Wood grain ceramic floor tile (1 Viewer)

itztime

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Just built a home, didn't go with ceramic, we looked at and liked it but the work involved in installing it seemed hefty. We wanted something durable and water proof, so after many months of trying to find what we thought was right, we chose the vinyl wood planks. Total water proof, you can run a key across them to try and scratch and it does not scratch. Was a little more pricey then everything else we looked at $2.99 sq/ft, plus $1.50 a sq/ft for installation. Five months in and we are still happy and feel we made the right choice.
 
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saintfan-n-alex

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Just built a home, didn't go with ceramic, we looked at and liked it but the work involved in installing it seemed hefty. We wanted something durable and water proof, so after many months of trying to find what we thought was right, we chose the laminate wood planks. Total water proof, you can run a key across them to try and scratch and it does not scratch. Was a little more pricey then everything else we looked at $2.99 sq/ft, plus $1.50 a sq/ft for installation. Five months in and we are still happy and feel we made the right choice.
Thanks for the input i'll look into that option as well , one area is a half bath and an area where the dog sleeps and like to scratch before laying down
 

melman

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We chose the laminate wood planks also and not that pleased with them. 1st it was the color (too dark) and if you drop a quarter or pen on them it sounds like a gun shot going off...and mine not exactly water proof as only a damp mop should be used, no standing water or some warpage may occur...
 

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Ceramic is not that difficult, to be honest. Yes it's a couple of steps, but it's not hard at all and lasts a long time. I have laid many types of flooring (probably as many types as I can think of) and keep coming back to ceramic. I used the stranded bamboo for half my house and loved installing it and the way it looks, but it scratches much easier than advertised. If I had to do it again, wood grain ceramic is the way I would go.
 

Saint_Ward

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Everyone in Florida pretty much has tile floors. One of my friends got the wood looking tile in their bathroom. Then, a few months later, ended up re-flooring the whole house (maybe not the bedroom) with it.

I have no idea what goes into all that, but it looks nice and other than the usual tile issues of dropping things, it's often more durable than wood. it won't scratch. But, you can fracture it.

Always keep a few extra tiles hidden away somewhere.
 

The Mongoose

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I think it's cheesy. If you want wood, get wood. If you want tile, get tile. Would you buy a pizza that looks like a hamburger? Or a car that looks like a motorcycle?
 

DavidM

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We recently had porcelain wood-look tiles installed throughout the living areas, kitchen, and halls.

I'm far from an expert but a couple of considerations that I picked up on in the process:

Read about porcelain and ceramic and see if the difference matters to you. Seemed like the consensus was porcelain is more durable but I'm not sure how significant the practical difference is. We went with builder-grade 24" planks from Lowes so not high-end, anyway.

Research plank tiles (if that is the style you are going with) and installation patterns, for instance: Porcelain wood plank tile floors -tips for buying and installing

Since you are doing smaller areas, probably not as much of a consideration for you, but for bigger projects, it's good to remember that complete tile removal can be labor intensive and costly vs some other flooring choices.
 

Saint_Ward

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We recently had porcelain wood-look tiles installed throughout the living areas, kitchen, and halls.

I'm far from an expert but a couple of considerations that I picked up on in the process:

Read about porcelain and ceramic and see if the difference matters to you. Seemed like the consensus was porcelain is more durable but I'm not sure how significant the practical difference is. We went with builder-grade 24" planks from Lowes so not high-end, anyway.

Research plank tiles (if that is the style you are going with) and installation patterns, for instance: Porcelain wood plank tile floors -tips for buying and installing

Since you are doing smaller areas, probably not as much of a consideration for you, but for bigger projects, it's good to remember that complete tile removal can be labor intensive and costly vs some other flooring choices.
Ceramic tile vs porcelain tile | difference between the tiles
 

boutrous

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The only difference you will ever detect if you install yourself is that porcelain is harder to cut with a scorer. But just rent or buy a cheap wet saw ($99 at Home Depot) and you'll never have to worry about it. Plus, I'm pretty sure that with the wood-grain tile they are all going to be porcelain. Ceramic is darker material so the color options for printing would be less.
 
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saintfan-n-alex

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We recently had porcelain wood-look tiles installed throughout the living areas, kitchen, and halls.

I'm far from an expert but a couple of considerations that I picked up on in the process:

Read about porcelain and ceramic and see if the difference matters to you. Seemed like the consensus was porcelain is more durable but I'm not sure how significant the practical difference is. We went with builder-grade 24" planks from Lowes so not high-end, anyway.

Research plank tiles (if that is the style you are going with) and installation patterns, for instance: Porcelain wood plank tile floors -tips for buying and installing

Since you are doing smaller areas, probably not as much of a consideration for you, but for bigger projects, it's good to remember that complete tile removal can be labor intensive and costly vs some other flooring choices.
I'll look into the differences but as stated below that porcelain is the material used for wood grain I assumed it was ceramic

The previous home owner pulled up all the flooring at stained the concrete so assuming it's level I'm good in that regard , the half bath as that stick on tile , someone told me I could lay tile on top of that but I'm not sure sounds like cutting corners - not sure how hard that it is to pull up and if I need to clean any adhesive residue etc
 

porculator

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They work fine as long as your subfloor is very level. The thing about those wood plank tiles is they are as long as actual wood planks but not as flexible.

Personally I think it's weird when you expect a wood floor and then step on a cold *** tile. But a powder room/half bath is the perfect place for it.
 

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They work fine as long as your subfloor is very level. The thing about those wood plank tiles is they are as long as actual wood planks but not as flexible.

Personally I think it's weird when you expect a wood floor and then step on a cold *** tile. But a powder room/half bath is the perfect place for it.
If you're really worried about cold tile, you could install floor heater tubing. I know someone who did that as they're building their house. They love it. The floor is almost too warm for me, but it was pretty cool (or hot, really).
 

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