for OP everything about the story is wrong and everything linked to it is tainted
problem is he can't articulate why it's wrong (same with you and the library)
the more he was questioned, the more the goalposts moved
eventually he noticed the trap he had set for himself, and had to make some blanket claim that all preteens performing in an adult club is wrong bc it's automatically sexualized - if you took the kids tap dancing for nickles in the french quarter and brought them into a club it would automatically be sexualized -- he doesn't explain how this happens. it just does
he also doesn't explain why he has the issue with this one drag kid (even though he's not doing sexualized movement), but he is unconcerned about the 10000s of young girls doing for real sexualized movement at recitals and competitions across the country - this is the pushback he has gotten b/c he cannot articulate his concern or defend his position

you at least remain on brand with your concern about 2 yr old Desmond watching RuPaul's shows - -that tracks with your concern about the library even though i'm certain you wouldn't be able 'prove' the danger (i refer you back to the 'white people calling cops' thread where i've expressed concern about what things you require proof for and what things you don't)

now to the mjcouvi thing - -he is celebrating that the boy is able to express himself - everyone in this thread has expressed some form of 'ick' about the adult men giving him money in this setting - BUT that's not an issue with Desmond just like it's not an issue with preteen girls in skimpy clothing getting leered at by skeevy men

THAT's what i was saying
and the other
 

Loco Hornet Fan

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Yes.. I do believe that.. Just as much as I do believe Bikers are, tweekers, Suspicious white people and many others that are White....
You are comparing people who aren’t doing anything wrong, who are behaving normally (they just happen to be black) with tweakers, “suspicious” people, and people breaking the law (in previous posts).

But since no one can provide any evidence that BBQ woman called the cops on BBQ people because they were black... Then that means the claim she did it because they were black is false, and the whole thing was a bunch of BS to fit the narrative.
The way in which you keep arriving at this conclusion does not make sense. Because the caller did not specifically state “this is only because they are black” then the claim is demonstrably false and “a bunch of BS”? That doesn’t track.
 
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Oye

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You are comparing people who aren’t doing anything wrong, who are behaving normally (they just happen to be black) with tweakers, “suspicious” people, and people breaking the law (in previous posts).
this has been pointed out more than once - an innocent, black bystander being harassed, questioned, stopped is the same as a white meth head or tweaker

these are the same thing, apparently - there's nothing that's been said that has been an even discussion of skin color alone.

He has no idea if this woman is not racist and we don't have any idea if she is. But when the event is contextualized with other events - that are very similar - and the body of history and research vis a vis racial discrimination, the discussion goes beyond this one single woman.

if Joe wants to acknowledge the pervasiveness of social, instutionalized racism - which reasonably leads people to look at situations like this and justifiably ask about the role that skin color plays - then maybe we can get somewhere in the discussion.

But, if the obsession with whether or not this woman is/was racist or did this for racial/racist reasons as some sort of device by which we can diminish racial discrimination in this country, then there's nowhere to go.

I find most troubling that the underlying assumption seems to be (based on the insistence of the content of the posts and repeated points) that Joe sees a discussion on real, widespread, un-American discrimination against blacks based on skin color alone is just some "narrative BS." And it's not. That diminishes the lived experiences of countless African Americans every day.
 

Saint_Ward

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this has been pointed out more than once - an innocent, black bystander being harassed, questioned, stopped is the same as a white meth head or tweaker

these are the same thing, apparently - there's nothing that's been said that has been an even discussion of skin color alone.

He has no idea if this woman is not racist and we don't have any idea if she is. But when the event is contextualized with other events - that are very similar - and the body of history and research vis a vis racial discrimination, the discussion goes beyond this one single woman.

if Joe wants to acknowledge the pervasiveness of social, instutionalized racism - which reasonably leads people to look at situations like this and justifiably ask about the role that skin color plays - then maybe we can get somewhere in the discussion.

But, if the obsession with whether or not this woman is/was racist or did this for racial/racist reasons as some sort of device by which we can diminish racial discrimination in this country, then there's nowhere to go.

I find most troubling that the underlying assumption seems to be (based on the insistence of the content of the posts and repeated points) that Joe sees a discussion on real, widespread, un-American discrimination against blacks based on skin color alone is just some "narrative BS." And it's not. That diminishes the lived experiences of countless African Americans every day.
Yes, that's what I was trying to get to.

Biker = criminal (sadly, but back in the day, somewhat earned)
meth head = criminal, because they actually are.

Black = criminal... why? I mean, I get that some look the part, just like some Latinos, some whites, Asians, etc. But almost all of them? C'mon now.

Heck, I remember seeing a white guy in a suit, riding a crotch rocket, thinking.. this man is an assassin. Let him pass.

That's the problem. With every other group, you have some level of reason to be suspicious, but with black people, they're all (all might be strong) lumped in that same viewpoint?
 

Oye

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That's the problem. With every other group, you have some level of reason to be suspicious, but with black people, they're all (all might be strong) lumped in that same viewpoint?
yes, other groups in the examples posted as counters have all needed some qualifier, generally speaking

with blacks, it's often just skin color

I posted the video before of the black woman writing a check and being asked for a piece of ID and then a second piece of ID and having her license compared to the "bad check notebook", right after her light-skinned/white-looking sister in law wrote a check with no other follow up questions asked.

That doesn't mean that the young checker was racist, but it could very mean that the checker believed that black people are less financially reliable - a stereotype that has been documented, in research, that people believe about blacks. And whether or not that individual cashier was racist or doing it because she saw a black woman and thought she was not financially reliable compared to the white-looking woman before her doesn't impact the reality that a lot of blacks face, which is that their skin color will be held against them in such a transaction.
 
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This is possibly one of the most closed-minded arguments I have ever seen in this board.
It was a statement of belief more so than an argument. Before assuming I have a closed mind, please ask me for an explanation first.
It doesn't get out on YouTube and Twitter and Fox and whatever because nobody cares.
I didn't mention youtube or twitter and this thread proves people care about proving that these instances are not racially motivated and not a big deal.

Breitbart and Fox have a long history of trying to prove that racism is no longer a problem here. They care very much about disproving racism. That's why I think it's reasonable to assume that they would be doing their best to either discredit these events of unjustified cop calling or to prove that it happens just as much in a white on white or non-white on white dynamic. I don't see how that is close-minded or an unreasonable opinion.

It's everyday occurrences, it doesn't garner attention which is all they care about.
Again, Fox and Breitbart have a long history of trying to discredit or minimize the race issue that still exists in our society, just like some white posters here have cared enough about this issue to share their stories of being harassed by cops.

I haven't heard anyone share a story of having the police called on them for barbecuing in a park, talking to their mother in a hotel lobby, selling bottles of water as a child or any of the other recent events. I believe that if those type of stories were just a prevalent as the white on non-white stories, we would have heard about them.

That's not to say it doesn't happen at all, just that it's not nearly as prevalent as white on non-white. I think that warrants a discussion as to why the occurences are so disproportionate.

Imagine barcueing in the park with family and friends and someone calls the cops on you. That really sucks if it happens just once. Imagine if that general treatment of people intervening when you are legally minding your own business happened a lot when you were out in public.

How much evidence can you find on the internet if cops generally harassing white people? Not a whole lot.
Youtube is full of videos of whites being harrased by cops. That's one of the reasons why I think in addition to racism among some police officers and forces, general authoritarianism is a problem too. However, this thread is not about cops harassing people.

This thread is about whites calling cops on non-whites without any apparent justification, which does raise the reasonable question of whether or not these incidents are racially motivated. Them being racially motivated doesn't have to come from a place of full on hatred. It could just be that they are afraid and more suspicious of any non-white person. Look back at Oye's post as he explains it well.

I've actually had the cops called on me unjustly by white people twice. While I was living in New Orleans, someone who lived a couple of apartment buildings away from me told I cop that I was friends with someone who was harassing him. On my walk back home from a 7-11, he and the cop were waiting for me. Even though the man inisted he was right about me, the cop asked a few questions and let me continue home.

The other time I was accused of a felony theft by my boss the day after he fired me. Turned out it was another employee, but the owner got his detective buddies to screw with me for a few weeks, you know...just for fun. That was the only time I've ever been harassed by cops. Even when I've been pulled over and given a sobriety test (which is funny because I don't drink alcohol), I haven't been harassed.

In both instances in which a cop was called on me, I was accused of a specific crime. I've had people be rude to me for no reason in public settings, but never has anyone called the cops on me.

Just because nobody gives a damn about watching grass grow, paint dry and a bear crapping in the woods doesn't mean it doesn't happen and it's not common. If you believe what you see in the internet to be the norm then you are lost.
I don't believe what I see on the internet to be the norm, just the opposite. I've said as much more than once on this forum. At the same time, I do know that Breitbart and Fox do everything they can to try to prove that racism isn't a problem in this country and that incidents like these are not racially motivated.

I know that it is very prevalent for non-whites to be treated with more fear and suspicion than white people, because I see reminders of it several times a week in my real life, in addition to reading or seeing stories about it in the news. I don't rely on social media or public forums for news.

In my daily life it's simple things like a grocery store clerk giving me the bathroom security code (with no cart or anything in my hands) and then immediately refusing to give it to a non-white woman until she proved she was shopping there. There was nothing suspicious or threatening about the woman.

Imagine what it felt like for her to be refused going to the bathroom after hearing me being given access.

Conversely, I rarely ever see a white person treated with fear and suspicion for no apparent reason.
 
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guidomerkinsrules

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and this is who they call

A Detroit police officer is under fire for a racist Snapchat video of a black woman he pulled over for a traffic stop.
Officer Gary Steele has been reassigned while the Detroit Police Department investigates the video, which department officials confirmed he posted on Tuesday.
The incident began after he pulled over 23-year-old Ariel Moore for having an expired registration and seized the vehicle.
Steele then told her to exit the vehicle so the vehicle could be towed. She declined a ride home from the officers and had to walk a block home in below-freezing weather, according to Detroit station WXYZ.
The video shows her walking away, one of the officers says she is doing the “walk of shame,” and stickers are added that read, “What black girl magic looks like” and “celebrating Black History Month.”
It ended with an officer saying, “Bye, Felicia,”
according to the Detroit Metro Times.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/gary-steele-detroit-police-racist-snapchat-video_us_5c53697ae4b0bdf0e7d974d0?ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067
 

Taurus

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and this is who they call

A Detroit police officer is under fire for a racist Snapchat video of a black woman he pulled over for a traffic stop.
Officer Gary Steele has been reassigned while the Detroit Police Department investigates the video, which department officials confirmed he posted on Tuesday.
The incident began after he pulled over 23-year-old Ariel Moore for having an expired registration and seized the vehicle.
Steele then told her to exit the vehicle so the vehicle could be towed. She declined a ride home from the officers and had to walk a block home in below-freezing weather, according to Detroit station WXYZ.
The video shows her walking away, one of the officers says she is doing the “walk of shame,” and stickers are added that read, “What black girl magic looks like” and “celebrating Black History Month.”
It ended with an officer saying, “Bye, Felicia,”
according to the Detroit Metro Times.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/gary-steele-detroit-police-racist-snapchat-video_us_5c53697ae4b0bdf0e7d974d0?ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067
They seized her car for expired tabs? Holy crap.
 

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